Peruvian Armed Forces, National Police Destroy 37 Clandestine Airstrips

first_img Colombian National Army dismantles 2 cocaine laboratories Since 2011, Peruvian Security Forces have destroyed at least 102 clandestine landing strips used by narco-traffickers. Most runways were 500 meters long, 10 meters wide and were located in the VRAEM. “These operations are a major blow to drug offenders who are the primary means of financing the terrorist organization Shining Path,” General César Astudillo Salcedo said. “These operations are a major blow to drug offenders who are the primary means of financing the terrorist organization Shining Path,” General César Astudillo Salcedo said. The FARC and the ELN are the country’s largest guerrilla groups. Both organizations use proceeds from narco-trafficking to fund their terrorist activities. Colombian National Army dismantles 2 cocaine laboratories The Colombian National Army recently destroyed one cocaine laboratory controlled by the National Liberation Army (ELN) and another used by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) during separate operations in the Departments of Nariño and Guaviare, respectively. Two days later, the Special Brigade Against Drug Trafficking Unit Air Assault Aviation Division and the Unified Action Groups for Personal Liberty (GAULA) seized 292 kilograms of cocaine from a structure belonging to the ELN’s Guerra Carlos Alberto Troches Front. The cocaine had a street value of about 890.6 million pesos ($348,318 USD). Troops with the Peruvian Armed Forces and National Police officers recently destroyed 37 clandestine airstrips used by the Shining Path to transport drug in the Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region. By Dialogo April 06, 2015 Since 2011, Peruvian Security Forces have destroyed at least 102 clandestine landing strips used by narco-traffickers. Most runways were 500 meters long, 10 meters wide and were located in the VRAEM. The FARC and the ELN are the country’s largest guerrilla groups. Both organizations use proceeds from narco-trafficking to fund their terrorist activities. The airstrips, which are known as narcopistas, play a major role in the drug trade: about 90 percent of the cocaine produced in the VRAEM is transported out of the region by small aircraft. Given that high demand, owners can charge as much as US$12,000 for its use. Narco-traffickers use small planes to fly about half the cocaine produced in Peru to Bolivia; from there, the drugs are transported to Central America, Brazil, Mexico, the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. During the first operation on March 27, the Twenty-Second Jungle Brigade seized 250 kilograms of chopped coca leaves, 55 gallons of coca leaves being processed into cocaine and 10 gallons of ammonia — among other supplies and equipment — from the laboratory belonging to the FARC’s 44th Antonio Ricaurte Front in the Department of Guaviare. Two days later, the Special Brigade Against Drug Trafficking Unit Air Assault Aviation Division and the Unified Action Groups for Personal Liberty (GAULA) seized 292 kilograms of cocaine from a structure belonging to the ELN’s Guerra Carlos Alberto Troches Front. The cocaine had a street value of about 890.6 million pesos ($348,318 USD). Troops with the Peruvian Armed Forces and National Police officers recently destroyed 37 clandestine airstrips used by the Shining Path to transport drug in the Apurímac, Ene and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region. During the first operation on March 27, the Twenty-Second Jungle Brigade seized 250 kilograms of chopped coca leaves, 55 gallons of coca leaves being processed into cocaine and 10 gallons of ammonia — among other supplies and equipment — from the laboratory belonging to the FARC’s 44th Antonio Ricaurte Front in the Department of Guaviare. The Colombian National Army recently destroyed one cocaine laboratory controlled by the National Liberation Army (ELN) and another used by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) during separate operations in the Departments of Nariño and Guaviare, respectively. The airstrips, which are known as narcopistas, play a major role in the drug trade: about 90 percent of the cocaine produced in the VRAEM is transported out of the region by small aircraft. Given that high demand, owners can charge as much as US$12,000 for its use. Narco-traffickers use small planes to fly about half the cocaine produced in Peru to Bolivia; from there, the drugs are transported to Central America, Brazil, Mexico, the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. last_img read more

New unbundled legal services rules get mostly positive initial reviews

first_imgMost family law lawyers and judges haven’t had any personal experience with new rules that allow the delivery of unbundled legal services in family law cases, but those who have like the rules.Bar Unlicensed Practice of Law Counsel Lori Holcomb reported to the Bar Board of Governors last month on a special committee that has been reviewing the unbundled rules, which became effective January 1, 2004. Those rules allow lawyers to be hired to handle discrete parts — such as preparing a motion or appearing at a specific hearing — of a family law case, without taking on responsibility for the entire proceeding.Holcomb said the committee has sent surveys to family lawyers and judges, and advertised for feedback in the Bar News.“Not that many attorneys are doing unbundled work and many judges haven’t seen it, but those who have generally had a positive experience,” Holcomb said.Among items raised, she said, are getting more information about unbundled services to the public, preparing a draft retainer agreement for such work, and determining whether unbundled services can be offered in Department of Revenue child support enforcement actions.The board voted to approve the report, which will be forwarded to the Supreme Court. May 15, 2005 Regular News New unbundled legal services rules get mostly positive initial reviewscenter_img New unbundled legal services rules get mostly positive initial reviewslast_img read more

Jason ‘The Prison Pride’ Barker – fighting for a second chance

first_imgJASON Barker is an inmate of the Camp Street Prison; incarcerated for the past nine of his 20 years sentence, but now, a nominee for National Sports Commission (NSC) Sportsman-of-the-Year award, he’s seeking a second chance to make a first impression.In 2008, Magistrate Chandra Sohan sentenced Barker and three others to a total of 30 years imprisonment for three counts of robbery under arms, three counts of attempted murder and possession of a firearm.Barker was 20-years-old at the time when he admitted to the offences and pleaded with the magistrate at the Albion Magistrates Court to be lenient. Barker, a former soldier, told the magistrate that he had been charged in the past with stealing an AK-47 from the army.It was while incarcerated Barker picked up the sport of boxing, and why not? After all the now Caribbean Heavyweight and Superheavyweight champion said that every day, behind bars, it was a fight for survival.“I came up in a single home, single parent, she alone working, then I wanted to help, went to drugs, started selling drugs, then the guns and because of the money and the situation home whereby we had nobody to give us anything and she was struggling.No work, and we still had to eat. So I turned to a life of crime; drugs, robbery and now I’m in prison” Barker said in an exclusive interview with Chronicle Sport at the penal facility.Barker claimed both the Heavyweight and Superheavyweight titles when he participated in the Caribbean Championships in Barbados last year; something he said was far from his thinking, especially since he’s an inmate.Guyana Boxing Association (GBA) president Steve Ninvalle stated that Barker was nominated without hesitation given the fact “he has done, himself, the Guyana Prison Service and Guyana very proud. I am not certain but this may be the first time that we have actually had an inmate of the prison being nominated for such a prestigious award.”“I never thought that one day I would be champion in anything, honestly, when I came here (Camp Street Prison), I thought life was over for me and I was just going to spend my time, survive however it is and just come out” a sadden Barker said.However, he added “when I came into the prison, the prison officer Mr. Graham said I have good size to box and he introduced me to the gym. Eventually I get to like the sport and I just did my thing after then. It’s about making up your mind to succeed and deal with the circumstances, be discipline towards the sport and find yourself feeling like you have nothing to lose.”Known known as the ‘The Prison Pride’, a name given to him by fellow inmates and guards, Barker, sorrowfully told Chronicle Sport, “yea, I regret what happened, every day I regret what happened but I tell myself I’m changed now so when I get back out there I wouldn’t be the same person.From the time I’m in prison, I find myself being discipline, getting to know life, getting to have faith, getting to believe in myself, because once you believe in yourself, you could make something out of life.”He added “I never thought that I would’ve been nominated for anything and the guys in here they look out for me and encourage me to focus on boxing. I want to be a world Champion, this (boxing) is my life now and I hope people can now see me as a boxer and not a criminal.”Barker believes his life is much like Bernard Hopkins, the former middleweight world Champion, who at 17-years-old, was sentenced to 18 years in Prison for nine felonies but also discovered his passion for boxing behind bars. In 1988, after serving five years of his sentence, upon release Hopkins turned pro and, the rest as they say, ‘was history’.“I’m a change man, I’m not the same person that walked into this jail. Boxing saved me and I want to repay the people who believed in me to give me this chance to show the world my talent, especially my coach and president (Steve) Ninvalle” Barker said.Barker will be up against Olympian Troy Doris, Guyana cricket captain Leon Johnson and motor racing champion Kristian Jeffrey, but the Camp Street inmate believes “even if I don’t win, to my fellow inmate, I’m already a champion; their champion. It would be great if I win yes, but if I don’t, the guys will be proud of me same way.”last_img read more