Delay on HSE’s 2019 capital plan sparks concern for local services

first_imgDeputy Pat the Cope Gallagher has criticised the HSE for failing to publish the 2019 capital plan more than six months into the year.The plan,  which determines the projects that can progress in 2019, still has not been finalised and is due in the coming weeks. But opposition TDs have complained about the lack of progress so far.Donegal Fianna Fáil TD Pat the Cope Gallagher is concerned about the impact of the cost overruns this year: “We know from officials that the HSE was forced to change the capital plan substantially because of the massive overspend on the National Children’s Hospital, but we know little else as it hasn’t been published. “Despite numerous Ministers telling us that no projects would be cancelled as a result of the overrun, the HSE national director of strategic planning and transformation acknowledged that the ‘issue at the national children’s hospital will have a very significant impact on our plan’,” he said.Pat the Cope said that it is hard not to be cynical in relation to the delay and to question why the Government have not yet published the plan yet. “Is it because they know that there will be capital projects cancelled or postponed,” he asked.“I had highlighted previously the Donegal concerns which I had regarding pending capital projects, some months ago I expressed concerns regarding the future capital commitment to upgrade the three Donegal Community Hospitals namely St Joseph’s Stranorlar, Ramelton and Lifford Community Hospitals, also I was concerned regarding the impact it would have on the O’Cleirigh Centre Donegal Town. In the context of the present capital plan being a full 6 months late in publication, meaning that half the year is gone before funding is released then my concerns are well and truly justified,” concluded Pat the Cope.  Delay on HSE’s 2019 capital plan sparks concern for local services was last modified: July 1st, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Top 5 Spotify Apps For Music Discovery

first_img9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App john paul titlow Tags:#discovery#lastfm#music#Recommendation Engines#spotify Spotify wasn’t built for discovery. The Swedish music streaming company realizes this and instead of trying to natively bake a zillion features into its service, it launched a platform for third party developers about a year ago. Spotify’s app directory now features almost 60 HTML5-based add-ons for the service’s desktop client. These apps perform a lot of different functions – some are social, while others sonically augment album reviews from big name publishers. The thing for which they’re probably most useful is discovering music you might like but may never have heard otherwise.1. MoodagentSince launching on Spotify last year, Moodagent has been one of the most interesting apps on the platform. That’s because it takes standard algorithmic music recommendations and beefs them up with emotional intelligence. There are at least a dozen apps that let you build a playlist based on related artists, but Moodagent factors in the mood of each song to build out something that feels more consistent. The options look broad, but are surprisingly powerful. A playlist can be sensual, angry, happy, tender or some combination of all four. You can even base them on tempo, playing back a series of similarly paced songs. Tie these characteristics to the same kind of artist-to-artist matching algorithm that fuels so many other music-discovery apps, and you have a uniquely intelligent system for finding new music. 2. Last.fmLast.fm has been around for a decade now, but the Internet radio and music recommendation service is still a reliable tool for discovering new artists. It works by keeping track of everything you listen to and using a Pandora-style algorithm to recommend related artists and albums. It’s a simple concept, but one that apparently holds up quite well over time. Existing users of Last.fm will feel right at home in its Spotify app, which more or less frames a slightly modified version of the service’s usual interface into Spotify’s desktop client. The results occasionally need to be tweaked, but on the whole the recommendations are pretty solid. A few albums in my own physical record collection landed there thanks to Last.fm’s ability to turn up hidden gems.  3. Swarm.fmOh great, another social music-discovery app. Ho-hum.Actually, Swarm.fm is pretty useful. It uses data from Facebook to show you what music your friends are listening to, even if they’re not signed up for Swarm.fm. If they are, that data becomes much more detailed and easily explored. Swarm.fm will also let you know if any artists in your own collection have new releases, which is far more relevant than the new releases coughed up by Spotify itself. That tag cloud on the home tab might look like just another collection of metadata, but it’s actually informed by your social music data. I listen to a number of artists who don the tag “space rock” – and when I click that tag, it shows me dozens of similar bands. I can then sort those artists by popularity and what’s trending on Swarm.fm, which is a good way to pinpoint worthwhile listens.4. ShareMyPlaylistsWhen I first opened ShareMyPlaylists, I thought “Oh, this is looks fairly generic.” Alternative, Classical, Blues, Dance. One-size-fits-all playlists.I was wrong. When you scroll down, you see a wide variety of very specific playlists: Beatles covers, the songs sampled by Nas and music from Quentin Tarantino films, songs featuring Moog synthesizers. It’s a random conglomeration of curated listening experiences, but one that is well worth browsing. ShareMyPlaylists has something for absolutely everyone. Devotees of popular music from the charts can browse the “Top 50” tab while those with more under-the-radar tastes will find plenty of new stuff under the “Recommended” tab, which finds playlists based on the artists you listen to the most. If nothing in either section suits your mood, you can always run a search or use the app’s built-in playlist generator. 5. The Hype MachineIt’s been a wildly popular MP3 aggregator on the Web for years, so it only makes sense that The Hype Machine would find its way into Spotify’s app store. It’s right at home on top of the streaming service’s massive library of music. The Hype Machine eschews the complex algorithm in favor of human-curated playlists. Specifically, it aggregates tracks from popular music blogs across a wide range of genres, each of them very heavily populated. Dream Pop, for example, isn’t exactly a top 40 genre of music, but the Hype Machine pulls together no fewer than 100 different blogs classified as such. It’s loaded with music, all hand-selected by Internet tastemakers and guaranteed to introduce you to something you haven’t heard before. A Growing Universe Of Music Discovery AppsNarrowing this list to just five selections wasn’t easy. There are plenty of discovery apps on Spotify worth checking out – top charts from We Are Hunted and Billboard and social music from TweetVine, Soundrop and Sifter. Depending on your tastes, the critic-curated recommendations from Pitchfork, Rolling Stone, NME or KCRW can be invaluable. It’s also worth mentioning that the new, supposedly Pandora-killing Spotify Radio feature is worth playing with. Its Echo Nest-powered recommendations are not quite as granular and effective as Pandora’s, but they’re quite good. Not only can you create a station based on any album or artist, but you can build one off of an entire playlist. This is pretty powerful. For instance, if you’ve starred a lot of music on Spotify, you can build a radio station based solely on those favorites. Here’s another Spotify Radio trick: The Last.fm app will let you generate a Spotify a playlist based on your dozen or so most-played  albums of all time. You can then start a Spotify radio station based on that playlist, which is sure to contain a few tracks you’ll love, but have never heard before. And isn’t that the point of music discovery?center_img 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Related Posts last_img read more