10 million acres added to Chile’s national park system

first_imgArticle published by Erik Hoffner Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Conservation, conservation players, Habitat, Habitat Loss, Happy-upbeat Environmental, National Parks, Protected Areas, Wildlife center_img The announcement marked the culmination of a plan agreed to in March 2017 by President Bachelet and Kristine McDivitt Tompkins, President and CEO of Tompkins Conservation, to create a network of five new national parks in Chile, and the expansion of three others.As a herd of guanacos grazed in the distance, Chilean President Michelle Bachelet declared, “With these beautiful lands, their forests, their rich ecosystems, [we] expand the network of parks to more than 10 million acres. Thus, national parklands in Chile will increase by 38.5% to account for 81.1% of Chile’s protected areas.”Tompkins Conservation is a US-based foundation aimed at preventing biodiversity loss and added 1 million acres to the deal — it was founded by Kristine and Doug Tompkins, business leaders of clothing brands The North Face, Esprit, and Patagonia. Yesterday, as a herd of guanacos grazed in the distance, Chilean President Michelle Bachelet declared, “With these beautiful lands, their forests, their rich ecosystems, [we] expand the network of parks to more than 10 million acres. Thus, national parklands in Chile will increase by 38.5% to account for 81.1% of Chile’s protected areas.”A buzzard eagle soared above as a guanaco in the grasslands behind her took a dust bath in seeming approval.The announcement marked the culmination of a plan agreed to in March 2017 by Bachelet and Kristine McDivitt Tompkins, President and CEO of Tompkins Conservation,  to create a network of five new national parks in Chile, and the expansion of three others.Tompkins Conservation is a US-based foundation aimed at preventing biodiversity loss and was founded by Kristine and Doug Tompkins, business leaders of clothing brands The North Face, Esprit, and Patagonia. Doug Tompkins passed away after a kayaking accident on Chile’s Lake General Carrera in 2015, and Kristine has carried the mission forward.“I am proud of my husband Doug and his vision which continues to guide us, in addition to our entire team, for completing these two national parks and the broader network, a major milestone of our first 25 years of work,” Tompkins said during the signing. “While we will continue to help promote and safeguard these parks, we are beginning to turn our attention [to] new conservation and rewilding projects in Chile and Argentina as we work to save and restore big, wild, and connected ecosystems.”Chile adds Tompkins Conservation’s million acres to 9 million acres of its own federal land. The signed decrees create Pumalín National Park and Patagonia National Park Chile.Read our March 2017 interview with Kristine Tompkins to learn more about the genesis of this project here.Kristine Tompkins and President Michelle Bachelet sign a pledge in March 2017 to expand national parkland in Chile by 10 million acres. Source: Tompkins Conservation.Banner photo: Pumalín Park, via Tompkins ConservationFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post.last_img read more

Indonesian palm, pulp companies commit to peatland restoration

first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong Some 125 palm oil and pulp companies have committed to restoring a combined 14,000 square kilometers (5,400 square miles) of degraded peatlands that fall within their leases over the next eight years.The move is part of government-driven efforts to prevent a repeat of the massive land and forest fires that flared up in 2015, largely as a result of peatlands being drained for planting and rendered highly combustible.At the heart of the rehabilitation work is the extensive blocking of drainage canals, which aims to restore moisture to the peat soil. JAKARTA — More than a hundred palm oil and pulp companies in Indonesia have pledged to restore a combined area of peat forest the size of the state of Connecticut, in response to government measures to prevent a repeat of the disastrous fires of 2015.Eighty of the companies are palm oil planters and 45 are pulp and paper firms, according to the Ministry of Environment and Forestry. Of these, 49 palm oil companies and 31 pulp companies have had their plans approved by the ministry.Karliansyah, the ministry’s head of environmental pollution and damage control, thanked the pulp companies in particular for cooperating with the ministry since late last year to finalize restoration plans for peatlands that lie inside their leases. Those companies have agreed to block the canals initially dug to drain the peatlands in preparation for planting, and to rehabilitate nearly 5,200 square kilometers (2,000 square miles) of degraded peatlands.Together with the palm oil companies, they plan to restore at least 14,000 square kilometers (5,400 square miles) of their concessions that fall within protected areas by 2026.The restoration project is mandated by the Indonesian government under various policies, issued in the wake of the 2015 fires, to protect the carbon-rich peat forests.Land and forest fires have been an annual occurrence in the country over the past two decades, and peaked in 2015 with widespread blazes and a resultant massive haze, stoked in large part by the drainage of Indonesia’s vast peat swamps that rendered them highly combustible. Combined with slash-and-burn clearing, the results proved disastrous.Smoke from the fires that year sickened half a million Indonesians, according to government estimates, and drifted into neighboring countries. At the height of the disaster, the daily emissions of carbon dioxide as a result of the burning exceeded those from all U.S. economic activity.Karliansyah, who, like many Indonesians, goes by one name, said it was crucial that the companies make good on their commitments in order to avoid a disaster on a similar scale.“Next year, we’ll face a dry season,” he said. “Hopefully, these companies can encourage other companies” to do the same.Indonesia’s weather agency is predicting drier-than-usual conditions in parts of the country starting in May, as a result of the La Niña weather system, which raises the risk of fires breaking out and sustaining.Key to preventing this is blocking the drainage canals and allowing the soil to retain water once again. The goal is to ensure that the peat layer stays moist down to a government-mandated 40 centimeters (16 inches) below the surface, Karliansyah said.“I see some companies have managed to do that. Around 70 percent have met the standard. So the risk [of fires] can be reduced,” he said.Among those that have committed to the initiative is PT Satria Perkasa Agung, a pulp and paper company that operates in Sumatra’s Riau province, the region worst-affected by the fires and haze in 2015. The company has pledged to conserve the 254 square kilometers (98 square miles) of protected areas that account for a third of its concession.“The key to our success in optimizing our productivity is preventing forest fires, managing water levels and implementing silviculture,” said company representative Hendri Tanjung, referring to the practice of developing and nurturing forests.This private sector-led initiative is part of the wider peat protection policy rolled out by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo with the idea that rehabilitating peatlands by wetting peat soil and planting peat-friendly crops will make them less prone to fires.In 2016, the president established an agency, called the BRG, to spearhead nationwide efforts to restore 20,000 square kilometers (7,720 square miles) of degrade peatland by 2019; announced a moratorium on the draining of peat swamps; and issued his signature piece of anti-haze regulation, which calls for, among other things, companies to conserve peat areas within their concessions.Under this regulation, pulp and paper companies can see their crops through to the end of the current harvest cycle, at which point they must restore the peatlands by blocking drainage canals, maintaining the water level and planting native vegetation. Plantation companies will be allowed to keep operating in peat areas until their permits expire, at which point they must commence their restoration plans. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Banner image: A peat swamp in Sumatra smolders during the 2015 haze crisis. Drainage canals are dug through the peat to prepare the land for planting with oil palms, but the practice renders the soil highly combustible. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Ecological Restoration, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forestry, Forests, Indonesia, Peatlands, Plantations, Protected Areas, Pulp And Paper, Rainforests, Restoration, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Making mountains out of molehills: system builds public-access big data from many sources

first_imgBig Data, data, Research, Technology, Wildtech Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored How and where to store, manage, and share increasingly large data sets challenges scientists across disciplines.Like a library network for scientific data, the Data Observation Network for Earth (DataONE) links member data repositories to ensure open and secure access to well-described and easily discovered Earth observational data.The network provides guidelines and tools for researchers to document and preserve their data and make them available for future users to expand studies across time periods and locations. What if we had a public library for scientific data?The proliferation of sensors monitoring the Earth—from space to planes, drones, vehicles, park rangers, camera traps, and even animal tracking collars—has generated so much information that researchers now need new technology to access and manage it.Scientists are increasingly uploading data to online platforms for storing and sharing genetic, taxonomic, and spatial data—such as Movebank, GenBank, Barcode Of Life Data systems (BOLD), Wildbook, CollectEarth, Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), and Map4Environment.Forest along the Kinabatagan River in Sabah, Malaysia. Scientists increasingly rely on shared data sets to study complex systems and ecological processes. Photo credit: George PowellAs part of U.S. President Obama’s Big Data Initiative, the National Science Foundation (NSF) supported the formation of the Data Observation Network for Earth (DataONE). This network of data repositories came together in 2012 to address the growing need to manage vast amounts of diverse scientific data and make them available for science.And like a library system, DataONE formalizes collaboration among these data centers to help scientists with three main big data challenges:Preserving and storing their data securely over time;Finding reliable data sets to help address large-scale and long-term research questions; andVisualizing and analyzing large amounts of data.These issues are “especially important now as we deal with challenges that are long-term in nature, things like climate change, major movements of populations into new areas, and long-lasting droughts,” said William Michener, DataONE principal investigator from the University of New Mexico, in a news release.Linking institutions and data Similar to a library that stores books from different time periods on various aspects of a research subject, a network of data banks stores and manages data sets from research conducted at different times and places for future use beyond the initial project.DataONE maintains and provides access to data through over 40 member data repositories where researchers can upload a data set for future use, by themselves or others. Member institutions—typically government, NGO, or university data centers or long-term research projects—preserve and provide access to contributed datasets, share data with the rest of the DataONE community, and facilitate data search and discovery by researchers, libraries, funders, and other repositories.Giraffes at dawn in Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park. Photo credit: George Powell“A major growth area in science is developing an infrastructure that enables scientists to tackle…grand challenge questions. I think that is the future, data-enabled, data-intensive science,” Michener said.Most DataONE member institutions store data on climate, forests, oceanography, biodiversity, and ecosystem processes, though the member data repositories vary in size and data type. “In the first phase of DataONE, we concentrated on repositories with environmental and biodiversity observational data,” said Rebecca Koskela, DataONE’s Executive Director, in an email. “[W]e added some social science data to the network through the Minnesota Population Center. We also have archeology data with the addition of the tDAR (the Digital Archeological Record).”Sharing of data sets allows researchers to generate new information in a way not possible until recent advancements in computing and communications. For example, scientists can increasingly study species, habitats, or processes across multiple places and time periods using multi-national, long-term data sets.However, once scientists publish the results of a given study or complete their PhD, they often lack a plan for the longer-term role their data may play.“Historically, most individual scientists have collected their data, they put it onto spreadsheets….those spreadsheets go onto a laptop, and they may be lost over time,” Michener said. “These data are often considered ‘orphan’ data. They have no one to take care of them, and they often disappear several years after the project is completed.”Tree fern in cloud forest interior, Costa Rica. Combining research data on multiple species can help future scientists understand ecological patterns. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriTools to expand data’s contribution to scienceDataONE provides tools to enhance the usefulness of these data by helping scientists to:properly format data spreadsheets through a system that analyzes files, identifies problems, and offers solutions to preserve their utility over the long-term; andupload the cleaned-up orphan data with some associated descriptive information to a specific repository, to help other scientists use them in the future. “A good 95% of the data that has been collected as part of science is orphan data, much of which has been lost and we can no longer retrieve,” Michener said.More generally, DataONE helps its member nodes prepare, catalog, and describe their data to make them available to future users as “self-describing data sets” to address long-term, large-scale research questions.Accurate and complete metadata makes a data set more easily discovered and used, which enables replication of the technique in the future. However, researchers frequently do not fully describe where, when, and how the data were collected.Anthias in Bunaken National Park, Sabah, Malaysia. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriThe DataONE network has created educational materials to help researchers create metadata, develop data management plans, and prepare their data for long-term storage. For example, an “Investigator Toolkit” offers access to customized tools that help scientists plan and carry out their data collection, as well as process, store and share information once they’ve collected it. The network website also records tutorials and monthly webinars and makes them freely available online.Linking data banks enables users to search for a wide range of information from a single access point. The network also makes the data available through an outreach program to increase the involvement of educators, students, and the interested public in data collection, management, and analysis.Joining a network can also benefit institutions by broadening the reach of the data they preserve, offering assistance in managing their data, and facilitating access to other data repositories and potential collaborators. Members can also opt to share certain project data with just specified collaborators.A hard-to-find Doherty’s bushshrike in Uganda. Data sets from multiple studies can help identify changes in species distributions over time. Photo credit: George PowellDataONE requires certain capacities of its members to ensure long-term access to resources. Each institution must maintain and ensure access to the data sets over the long term, follow good curation and documentation practices, and use standardized metadata to describe data sets. Special software helps catalog and synchronize the data resources of each new member node.“The repository selects which software stack that they will use to become a Member Node (our recommendation is to use the Generic Member Node software),” said Koskela. “The software is installed, testing occurs on our testing environment, and if testing is successful, the Member Node goes into production.”The joining process is described on the DataONE website. Members initiate the request to join DataONE, said Koskela, but the limiting factor in adding more members is resources.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Sue Palminterilast_img read more

Analysis: U.S. call to drill off all coasts, economic and ecological folly?

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change Denial, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Featured, Fisheries, Fishing, Fossil Fuels, Gas, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Green, Habitat Degradation, Health, Impact Of Climate Change, Law, Natural Gas, Oceans, Oil, Oil Drilling, Oil Spills, Pollution, Public Health, Saltwater Fish, Trade, Water Crisis, Water Pollution 90 billion barrels of recoverable oil, plus 327 trillion cubic feet of natural gas lie untapped offshore on the U.S. continental shelf. In January, the Trump administration ordered that the entire coast, in the Pacific, Atlantic, Gulf, and Arctic, be opened to drilling.Environmentalists and the coastal states fear oil spills that could devastate tourism. They also are concerned about the massive infrastructure (pipelines, terminals, refineries, pumping stations and more) that would be needed to support the industry.The executive branch has moved forward with efficiency to create a surge in U.S. oil and gas production: the Interior and Energy departments, and the Environmental Protection Agency have all worked to slash regulations and open additional lands and seas to oil and gas exploration, with the plan of achieving U.S. “energy dominance” around the globe.Most coastal states are resisting the federal oil and gas offshore drilling plan; Florida has already been exempted, while other states are likely to fight back with lawsuits. The irony is that a flood of new U.S. oil could glut the market and drive prices down, resulting in an economic disaster for the industry. A 1926 picture of oil drilling at Huntington Beach California, makes clear what can happen when fossil fuel production goes completely unregulated. California has substantial oil reserves offshore, as do many U.S. coastal states. Photo courtesy of Orange County ArchivesFor generations the U.S. oil and gas industry has dreamed of the forbidden deep. For hundreds of miles along all four American coasts – the Atlantic, Gulf, Arctic, and Pacific – the continental shelf slopes gradually downward until it falls away abruptly, into the abyssal depths. Beneath that shelf’s sediments lie riches.According to estimates by the Interior Department’s Bureau of Ocean Management there are 90 billion barrels of undiscovered technically recoverable oil plus 327 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of natural gas down there – a potential fortune in petro profits, and a climatologist’s worst nightmare.But for generations, that oil and gas has been off limits. Drilling has been banned off the Atlantic Coast since the early 1980s, and off the west coast of Florida since 1988. It is also banned off the Pacific Coast, where the 1969 Santa Barbara spill helped start the environmental movement. That leaves only part of the Gulf – off Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama – open to drilling.However, the restrictions on American offshore oil and gas production has always been precarious; the executive branch has complete authority to decide what happens in the federal waters of the outer continental shelf, from 3 to 200 miles out to sea.The Sabine Pass LNG export terminal. The so-called “shale revolution” led to such a flood of oil and gas – eventually the country was producing 10 million barrels a day – that the Obama Administration reversed a forty year ban on gas exports. Photo by Roy LuckThen came TrumpPresident Obama briefly considered reopening the southeast Atlantic Coast to drilling in 2010, but local outcry and the catastrophic Deepwater Horizon spill quashed that plan.The Trump Administration is thinking bigger: much bigger. As part of its goal for achieving “energy dominance,” it is moving full-steam ahead to open up the entire U.S. coastline to drilling. In January, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke submitted his new federal lease 5-year plan, which would open up the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic coasts to drilling.Where Obama restricted drilling to about 6 percent of U.S. waters, Zinke would open it to more than 90 percent.And while the details of the new leasing plan are being developed, the administration is moving fast to sell already sanctioned offshore resources: on Wednesday, March 21, the Interior Department will host what it is marketing as the largest ever federal lease sale in American history, an all-you-can-buy event in which 77 million acres of the Gulf Coast – an offshore area the size of New Mexico – will be up for sale to oil and gas companies wanting to drill.As chaotic as the Trump administration has been on some issues, the Executive branch has moved forward with efficiency to create a surge in U.S. oil and gas production: Interior Department Secretary Ryan Zinke, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt, and Energy Department Secretary Rick Perry have all worked in unison to slash regulations and open additional lands and seas to unleash a flood of oil and gas exploration and production in the hopes of achieving U.S. “energy dominance” around the globe.The phrase, “energy dominance,” seems to have originated in a speech made by candidate Trump in North Dakota – an epicenter for U.S. oil and gas hydraulic fracking, and the site of the Standing Rock anti-pipeline camps. Though the so-called oil shale revolution has produced so much U.S. crude that Obama ended the country’s forty-plus year ban on oil exports, Trump wants more. “American energy dominance,” he told the crowd in Bismarck, “will be declared a strategic, economic and foreign policy goal of the United States. It’s about time!”Donald Trump’s Secretary of the Interior, Ryan Zinke has worked to slash environmental regulations and open up public lands and coastal waters for drilling in accordance with the administration goal of achieving “energy dominance” Photo courtesy US Department of the InteriorIn a Washington Times op-ed pegged to Trump’s June 2017 “Energy Week” observance, cabinet members Zinke, Pruitt and Perry defined the concept further: “An energy-dominant America means a self-reliant and secure nation, free from the geopolitical turmoil of other nations that seek to use energy as an economic weapon… an energy-dominant America will export to markets around the world, increasing our global leadership and influence.”Back in March 2017, Trump signed an executive order reviewing “All Agency Actions that Potentially Burden the Safe, Efficient Development of Domestic Energy Resources.” Under this authority, Zinke, Pruitt and Perry launched a dizzying array of rollbacks to Obama era environmental policies, slashed regulations and opened federal lands and waters to drilling.In the deregulation category, EPA sought to kill a rule requiring oil and gas companies to report methane emissions; also on the chopping block were rules to limit CO2 from new or modified power plants (a component of the Obama Clean Power Plan); rules to regulate coal ash; and a rule that applies Clean Water Act protections to small streams.The Interior Department moved fast to make federal lands and waters more attractive to industry. It cut royalties on new offshore rigs by a third, to their lowest allowable rate; it reopened federal land to new coal leases, and then, in coordination with the coal industry, worked to reopen a tax loophole that Obama had closed for valuing coal mined on federal lands. It also opened more federal land to drilling – recommending that the administration shrink the Bears Ears and Staircase Escalante National Monuments, and holding lease auctions on vast swaths of Western lands.A mobile offshore drilling unit (foreground) attempts to drill a relief well to relieve pressure at the site of the BP Deepwater Horizon blowout. Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley / US Coast GuardOffshore lease saleStill, the biggest shift came on the coasts. The Trump Interior Department revised the Obama-era five year offshore drilling plan meant to guide policy from 2017-2022, and will now allow new drilling in the Gulf, which Obama had largely restricted after the BP Deepwater Horizon accident.The first Trump offshore lease auction, in August 2017 raised $121 million. Meanwhile, the administration continues extolling next week’s 77 million acre New Orleans offshore lease auction in Trumpian marketing terms: as the biggest ever.However, Athan Manuel, director of the Sierra Club’s Lands Protection Program, downplays the March sale’s significance. He told the Washington Post back in October that the sale wasn’t really news – just what Obama had proposed, plus a few percent.The gulf, Manuel explained, has long been “a sacrifice zone for the oil and gas industry.” Virtually all of America’s offshore oil and gas rigs (providing about 17 percent of U.S. production) are along the Gulf Coast, as is almost half of the country’s refinery capacity; a fact that the country was unhappily reminded of when it was all shut down during Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Fully three-quarters of America’s fuel is refined on the Gulf Coast, and susceptible to climate change intensified storms and sea level rise – an issue unaddressed by the current Interior Department plan.Northstar Island, a 5-acre artificial island used for drilling oil in the Beaufort Sea, six miles off the Alaska Coast. Northstar was built in 1999 by Royal Dutch Shell; the company had to build an island because Arctic Ocean pack ice made it impossible to utilize Gulf of Mexico-style drilling rigs. After an Obama moratorium, the Trump Administration announced its intention to reopen drilling in the Beaufort Sea. Photo courtesy of the US Joint Pipeline OfficeDrilling every coastal stateIn January 2018, Interior’s Zinke went much further: for Trump’s 2019-2024 energy plan, he proposed opening drilling on the entire outer continental shelf, on all four coasts.“By proposing to open up nearly the entire OCS [Outer Continental Shelf] for potential oil and gas exploration, the United States can advance the goal of moving from aspiring for energy independence to attaining energy dominance,” explained Vincent DeVito, the Interior Department’s Counselor for Energy Policy.Almost all coastal state governors, whether Republican or Democrat, responded with staunch opposition. Some like Republican Governor Larry Horgan of Maryland, threatened legal action, with good reason. Most of the economies and tax bases of these shore states rely on tourism, along with commercial and recreational fishing. Florida brings in about $50 billion annually from tourists; the Jersey Shore earns nearly $44 billion. A March 7 study by Oceana International found that 2.6 million jobs and nearly $180 billion in GDP in coastal states are “ocean-dependent.”The governors logically fear the potential impacts of a BP Deepwater Horizon–style spill, which gutted the Gulf tourism industry, a business which rivals the offshore oil industry in revenue. The states are also concerned over the dirty development oil and gas drilling and refining would bring onshore.“In order to accommodate offshore drilling, a whole host of infrastructure is required to pump, move and process that oil,” explained Diane Hoskins, the anti-offshore drilling campaign director at Oceana. “And that’s not something coastal communities want – [they] don’t want to turn beach towns into oil towns.” Since Zinke’s announcement, she reports, 200 coastal municipalities have passed resolutions against offshore drilling.Another fear, specific to the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, is the ever more powerful hurricanes, super-rain events, and storm surges brought by a warming world. During Hurricane Harvey, the unprecedented rains – with multi-day downpours totaling 5 feet in some areas – submerged tank farms and Superfund sites, causing 22,000 barrels of oil and refined chemicals to leak, as well as 365 tons of toxic gas releases, including toxic benzene. Rising sea levels also put coastal oil and gas infrastructure increasingly at risk.A spill in the Arctic could be even worse. Rear Admiral Jonathan White, former Navy chief oceanographer, and head of its climate change task force, told Scientific American: “The East Coast, West Coast, anywhere in the world except the Arctic, you can get [cleanup] booms, you can get platforms, you can get people and material there,” he said. “In the Arctic, it’s almost like trying to get it to the moon in some cases.” White noted that there is no known or approved procedure for getting oil off ice.The Trump administration seems willing to take these environmental risks for what amounts to very little energy dominance: Oceana estimates the oil reserves off the Atlantic, Pacific, and Florida Gulf coasts are only enough to last the country 2 years; the natural gas offshore reserve would be gone in just a year.Fireboat crews work to extinguish the burning wreckage of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil platform. The disaster – one of the worst ecological catastrophes in U.S. history ¬¬– cost billions to local tourism and spread fears of the dangers of offshore drilling. Photo Courtesy of the US Coast GuardA half-cooked energy plan?The Trump administration has a problem: while the federal government wields unchallenged authority in federal waters, it will still need the full backing of coastal state governments for its leasing plans: oil drillers will need to get state infrastructure permits to build oil and gas terminals, pipelines, pumping stations and refineries to support offshore drilling.In recognition of that reality, Secretary Zinke said he was willing to negotiate the opening of 94 percent of U.S. waters to drilling: “The states, local communities, and congressional delegations will all have a say,” he stated. After Florida Republican Governor Rick Scott tweeted that he and Zinke were going to have to meet, its coast was exempted from the coming statewide lease sale.For everyone else, the public comment period for the 2019-2024 plan closed on March 9. Those federal comment sessions, Oceana’s Hoskins noted, tended to be held inland, far from affected coastal communities. While Zinke has promised to listen to all stakeholders, he is sticking to the Trump fossil fuel talking points: “We want to grow our nation’s offshore energy industry, instead of slowly surrendering it to foreign shores.”What many analysts find perplexing about Trump’s “energy dominance” policy is that while it appears to benefit big oil and gas, it could well threaten the industry. That’s because the industry’s most recent crisis came not from lack of drilling, but from over production. A January article in Forbes titled “Trump’s American Energy Dominance Agenda Becoming Reality” unintentionally highlighted this paradox, opening with a note that the outlook for American oil is strong, precisely because “the U.S. rig count remains remarkably stable.” That is, because the country’s producers aren’t exploring for more oil or drilling new wells.Here’s what precipitated the recent crisis: Starting in mid 2014, the country’s thousands of independent oil and gas producers, hoping to take advantage of oil prices above $100 per barrel, began aggressively fracking the West, releasing a flood of domestic American oil. That drilling frenzy – combined with the Saudis’ decision to open their taps – created an oil glut that brought world oil prices down to an early-2016 nadir of $26 a barrel, far below the price that could justify renewed exploration and development, particularly in the expensive and hazardous offshore domain.It took a year for oil prices to rally back to $50 a barrel. And then oil and gas companies once again crashed prices in what Forbes called a “self-destructive rush to increase drilling.” It took a combined multilateral deal between Russia and OPEC, and a lot of meetings in American energy company boardrooms, to limit supply.The industry calls this need for careful control, “capital discipline,” a business strategy of restricting supply sufficiently to push prices into the $60-70 range, where they are today. But the Trump administration’s energy policy threatens to rapidly ramp up production on-land and offshore, shattering all attempts at capital discipline, putting the industry economically at risk.A US Coast Guard cutter moves through sea ice in Alaska’s Beaufort Sea. Senior Coast Guard officials have warned that they do not have the capacity to clean up an oil spill in the harsh environment of the Arctic Ocean. Photo courtesy of the Coast GuardWill big oil and gas buy in?According to Lorne Stockman of Oil Change International, a think-tank focused on the post-carbon economy, it isn’t clear how popular the new offshore leases will be with fossil fuel companies, particularly outside those areas of the Gulf already crowded with rigs and infrastructure.Developing new offshore areas, as Zinke’s plan proposes, will require a huge investment by the firms to establish new offshore and onshore infrastructure – new drilling platforms, underwater and underground pipelines, terminals, and refineries would all need to be built.The Gulf already has this infrastructure, and even with that, according to a recent Oil Change International (OCI) study, profits are slim; 76 percent of new Gulf offshore leases, and 45 percent nationwide, are only breaking even, and that’s with the help of federal subsidies. “If you’re in the already crowded parts of the Gulf,” Stockman explains, “the break-even price could be $50 to $70 a barrel; if you’re breaking into completely new areas, it’ll be $70, $80, upwards.”On the Arctic frontier, the costs are even more prohibitive: the last serious attempt to drill offshore in the Arctic was when Royal Dutch Shell tried to drill in the remote Beaufort Sea in 2015, which ended with the company spending $7 billion on a dry hole. On land, fracking is barely a break-even enterprise: 60 percent of the oil in the Bakken shale, in North Dakota, is subsidy dependent, according to OCI.Stockman questions the economic prudence of any company undertaking offshore development in states where no production is presently occurring: “Drilling an [onshore] shale well takes $20 million. Flip a switch and drill it tomorrow, or hold till next month when prices are better,” he said. However, “An investment offshore is a multibillion multi-year enterprise.“A FEMA flyover of a damaged refinery after 2005’s Hurricane Rita. The growing intensity of hurricanes in the Gulf threatens to overwhelm America’s refinery infrastructure, almost half of which is on the Gulf. During Hurricane Harvey, tens of thousands of barrels of oil spilled from flooded refineries. Photo by Leif SkoogforsInvestment in energy dominance, or a political scam?Given these financials, it seems logical to ask why the industry wants a massive offshore expansion. “Well, that’s the question,” Stockman laughs. “Is it even something they do want?”The push to open all U.S. waters to drilling, he explains, has been an industry dream for decades, but as such, it is also a relic of the wildcatting past – a desire that recurs from time-to-time, as it did in the 1970s and early 2000s, when it was believed American oil and gas were in long term decline, with its only way forward the production of ever more remote and expensive fields.The boom in shale gas and oil flipped this paradigm on its head, as has the little publicized, but real, slow downtick in demand for oil, with greater declines forecast if advances in electric and automated vehicles come to fruition. (Vehicles currently account for about 60 percent of oil consumption.)The oil industry and finance press has already begun to speculate that the world may be past, or fast approaching “peak oil demand.” And looming over all this economic talk – as markets and insurers are beginning to realize – is the fact that the world’s store of technically recoverable oil and gas resources cannot be burned without catastrophically destabilizing the planet’s climate.With all that in mind, the industry has shown little inclination to develop new fields – exploration is at a 70 year low. “I’m not saying expanded offshore development isn’t potentially gonna happen one day,” Stockman says, “but in a typical Trump administration move, they’ve ruled on the industry’s agenda without much insight of whether it’s something of particular importance at this moment.”One irony concerning American oil and gas is that, while its proponents say they love \ the free market, much of the industry is heavily reliant on federal subsidies, as this Oil Change International map makes clear. Image courtesy of Oil Change InternationalSo it is, that America awaits the results of the biggest federal oil and gas lease sale ever. But whatever bids are made next Wednesday, and in upcoming lease sales, that doesn’t mean we’ll see drilling tomorrow. Purchased leases need to be seen for what they are: long term planning. Leases approved in 2017, for example, won’t start making money until 2027 at the earliest, and there is no telling what the world energy landscape will look like then.Still, Stockman adds, the expansion into America’s oceans makes sense in terms of speculation. It’s a way for oil and gas companies to lock down acreage they may or may not ever develop, just in case oil prices spike again. And, as New York financiers investing in barely solvent fracking companies have learned to their displeasure, drilling is, for the companies, to some extent an end in itself.“The industry is eternally optimistic about its future,” Stockman concludes. “They completely dismiss the prospect of climate policy becoming a challenge, and they completely dismiss hard economic data that more efficient vehicles and EVs will take their market share away. So it’s completely in their framework to say, ‘Sure, we want to start expanding into new areas that might require $100 [per barrel] oil in the mid-2020s, because that’s how we see the future.’ And given the current administration you can’t blame them.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

150 years after being discovered, African monkey with handlebar moustache becomes its own species

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored An African monkey first described to science more than 150 years ago has now been elevated to full species status.The Blue Nile patas monkey is found in the Blue Nile basin of Ethiopia as well as in eastern Sudan. Its range is geographically distinct from that of other patas monkeys, as Sudan’s Sudd swamp region and the Ethiopian highlands isolate the Blue Nile patas in the extreme northeast end of patas monkeys’ known distribution range.Patas monkeys are ground-dwellers and the fastest runners amongst all primates, capable of reaching more than 30 miles per hour. They were, up until now, considered to be one species, Erythrocebus patas — the only species within the genus Erythrocebus. Or at least it was the only recognized species in the genus until Erythrocebus poliophaeus, the Blue Nile patas monkey, was recently elevated to full species status by Spartaco Gippoliti, a scientist with the IUCN SSC Primate Specialist Group.The Blue Nile patas monkey has a black face and nose as well as a tuft of fur below its nose that looks distinctly like a white handlebar moustache. The species does not, however, have the band between ears and eyes that is characteristic of other patas monkeys.Gippoliti wrote in a recent study published in the journal Primate Conservation that “New data on the distribution and physical appearance of patas monkeys in Ethiopia, together with a review of the old taxonomic literature, allows to us disentangle some questions concerning the taxonomy of Erythrocebus in northeast Africa.”Adult male Blue Nile Patas Monkey (Erythrocebus poliophaeus), Beijing Zoo. Photo courtesy of Jonas Livet.The Blue Nile patas monkey was first described and given the name Erythrocebus poliophaeus in 1862. But a taxonomic revision of Erythrocebus was done in 1927, and it was erroneously determined at that time that the genus was monotypic, meaning it consisted of just one species.According to Gipolliti, “Given the huge distributional range of Erythrocebus, it seems unlikely that the current monotypic classification describes the diversity of the genus correctly, all the more since other savannah dwelling African primate genera, such as Papio and Chlorocebus, comprise multiple species.” Even in 1927, there were enough differences observed among various populations of patas monkeys that three subspecies were identified — and a fourth subspecies was added in 1950.In 2008, the IUCN assessed Erythrocebus patas as a monotypic genus with no subspecies and classified it as a species of Least Concern. This was “undoubtedly the result of the deficient current taxonomy, the ample geographic range and the scarcity of research,” Gippoliti writes in the study. “Further, savannah primate species are generally believed to be less at risk than forest primates, but this is clearly an oversimplification that may be encouraged by an excessively-lumped alpha taxonomy.”Gippoliti adds that, though the results are still unpublished, Erythrocebus patas was reassessed as Near Threatened by the IUCN in 2016. The conservation status of the three subspecies initially recognized in 1927 were also assessed, for the first time ever. Erythrocebus patas patas was found to be Near Threatened, E. baumstarki to be Critically Endangered, and E. pyrrhonotus to be Vulnerable.Blue Nile Patas Monkey (Erythrocebus poliophaeus). Illustration by Stephen NashGippoliti notes in the study that Erythrocebus poliophaeus is threatened by habitat loss, and that while we still know very little about the extent of its range, the species’ distribution is “certainly limited” and therefore “the species is a cause for conservation concern.” But Gippoliti also argues that, now that it’s been established as taxonomically distinct, the monkey could serve as something of a flagship species to help spur the conservation of the wildlands of Ethiopia and Sudan.“Refining the taxonomy of the patas monkey was particularly rewarding for two main reasons,” he said in a statement. “The basic concept of the genus Erythrocebus was unchanged for about 100 years now, and the discovery of a distinct species living in eastern Sudan and western Ethiopia will put in the spotlight a little-known region of Africa, offering opportunities for new conservation projects in the area.”Gippoliti detailed his findings in an issue of Primate Conservation published at the end of 2017. The Blue Nile patas monkey is just one of several discoveries reported in that issue. Among the others is Grove’s dwarf lemur, found in Madagascar, and two new species of tarsier found on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi.Anthony Rylands, primate conservation director for Global Wildlife Conservation, also serves as deputy chair of the IUCN SSC Primate Specialist Group, which publishes the journal Primate Conservation. He said in a statement that “Patas monkeys occur west to east across sub-Saharan Africa, and there is notable variation in these remarkable primates. It’s only through this kind of painstaking research that we get a proper handle on their diversity so that we can more effectively protect these species from the threats they face.”Adult male Blue Nile Patas Monkey (Erythrocebus poliophaeus), Beijing Zoo. Photo courtesy of Jonas Livet.CITATIONS• Gippoliti, S. (2017). On the Taxonomy of Erythrocebus with a Re-evaluation of Erythrocebus poliophaeus (Reichenbach, 1862) from the Blue Nile Region of Sudan and Ethiopia. Primate Conservation, 31, 53-59.• Kingdon, J., Butynski, T.M. & De Jong, Y. 2008. Erythrocebus patas. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2008: e.T8073A12884516. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T8073A12884516.en. Downloaded on 16 March 2018.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Conservation, Environment, Mammals, Monkeys, New Discovery, Primates, Rediscovered Species, Species Discovery, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

BUSINESSES LOO-SING OUT OVER LOCATION OF PUBLIC TOILETS

first_imgLetterkenny Town Council is planning to move its public toilet in a bid to make it flush with users.Flushing money down the toilet! Council is planning to move Letterkenny loo.The portaloo is currently located in the car park at Justice Walsh Road behind the AIB bank.But Cllr. Gerry McMonagle says it’s practically a white elephant and very few people are paying to use it. Last year it was revealed the town’s two toilets were costing €26,000 to operate – meaning it was costing the council more than €7.40 for each person who tinkled!The Sinn Fein councillor brought a motion before last night’s meeting asking to move the toilet close to the Port Roundabout.He said people traveling to and from Dublin are often waiting on buses for ten to fifteen minutes before moving further afield.“Businesses are being inundated with people asking to use the toilet,” Cllr. McMonagle told the council. He said that this is leading to high water charges for the businesses. He acknowledged that the council had created the transportation hub in the area, so the responsibility lies on them to provide toilet facilities.Cllr. Victor Fisher seconded the motion.He asked Town Clark Paddy Doherty how much money was being generated by the portaloos but he was unable to provide a figure.The large amount of third level students passing through the area was mentioned by Cllr. Dessie Larkin, who supported the motion. He commended the council’s work at creating a successful traffic system in the area.Cllr. McMonagle later told Donegal Daily that the portaloo was not paying for itself in its current setting, as the usage is minimal. He said that the facility would generate more revenue in the carpark at Mr. Chippy. by Rachel McLaughlinBUSINESSES LOO-SING OUT OVER LOCATION OF PUBLIC TOILETS was last modified: September 10th, 2013 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Letterkenny Town CouncilmeetingportalooTOILETlast_img read more