Football legends pick the best between Ronaldo and Messi

first_img Kylian Mbappe – Verdict: Cristiano RonaldoMbappe is the youngest player to feature on this list and it’s interesting to see why he notes Ronaldo as his ‘GOAT’. “From one year to the next, my choice changes between Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi, even if I have to admit to picking Ronaldo more often. I loved him when I was younger,” he revealed. Zlatan Ibrahimovic – Verdict: Lionel MessiZlatan’s time at Barcelona was cut short due to Messi’s emergence but it’s safe to say it hasn’t swayed his opinion. Ronaldinho – Verdict: Lionel MessiRonaldinho played with a teenage Messi while he was breaking through at Barcelona and the Argentine forward inherited Ronaldinho’s number 10 shirt at the Nou Camp. “Messi. I would have loved to continue playing alongside him. I didn’t get enough time with him, he was very young. I’d love to take to the pitch with him one more time,” he revealed. “He’s the best in history, no doubt. Nobody has done what Messi’s done. The other one [Ronaldo] is complete, he has it all. So does Messi, but it’s a question of taste and I prefer Messi’s style.” Sir Alex Ferguson – Verdict: Cristiano RonaldoIt comes as no surprise that Sir Alex goes for former United winger Ronaldo who became one of the world’s best players plying his trade under the Scotsman. “Now don’t get me wrong, Messi is a fantastic player, it’s like he’s wearing slippers when he controls the ball,” Ferguson admitted. “But here, for me, is the difference. Messi is a Barcelona player. “But Ronaldo could play for Stockport County and score a hat-trick. He just wanted to be the best in the world.” Pele – Verdict: Cristiano RonaldoThe most recent example on this list, the World Cup winner explained he believes Ronaldo is the better player as he is ‘more consistent’. “Today the best player in the world is Cristiano Ronaldo,” the 79-year-old told YouTube channel Pilhado.“I think he’s the best, because he’s more consistent, but you can’t forget about [Lionel] Messi, of course, but he’s not a striker.”Diego Maradona – Verdict: Lionel MessiMaradona gives his vote to fellow Argentine Messi, who he also managed at international level. “I can’t remember having seen Lionel Messi play badly,’ he explained. “I prefer Messi to Cristiano Ronaldo but I acknowledge that the latter is an animal. Football history will remember Messi. Football has given him a lot, as much as he has given the sport and to win a World Cup, in my opinion, wouldn’t bring himself anything else.” A list of players who have chosen between Cristiano Ronaldo and Lionel Messi has been revealed. The duo have been inseparable since rising to the top of football just over a decade ago and have won dozens of trophies between them. “I think Messi is one of a kind. What he’s doing, I don’t know if we will see another player do the things that he does,” he said. “It is different [with Ronaldo] because he is the result of hard training. It is not natural.” It’s a topic that everyone has an opinion on so we’ll quickly rattle through a few more names below. David Beckham – Verdict: Lionel Messi “He [Messi] is alone in his class as a player, it is impossible that there is another like him. He, like Cristiano Ronaldo, who is not at his level, are both above the rest.” Paul Scholes – Verdict: Lionel Messi “Ronaldo scores, he takes free-kicks. But as an all-round footballer, Messi – wow, his passing – he has absolutely everything.” Fabio Capello – Verdict: Lionel Messi “Ronaldo’s an extraordinary footballer, but Messi is a genius. “There are three geniuses in football: Pele, Maradona and Messi. Period. Ronaldo is very strong as he helps you win everything, but Messi is a genius and the better player.” Promoted ContentThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The WorldThe Models Of Paintings Whom The Artists Were Madly In Love WithYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime7 Facts About Black Holes That Will Blow Your MindTop 9 Scariest Haunted Castles In EuropePlaying Games For Hours Can Do This To Your Body6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parkscenter_img Zinedine Zidane – Verdict: Cristiano Ronaldo “Cristiano is the best. Messi is his rival and it’s the rivalry everyone wants to see. But Ronaldo is phenomenal. There are no words to describe him. He is much better than me even though I had a great career. He’s the greatest of all time.” But the question of who is the better of the two reared it’s head again last week when Pele admitted he prefers Juve forward Ronaldo to Barca star Messi. The Daily Mail have uncovered a list players from the past and present who have weighed in on the debate and we’ve picked out the key figures. Read Also: Messi is greater than Maradona – Cassano Jurgen Klopp – Verdict: Lionel Messi “I have only one selfie on my smartphone,” he said. “That’s with Messi. Cristiano was in the room as well…” The ruling comes out at four votes for Ronaldo in comparison to eight for Messi. Who do you think is the better better of Ronaldo and Messi? FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… Ronaldo Nazario – Verdict: Lionel Messi “He (Messi) is out of this world. Cristiano, too, but I see Leo as more complete,” Ronaldo revealed. “He’s great. I like him much more than any other player. Everything he does is spectacular.”last_img read more

The toughest snake on Earth lives in central Africa and eats baby rodents

first_imgThe skin of the Calabar burrowing python is 15 times thicker and orders of magnitude harder to pierce than the average snake. The skin’s puncture resistance is owed to its layered sheets of collagen fibers.Scientists think the snake’s tough skin may have evolved to protect the snake from the bites of mother rodents defending their young, which make up the entirety of the Calabar’s diet.The snake’s skin is flexible despite being thick and nearly impenetrable. This unique combination of qualities has already intrigued a pharmaceutical company hoping to mimic its structure to create puncture-resistant medical gloves that don’t restrict movement. The fury of rodent mothers may have given rise to the toughest of all snakes.The skin of the Calabar burrowing python (Calabaria reinhardtii), a one-meter-long snake native to equatorial Africa, may be thicker and harder to pierce than any other snake in the world, according to a study due to be published in the January issue of the Journal of Morphology. The Calabar’s armor-like casing may have evolved to ward off biting attacks by the protective mothers of its exclusive prey: the pups of burrowing rodents.Snake skin, like human skin, has an outer epidermis and a deep dermis. In snakes, scales compose the outer layer. Typically, the deeper layer in both snakes and mammals is made up of disorganized bundles of collagen, arranged like loose piles of hay. This lack of structure makes skin quite elastic, but it’s also easily punctured or sliced.The Calabar python’s skin is remarkably different. The discovery arose from a bit of grisly serendipity, recalls study co-author Bruce Young, a biophysicist at A.T. Still University in the U.S. state of Missouri. The tightly packed scales of the Calabar burrowing python don’t spread apart when stretched. Photo Credit: Bruce Young.In 2015, Young and his colleagues were comparing the brain structures of different snakes. Their project required decapitating quite a few of them.“We had gotten this down to a science, but when we got to the Calabar we couldn’t do it,” Young told Mongabay. The razor blade that had easily sliced through every other snake met its match in the Calabar’s tough sheath of skin. A brand-new surgical scalpel and an extra helping of brute force finally separated the Calabar’s head from its body.Intrigued by the struggle, Young kept a bit of the snake’s skin to investigate what had rebuffed his blade. It was thicker than anything Young had come across, so the team took a close look at its structure.A research team led by Dawei Han of Truman State University, also in Missouri, pitted the Calabar’s skin against that of 13 other species of snake. They assessed its thickness with a microscope and its puncture resistance with hypodermic needles and a force transducer, which measured the pressure required to poke through the skin. Results showed that the Calabar’s skin was 15 times thicker and orders of magnitude harder to pierce than the skin of any other snake in the study.A scanning electron microscope created this image of a section of the Calabar’s skin. Photo Credit: Bruce Young.Under magnification, color-stained cross-sections of the skin revealed highly organized layers of collagen under the snake’s scales. Bundles of collagen in each layer ran perpendicularly to those above and below — a tough crisscross arrangement more similar to the hide of a rhinoceros than to the skin of other snakes.The work has surprised and delighted other herpetologists. “Most snakeskin has collagen fibers that run parallel. That organization allows the skin to stretch around a large meal or eggs,” says morphologist Alan Savitzky of Utah State University in the U.S. Savitzky has studied snakes for 35 years but was not involved in the present study. “These cross-ply fibers in the Calabar dramatically increase its strength but reduce its ability to stretch. It’s a very significant finding.”Despite its toughness, the snake’s skin remains flexible. This combination of pliability and puncture resistance has already piqued the interest of a pharmaceutical company seeking to make tougher medical gloves that don’t restrict movement. The company reached out to Han and Young for guidance in mimicking the underlying structure of the Calabar’s skin, according to the researchers.Several other aspects of the snake’s physiology have captured the attention of serpent aficionados. For instance, it looks like a “snake with two butts,” as described by Bruce Young’s 10-year-old daughter, because its head and tail look almost identical. Both ends of the Calabar are blunt and oblong — the head a bit thinner and the tail a bit thicker than the average snake’s. The snake presents its tail — shielded by the thickest skin on its body — to would-be assailants while burying its head beneath its coils.The Calabar python showcases what researchers call “cephalic mimicry,” which means its tail looks just like its head. Photo Credit: Bruce Young.The Calabar’s armor creates some limitations. Calabar pythons have one of the smallest clutch sizes of any snake, for instance. Females lay only four eggs on average, whereas more elastic snakes can lay up to 100. The eggs themselves are long and slender, rather than the chicken-like eggs produced by many other snakes.And while most snakes can famously eat things far bigger than their own heads, the Calabar’s thick skin limits its ability to swell. This partly explains their preference for eating infant rodents. Despite being a close relative to constrictors, which subdue their prey by coiling around it and squeezing, the Calabar’s technique might more accurately be described as “squashing.” Within the tight quarters of underground burrows, the snakes squish their tiny prey against the earthen walls. This tactic allows the Calabar to kill and eat entire litters at once.The individual scales of the Calabar burrowing python, which modern genetic analysis reveals is actually in the boa family despite “python” being in its common name, are only a bit thicker than those of most snakes. However, they’re packed more closely together.“With most snakes you can spread their scales apart and see the inner skin between the scales,” said Young. “You can’t spread the scales of the Calabar.” Pressing down on the scales also appears to make them lock together even more tightly — something Young is anxious to study.“No other snake approached the skin condition of the Calabar,” said Young. “This really is a novelty among snakes.”The blunt head of the Calabar burrowing python looks almost identical to its tail. Photo Credit: Bruce Young.CITATIONHan D, Young BA. The rhinoceros among Serpents: Comparative anatomy and experimental biophysics of Calabar burrowing python (Calabaria reinhardtii) skin. Journal of Morphology. 2018; 279:86–96. doi:10.1002/jmor.20756 Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Environment, Herps, Reptiles, Snakes, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In eastern Indonesia, a forest tribe pushes back against miners and loggers

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Deforestation, Environment, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Indonesia, Mining, Palm Oil, Plantations, Poaching, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Transmigration, Tropical Forests Banner image: Screenshot of community members featured in the video by Indonesia Nature Film Society/Youtube. The Forest Tobelo, an indigenous tribe in Indonesia’s North Maluku province, faces constant threat from illegal loggers and the expansion of mining leases.More than one third of the province’s total area has been allocated for mining leases.The community has chosen to fight back by drawing up its own maps of the land to which it has long laid claim, and by reporting illegal incursions into its forests. HALMAHERA, Indonesia — Deep in the lush rainforests of Halmahera Island, in the far-flung eastern reaches of Indonesia, lives an indigenous tribe whose way of life is so intricately tied to the environment that it calls itself simply O’Hangana Manyawa — the people who live in the forest.Known to outsiders as the Forest Tobelo people, the tribe believes the forests are home to its ancestors, and must therefore never be destroyed. This is reflected in their semi-nomadic lifestyle, in which they follow the seasons and the animals, hunting and gathering in one area before moving on.They live in an area that measures just 265 square kilometers (102 square miles), according to the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN), the main advocacy group for Indonesia’s indigenous tribes, but that area is fast dwindling. In the 1980s, parts of their forest were earmarked for the government’s transmigration program, under which people from densely populated islands, particularly Java, were moved to less populous areas of the country, including North Maluku province, of which Halmahera is a part.“Our community forests are being cut down for the transmigration program,” says Madiki, the leader of the Forest Tobelo. “When the government wanted to launch the transmigration program here, they never consulted with us.”The Forest Tobelo were displaced from their areas, and with no legal recognition of their claims to the land, those who remained have had to face various threats, including illegal logging in their ancestral forest areas.In one particular area, outsiders enter the forest and cut down the trees there, selling them for at least 1 million rupiah per cubic meter, or about $2 per cubic foot.“If we estimate that there are 10 cubic meters, in three to four days around 10 million to 15 million rupiah [$727 to $1,090] is taken from the indigenous land,” Albert Ngingi, an activist from AMAN, said in 2015. “This has been going on for nearly one year. The timber trees that the community plants in their fields are logged.”A bigger threat comes from industrial expansion. At least two mining companies, PT Roda Nusantara and PT Indo Bumi Nikel, operate in the Forest Tobelo’s ancestral land, according to Munadi Kilkoda from the North Maluku chapter of AMAN. PT Roda Nusantara occupies 695 hectares (1,717 acres) of the Forest Tobelo’s area, while PT Indo Bumi Nikel’s concession overlaps with 11 hectares (27 acres) of the ancestral forest.“Maybe right now the destruction of forests and environmental degradation can’t be seen yet,” Munadi says. “But in the future, it’s a guarantee that the rivers that are still clean now and used by the Forest Tobelo people will be contaminated by mining activity.”The threat of industrial expansion extends beyond the Forest Tobelo’s territory. More than a third of North Maluku’s total area of nearly 32,000 square kilometers (12,350 square miles) has been allocated for mining leases. In Halmahera alone, there are 335 mining leases, as well as four oil palm leases and hundreds of timber concessions.“The threat is real,” Munadi says. “Many areas are degraded from the extractive activities of mining companies through government-issued licenses.”And deforestation is picking up in North Maluku. A recent report by environmental watchdog Forest Watch Indonesia (FWI) shows that the province lost 520 square kilometers (200 square miles) of forests per year between 2013 and 2016, double the annual rate from 2009 to 2013.Previously neglected regions of eastern Indonesia, such as North Maluku with its relatively large tracts of intact rainforest, are increasingly prone to deforestation as developers look beyond the fast-depleting landscapes of Sumatra and Indonesian Borneo, according to FWI campaigner Agung Ady Setyawan.“This is a warning for us because intact rainforests in east Indonesia are under threat, seeing how there’s a significant increase in the deforestation rate and investment permits that are being issued in areas with large rainforests,” he said in a press statement.A member of the Forest Tobelo indigenous group in North Maluku, Indonesia. Photo by Muhammad Ector Prasetyo/Flickr.In a bid to stake its claim to the forest, the community is fighting back through participatory mapping, a process that acknowledges most indigenous groups’ lack of formal title to the land.When developers submit proposals for a piece of land, they come prepared with maps, something that local communities typically don’t have even if their presence there pre-dates the establishment of the Indonesian republic. To address this, groups like the Forest Tobelo are meticulously researching their history, carrying out surveys and sketching out, in a participatory process, what they believe to be the boundaries of their land. These maps are then submitted for collective approval by the community.AMAN has also developed a monitoring system through which the Forest Tobelo can send text messages to report any illegal activities that threaten them.“We hope that this reporting system will allow the community to directly pass on information about those involved in and supporting these activities, and the type of illegal activities occurring,” Albert said.Armed with the participatory maps and the monitoring system, the Forest Tobelo hope they can defend their right to live in the forests they have called their own for generations.“I will protect the trees and land, because these are our parents’ heritage,” says a member of the Forest Tobelo. “If the land and forest are gone, what else will I have? My children and grandchildren will suffer. I must protect them.”center_img Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong This article is a narrative recap from a video made by the “If Not Us then Who?” project.last_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, April 6, 2018

first_imgConservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments. Tropical forestsA construction magnate in Thailand has been charged with poaching (Reuters).Restoring forests requires the right tools, and we don’t have them all yet (CIFOR Forests News).Might all the world’s wilderness disappear in the coming decades? (Outside Magazine).Rising vanilla prices have led to deforestation and violence in Madagascar (The Guardian).Changes to the shapes of tropical forests could lead to their collapse, new study finds (University of Vermont/Phys.Org).Research tracks a strengthening case for agroforestry in addressing hunger and saving forests (CIFOR Forests News).The island of Puerto Rico, still recovering from Hurricane Maria, begins to reopen its rainforests to visitors (AP/The Washington Post).Other newsA science journalist discusses climate change with her daughter (The Atlantic).Genetic evidence reveals that progenitors to modern baleen whale species interbred (The New York Times).Conservation biologists take a page out of astronomers’ playbook with an algorithm for counting endangered species (The New York Times).New research predicts that, with the right design, carbon taxes could help fight climate change and be fair (Massachusetts Institute of Technology/EurekAlert).Not just bees: Study teases apart the relationships that flowers have with vertebrate pollinators (Ecological Society of America/EurekAlert).Climate change could lead to birds starting their migrations before they’ve stored enough energy (Cornell University/EurekAlert).A new technique that allows scientists to freeze sperm could help save African wild dogs (James Cook University/EurekAlert).Kenya launches effort to tag 22 rhinos in bid to help stop the decline in numbers (Reuters).Fishing for shrimp leads to outsized carbon dioxide emissions (Science Magazine).Scientists discover a four-eyed lizard that lived millions of years ago (Science Magazine, The Hindu).EPA lowers fuel-mileage requirements for cars in the U.S. (The Revelator, Pacific Standard).Monarch butterflies could lose their favorite food, milkweed, as climate change makes it poisonous (Louisiana State University/Phys.Org).Losing ground: Antarctica’s glaciers are melting away from underneath (BBC News).Greenpeace warns that the fishery for krill around Antarctica might endanger whales and penguins (Oceans Deeply).Reef fish diversity suffers when coral bleaches (ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies/EurekAlert).EPA chief removed or reassigned several dissenting staffers (The New York Times).Fourteen states file lawsuit against EPA for lowering methane emissions standards for oil and gas exploration efforts, which they say violates the Clean Air Act (Reuters).A butterfly species makes its first appearance 60 years after it was first collected in Mexico (University of Florida/EurekAlert).Banner image of gentoo penguins with chicks at Jougla Point, Antarctica, by Liam Quinn from Canada via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0). FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

Indonesian billionaire using ‘shadow companies’ to clear forest for palm oil, report alleges

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by mongabayauthor Anonymous Companies, Banks, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Finance, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Palm Oil, Peatlands, Plantations, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Transparency, Tropical Forests center_img Two plantation companies linked to Anthoni Salim, Indonesia’s third-richest man, are deforesting a peat swamp in Borneo, according to new research by Aidenvironment.In response to the findings, Citigroup said it was cancelling all lending agreements with IndoAgri, the Salim Group’s agribusiness arm.The Salim Group was previously accused of being behind four companies at the forefront of illegal oil palm expansion in Indonesia’s Papua region, employing a complex network of shared directorships and offshore companies to obfuscate its responsibility.“It is not just the Salim Group; most of the main palm oil groups have these ‘dark sides’ that continue to deforest,” said Selwyn Moran, founder of investigative blog awas MIFEE. The owner of Indonesia’s largest conglomerate has been accused of participating in the illegal deforestation of Borneo’s Ketungau peat swamp to make way for oil palm plantations.The Salim Group, owned by tycoon Anthoni Salim, Indonesia’s fourth-richest man according to Forbes, is reportedly linked either by ownership or association with the two companies that cleared nearly 10,000 hectares of the protected rainforest.The Salim Group notably includes Indofood, a joint-venture partner with major brands such as PepsiCo and Nestle, as well as First Pacific, the joint owner of Goodman Fielder, a leading food producer in the Asia-Pacific region.In a new report released today, Aidenvironment, a sustainability consultancy, said that the Salim Group’s continuing reliance on “shadow companies” to sidestep legal oversight also raised questions over the complicity of major banks, such as Citibank, Mizuho, Standard Chartered, BNP Paribas and Rabobank, that finance the Salim Group.“This report provides clear evidence of shady business dealings and inaction at the highest levels of business, all while tropical rainforests continue to fall for Conflict Palm Oil,” said Gemma Tillack, forest policy director of Rainforest Action Network (RAN), which commissioned the research along with Rainforest Foundation Norway (RFN) and SumOfUs.The report, titled “Palm oil sustainability assessment of Salim-related companies in Borneo peat forests”, also alleged that The Salim Group was made aware of the deforestation carried out by PT Duta Rendra Mulya — majority owned by Anthoni Salim — and PT Sawit Khatulistiwa Lestari — linked with the tycoon through business associates — in early 2016, but failed to act despite repeated attempts at government intervention.It found that one of the companies, PT Sawit Khatulistiwa Lestari, had successfully applied for a change to the government’s peatland moratorium map to allow development, despite almost all of the concession being categorized as “peatlands prioritized for protection.”“The Salim Group’s financiers and business partners––like PepsiCo––are complicit in the illegal deforestation, as they continue to do business with Salim without issue. PepsiCo, Nestle and Wilmar must bring their business partner into compliance with Indonesian law and sustainability norms of deforestation-free development or exit their business relationships,” Tillack said in a statement.A piece of oil palm fruit. Palm oil is used in a wide variety of processed foods, cosmetics, detergents and biofuels. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The corporate structure of Salim’s conglomerate — a foundation of publicly listed companies with declared sustainability commitments and Salim Group-related shadow companies that allegedly continue to operate illegally — should be of serious concern to investors and business partners, the report argues.“This isn’t the first time that companies in the Salim Group have been exposed for destructive practices,” Kiki Taufik, head of Greenpeace’s Indonesian forests campaign, said in the statement. “The Salim Group is one of the worst offenders and has gone out of its way to keep its destructive operations separate from the public face of the Indofood empire. That’s why companies need to take responsibility for ensuring that they only use palm oil from responsible producers that protect rainforests and respect human rights.”The Salim Group did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Mongabay.The Ketungau peat swamp in Indonesian Borneo’s Sintang district is subject to special protections under Indonesian law. Peat forests are at high risk of burning and are covered by specific rules as part of global climate regulations because they act as natural carbon storage areas. The annual CO2 emissions from the drained area of the Ketungau peatland will be equivalent to the annual emissions from 110,000 passenger vehicles, according to figures from the World Resources Institute.According to new supply chain data analyzed by Greenpeace, major brands continue to do business with palm oil mills which are at high risk of sourcing from Salim Group-linked companies.“Billions of dollars in corporate loans, and finance from bonds and shares, have all flowed to the Salim Group companies despite Mr Salim’s connection to ongoing illegal deforestation,” said Vemund Olsen from RFN. “Banks need to step up their commitments to climate change and stop bankrolling peat destruction.”The canopy of an oil palm plantation in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.In response to the findings in the Aidenvironment report, Citigroup said it was cancelling all lending agreements with IndoAgri, the Salim Group’s agribusiness arm, effective immediately and conducting an investigation into its exposure to tainted palm oil through other lines of credit offered to Indofood. Standard Chartered, HSBC, Rabobank and DBS said they remained committed to sustainable palm oil policies and would review lending arrangements where necessary. BNP Paribas and SMFG denied responsibility because PT Duta Rendra Mulya and PT Sawit Khatulistiwa Lestari are not their clients.In 2016, The Salim Group was accused of being behind four companies that were at the forefront of illegal oil palm expansion in Indonesia’s Papua region, employing a complex network of shared directorships and offshore companies to obfuscate its responsibility.Recent research by investigative blog awas MIFEE has also alleged that the Indogunta Group, a non-traditional corporate entity with numerous plantations in the Kalimantan and Papua regions, was controlled, through a series of beneficial ownership arrangements, by Salim.Selwyn Moran of awas MIFEE said it was a challenge for the environmental movement to campaign against the financing of companies such as the Salim Group, which operate obscure supply chains.“It is not just the Salim Group; most of the main palm oil groups have these ‘dark sides’ that continue to deforest,” he told Mongabay. “If trader and consumer companies genuinely want to commit to no-deforestation policies then they need to apply the principle of group-level responsibility to these groups where the ownership structure is obscure and there is a good reason to believe that there is a beneficial owner who is not on the shareholding list.”“It should really be up to the trading companies to place the burden of proof on their suppliers to disprove the link with companies that deforest, especially if they are registered at the same address, as in the case of some of the Salim concessions.”last_img read more