Egypt’s Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq resigns

first_img Share News Egypt’s Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq resigns by: – March 3, 2011 Sharing is caring! Egypt’s Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq has resigned, the country’s ruling military council has announced in a statement.A former transport minister, Essam Sharaf, has been asked to form a new government, the statement adds.Mr Shafiq was appointed days before President Hosni Mubarak was forced out of office following days of anti-government protests.Protesters saw Mr Shafiq as too closely associated to Mr Mubarak’s rule, observers say.“The Supreme Council of the Armed Forces decided to accept the resignation of Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq and appointed Essam Sharaf to form the new government,” the army said in a statement on its Facebook page.Mr Shafiq was appointed by Mr Mubarak just days before he stepped down on 11 February after several weeks of popular protests against his rule.It had been one of the protesters’ key demands that Mr Shafiq and other top ministers appointed at the end of the Mubarak rule step down. Mr Sharaf’s appointment is significant as he spoke out in support of the revolution and took part in the street protests, says the BBC’s Alastair Leithead in Cairo.It is a major step towards appeasing the demonstrators who have continued to camp out in Tarihr Square, as Mr Sharaf was a vocal opponent of the Mubarak government since his resignation as a minister five years ago, our correspondent adds.Travel banThe military council, which has been running the country since Mr Mubarak stepped down, has previously ordered the government to run the country’s affairs for six months “or until the end of parliamentary and presidential elections” and is also examining constitutional reforms.On Monday, Egypt issued a travel ban on ousted President Mubarak and his family.Mr Mubarak is believed to be living in his villa in Sharm el-Sheikh, but in poor health, and has not been seen or heard of publicly since stepping down. BBC News Tweet Share 11 Views   no discussions Sharelast_img read more

Meeke makes excellent start

first_img Press Association Meeke, who missed out on an opportunity to win himself in Germany, was happy with the short run that serves as a prelude to the main competitive action that begins on Friday. “It felt comfortable and good,” said Meeke. “This shakedown is a good representation of the rally. I adjusted a few settings between runs and I think we’re in the ball park with the set-up. We’ll see.” Assessing the conditions, which appear to be very different to a year ago, Meeke added: “Last year it was very, very dry and dusty. “But there’s been a bit of rain in the last two weeks and the road is still a bit humid in some sections under the trees. “That can make some corners very slippery, so you have to be on your guard.” VW team-mates Jari-Matti Latvala and reigning champion Sebastien Ogier were fourth and fifth behind Meeke, 1.4secs and 1.5secs off the pace respectively. After neither man finished the rally in Germany, Ogier continues to hold a 44-point lead over Latvala in the standings with four events remaining. The Northern Irishman posted a time of two minutes 52.9 seconds around the Hydes Creek special stage on the outskirts of Coffs Harbour, situated halfway between Sydney and Brisbane on the New South Wales coast. Meeke finished 0.4secs ahead of fellow Citroen DS3 driver Mads Ostberg, with recent Rally Germany winner Thierry Neuville third in his Hyundai, a further 0.4secs adrift. center_img Kris Meeke led a Citroen one-two at the end of the Rally Australia shakedown on Thursday. last_img read more

Premier League’s ‘Project Restart’ gathers pace

first_imgThe Premier League’s medical adviser, Mark Gillett, and the Football Association’s head of medicine, Charlotte Cowie, are understood to be part of a group of officials who will meet on a weekly basis with government and public health representatives.Regular virus testing of all players and key staff would be a crucial part of the restart plan and the cost of those tests would be met centrally by the Premier League, according to reports.All clubs will be working to the same protocols in terms of training sessions, which will be designed to minimise the risk of infection.Matches would almost certainly be played behind closed doors and clubs have reportedly been told that only approved stadiums could be used, with higher health certification than normal.The Professional Footballers’ Association are involved in discussions and have raised the issue of players not wanting to be put at risk by returning too soon.“We have reiterated that players are not just footballers but partners, fathers, mothers, sons and daughters who share the same health concerns as everyone else during this pandemic,” said PFA deputy chief executive Bobby Barnes.“We have been assured of the intentions of all that there would be no resumption unless guarantees of safety could be given to the players.”The return of football remains controversial, with Britain still battling the pandemic.Watford chief executive Scott Duxbury said: “Football, for me now, just needs to be put to one side. I feel uncomfortable at this stage even talking about football as a narrative, because there are people dying every day.“There are stresses on the NHS and that has to be our priority.“When it is safe and the government say it is absolutely fine for players and support staff to return, then I am 100 percent behind that.”Share on: WhatsApp London, United Kingdom | AFP | Tottenham became the latest Premier League club to open their doors to players on Tuesday as part of the “Project Restart” plan to finish the English top-flight season.The Premier League has been suspended since March 13 due to the coronavirus crisis but there is growing belief the campaign can be concluded over the summer months.Resuming matches on June 8 is reportedly among the ideas set to be discussed when the Premier League’s key stakeholders meet on Friday.That would require full training to begin by May 18 and Premier League clubs are starting to work towards that date by giving players the option of using their training grounds.Tottenham have followed Arsenal, West Ham and Brighton in allowing players to use facilities for individual sessions that conform to social-distancing guidelines.“No more than one player per pitch will be permitted at any one time to undertake on-pitch exercise, with only a restricted number of the squad coming to the training centre each day,” a Tottenham statement said.“Each player will travel independently and arrive at the facilities already dressed in training wear before returning home immediately after they have concluded their session.”After weeks of lockdown in Britain, ministers believe the return of football would boost morale.Culture secretary Oliver Dowden who is responsible for sport, said he had been in talks with the Premier League “with a view to getting football up and running as soon as possible” but stressed any moves would have to be consistent with public health guidance.The clubs remain committed to ending the 2019/20 campaign and there are compelling financial and legal reasons to play the remaining 92 games.– ‘Health concerns’ –last_img read more

City League preview—teams to watch in 2010

first_img“We expect to win every game this season,” Allderdice coach Jerry Haslett said. “Whether those expectations are real or not, that’s what we expect to accomplish. Nothing less.”Haslett and his Dragons posted a 1-9 record in 2009, but feel they have weapons at the skill positions that will help them make a turnaround this season.“I believe our best overall player is Dominick Gardner, a 6-3 and 175-pound wide receiver and free safety,” said Haslett.They also feature a 6-4, 215-pound senior quarterback in Mike Pfleger who was among the top passers in the league last season.“We expect Mike to be very good this year,” said Haslett. “He’s a big kid and he’s got the necessary experience that’s needed to go out there and help us win games.”Brashear won the title in 2008 and had high hopes in 2009 with some very talented players. They fell short of the mark by dropping the league semifinal to defending champs Schenley Nov. 6 of last year.But that’s not keeping the Bulls from having a lot faith in their players this year.“With the departure of three very good seniors last year, we understand that it will be difficult to get back to where we were in ’08,” said Brashear coach Rick Murphy. “We know we have big shoes to fill. But that’s not going to stop us from believing in what we have and winning games.”One of the players that Murphy hopes to step in and pick up the team, is first-year junior quarterback Adam Lynch.“He’s a great athlete,” said Murphy. “He’s easily got 4.4-4.5 speed, a good arm, intelligence, and he’s showing a good understanding of what we expect out of him this year.”They also will look to the speedy Manny Reed, who hopes to expound on the things he accomplished last year as the city’s best kick returner.He’s going to be good,” Murphy said. “We’d like him to increase his involvement in the offense and as our corner this year as well. He’ll be a busy guy this year and we know he’s got incredible talent.”Schenley won it all last year. It was their first title in 50 years and they want to be able to add to their trophy case one last time as a program. They’ll no longer be the Spartans after the school board decided to close the school in 2008. However, it will be difficult for them as they return only six starters, one of the lowest amounts in the league.“It’s different, most definitely,” Schenley coach Jason Bell said. “I look on the field and don’t see number 22, 75 or 55. I worked with those kids for years and to see them not there anymore really makes things different.”They will return the multi-sport star DeAndre Black who will start on both sides of the ball at wide receiver and corner back.“DeAndre is by far our best player,” said Bell. “He’s an outstanding athlete and we’ll see what types of things that he’ll be able to do out there.”The Spartans will play much smaller this season, as will what is projected for most of the league this year.“There is a lack of size in linemen throughout the city,” Bell added. “However, there are some good ones. We’re no exception to that. We’ll no longer have the size that we’ve had in the past. We will be the Oliver of last year. We’ll be very athletic but still able to make key blocks in crucial situations. (The lack of size) will probably be our only issue this season.” DEANDRE BLACK and MANNY REED by Malik VincentThe Pittsburgh City League is ready to pick up competition in the 2010 season with some much needed improvement to its home, Cupples Stadium on the South Side. With that should come some much-warranted improvements with certain teams around the league.last_img read more

Deane Porter Art Show Features Students’ Finest Creations

first_imgRUMSON –An appreciative crowd enjoyed original work by talented students in Kindergarten through third grade at the annual Deane Porter School Art Show on May 19.“The annual Art Show is a fantastic event that showcases the creative, imaginative, and beautiful work of the Deane Porter students,” said art teacher Robin Yaeger. “My students work hard in the art room week to week, and having the opportunity to show the community their masterpieces is a very rewarding experience for them and for me.”Along with sculptures, themed self-portraits, African and Egyptian masks, pottery and weavings, digital art was featured once again, as Deane Porter has received additional IPads for use by art students in all grades.“The Art Show is an inspirational annual exhibit that highlights the creative talents of the Deane Porter students,” said Principal Shari Feeney. “It is always a wonderful event that shares the students’ artwork with the school community.”“I am sure they were as impressed as I am with the quality of the art.”last_img read more

IN FINAL DRILL FOR $12 PEGASUS WORLD CUP INVITATIONAL, BAFFERT’S ARROGATE GOES SIX FURLONGS IN 1:12.13; BREEDERS’ CUP CLASSIC CHAMP HANDLES ‘WET-FAST’ SURFACE WITH APLOMB, WILL FLY TO FLORIDA TUESDAY

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 21, 2017)–In his final work in preparation for next Saturday’s $12 million Pegasus World Cup Invitational at Gulfstream Park and an epic rematch with legendary California Chrome, Bob Baffert’s Santa Anita-based Arrogate went an easy six furlongs in 1:12.13 prior to today’s first race at about 11:45 a.m. Santa Anita Timer Dane Nelson had Arrogate through splits of 24.82 (while well off the rail), 48.87 and 1:01.02. Nelson had the grey or roan colt by Unbridled’s Song galloping out seven furlongs in 1:24.37 and a mile in 1:38.32–on a main track that was listed by Track Superintendent Dennis Moore as “wet-fast.”As he has done the past two weekends, Arrogate, idle since defeating California Chrome by a half length in the $6 million Breeders’ Cup Classic here on Nov. 5, entered Santa Anita’s main track via the quarter mile chute and galloped straight off through the stretch under jockey Martin Garcia.With Baffert, wife Jill and longtime friend George Jacobs, who is the owner of workmate Uninvited, watching the drill from a private suite atop the track’s box seat area, Arrogate was set down for business coming to the three quarter pole, about 10 links behind Uninvited. He then closed the gap to about four lengths at the quarter pole, prevailing by a measured neck at the wire as Garcia stayed down into the Club House turn.“What a relief that was,” said Baffert. “I’ve been on pins and needles watching this severe weather pattern. If I’d known we were going to get this much rain, I might’ve gone to Florida for his last work. I love the way he’s training…Last time (Jan. 15), he went a little too quick (early). Today, Martin went off slow with him and he just kept him underneath him.“He’s fit but we have to wait another week and we’ll need some racing luck. Dennis Moore’s done a great job with this track and I couldn’t be happier. He’ll leave early Tuesday.”According to Baffert, Arrogate is scheduled to be flown early Tuesday morning to south Florida, where he’ll then be vanned to Gulfstream.Owned by Juddmonte Farms, Arrogate, who was also a record setting winner of the prestigious Grade I Travers Stakes at Saratoga two starts back on Aug. 27, has five wins from six starts and has earnings of $4,084,600. He’ll be ridden for the third consecutive time next Saturday by Mike Smith.For more information on next Saturday’s $12 million Pegasus World Cup Invitational and to make Pegasus seating and dining reservations at Santa Anita, please visit santaanita.com or call (626) 574-RACE. STAGE SET FOR EPIC REMATCH WITH LEGENDARY CALIFORNIA CHROME AT GULFSTREAM PARKlast_img read more

Belo Monte legacy: harm from Amazon dam didn’t end with construction (photo story)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A map showing the Belo Monte mega-dam and reservoir where it bisects a big bend in the Xingu River hangs on the wall of a home in Ilha da Fazenda, a small fishing village a few kilometers from the dam. According to village leader Otavio Cardoso Juruna, an indigenous Juruna, around 40 families live in Ilha da Fazenda, which was founded in 1940. Ilha da Fazenda is a mixed village of indigenous and non-indigenous residents. Residents complain that although they were negatively affected by the dam like others in the region, they were not compensated because they were not designated as an “indigenous village.” There is no potable water, sanitation or healthcare in Ilha da Fazenda, and locals were forced to stop fishing after the dam reduced the river’s flow by 80 percent and massively depleted fish stocks. Otavia said villagers were forming an organization to negotiate for compensation due to the planned Belo Sun goldmine, the region’s next mega-development project. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationThe consensus among environmental experts in Altamira is that Belo Monte with its deforestation and altered river flow also may have accelerated the regional effects of climate change, which were already being felt before it was built. Fish kills occurred and fish stocks plummeted, and turtles that fed on fish were no longer mating, disrupting the livelihoods of traditional communities up and down the Xingu.The irony of Belo Monte is that the compensation doled out to indigenous communities during the dam’s construction – up to $10,000 dollars per month per indigenous group for two years – did much of the damage: the sudden surge in ready cash prompted a rush by rural communities to embrace modern consumer goods and services. As people were uprooted, there was an unprecedented rise in alcoholism, prostitution and inter-tribal feuds; conditions became so bad that it prompted a Brazilian public prosecutor to sue Norte Energia for causing “ethnicide,” – the obliteration of indigenous culture.Then came the Volta Grande mine (also known as the Belo Sun mine) – a separate project to install a massive goldmine downriver from Belo Monte, only 10 kilometers away from the Juruna indigenous group, which had already suffered from the dam’s construction.If built, it would be the largest industrial goldmine in Brazil, dwarfing the Serra Pelada goldmine, made famous by Sebastiao Salgado’s photos in the 1980s, which, like a scene out of Dante’s Inferno, showed laborers struggling in the mud like insects deep inside the multi-leveled hell of a gigantic open pit goldmine.Juruna indigenous group leader Gilliarde Jacinto Juruna, leads an occupation of the Norte Energia offices in the resettlement district of Jatoba, Altamira. Occupations and protests are a constant in the region, as displaced indigenous communities fight for compensation and to ensure that the agreed-to social programs are implemented by the company. Norte Energia has been accused of using only 28 percent of the resources set aside to compensate those affected by the dam, according to the Socio-Environmental Institute (ISA). The company’s operating license has been revoked several times for failing to implement these social projects. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationThere were many local residents in favor of the Volta Grande goldmine, because it brought the promise of work. But environmentalists, small-scale miners and indigenous communities living close by abhorred the project, which they feared spelt disaster for their homes and livelihoods. If the goldmine’s waste dams ever burst, as happened at Brazil’s Samarco mine in 2015, there would be no escape for those living nearby. They would be forced to run for their lives or drown in a biblical wave of toxic mud.Not all the news has been bad along the Xingu River and in the Amazon, as colossal changes have swept Brazil in recent months. The Volta Grande project was stalled by a federal court in December 2017 for not properly consulting indigenous communities. And in an unforeseen U-turn, the Brazilian government scrapped a list of mega-dam projects it had planned, projects that would have displaced thousands of indigenous people, especially those of the Munduruku group.During our time in Altamira, Aaron and I went to investigate the fallout of Belo Monte at the human level, looking in at the minutiae of daily life and speaking to people face-to-face. What we observed is that when people see their cultural connections, communities and environment shattered, no amount of compensation, no matter how big, seems able to replace the void left behind.People resist and adapt to such wrenching changes in all manner of ways, like the Juruna, who have continued to resist the Belo Sun goldmine with political skill and die-hard determination.But for other communities, families or individuals the loss of a cultural connection with their physical surroundings – of home, forest and river – proves too much to endure. It is no surprise that indigenous people in Brazil have among the highest suicide rates in South America, three times the national average of other Brazilians, according to the nation’s Ministry of Health. They are also the people currently most threatened with land loss, and with violence from land conflicts as well.Residents of Altamira who once lived along the river overlook the resettlement district of Jatoba during its construction in 2014. Today there are five such settlements housing those displaced by the Belo Monte dam. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationWhile the current Brazilian government under Michel Temer has for now shelved plans to build big dams, that policy could shift with the October national elections. Meanwhile, wildcat logging and illegal mining, along with land theft, continues unabated and represents a major threat to forests throughout Brazil.Deforestation spiked in 2016, according to Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research, representing a 75 percent increase after a historic low in 2012, and with the bancada ruralista agribusiness lobby controlling Congress, most experts expect deforestation to rise this year, and likely in years ahead, increasing greenhouse gas releases and threatening Brazil’s Paris Climate Agreement pledge.Today, the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam stands as a warning – proof of the damage caused by ill-conceived Amazon mega-projects. Due to escalating climate change and drought that is reducing Xingu River flows, the dam seems almost certain to never fulfill promised economic or energy producing goals. And today, those whose lives were shattered by the corporate damning of the “river of gods” struggle to find a way forward.Fisherman Raimundu Morais Araujo stands in the empty foundation of his home on the banks of the Xingu River. Norte Energia, the consortium that built the Belo Monte dam, destroyed his home and filled his well with rocks to prevent his return. But his land only floods when there is more rainfall than usual. By February 2017, some displaced fishing families that used to live along the river, returned to occupy the edges of the 200-square mile reservoir in a bold move to reclaim their way of life. Hundreds of fishing families have now resettled, and are lobbying the government for financial support and legal recognition. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationMany riverside residents displaced by Belo Monte were relocated to new communities such as Agua Azul, seen here in 2016. The new neighborhoods are far from the Xingu River where the people used to live and fish, and offer little in the way of employment. The distance from the river and town center makes transport another issue, and some residents feel stranded. Many of the displaced families are ribeirinhos, meaning “river people.” Ribeirinhos are traditional people who have a shared history going back more than 100 years in the Brazilian Amazon, when settlers came to find work during rubber booms in the 19th, and later, the 20th Century. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationFlooded Islands and dead trees in the Belo Monte dam’s reservoir. Ribeirinhos (“river-people”) used to populate these many islands, which have now been flooded. Norte Energia was legally required to fell trees before the region was flooded to reduce methane emissions, adding to global warming, but many were simply left to rot in violation of the agreement with the government. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationA young woman is carried by her friends out of a nightclub in Altamira in 2016. She was placed on the back of a motorcycle, unconscious, and presumably taken to a hospital. Altamira has been through a number of economic booms, including the rubber boom in the 19th and 20th centuries, and the TransAmazon Highway construction boom, which opened up the Amazon’s interior to settlement. The most recent boom came with the building of the Belo Monte Dam, a six-billion dollar project which made the population swell. However, a month after construction ended in 2015, 20,000 workers were laid off, and the economy crashed by 52 percent. Violence and alcoholism also spiked. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationMaria, an indigenous Xikrin Kayapo woman, stands in the gate of the Casa do Indios, which offers state-funded accommodations for indigenous people visiting the city of Altamira. The Xikrin live along the Bacaja River (a major tributary to the Xingu), which has also been negatively affected by the Belo Monte dam. Illegal gold mining has become a severe problem on the Upper Bacaja, which now has lower water levels since the dam was completed. Indigenous communities and health experts fear mercury poisoning from the highly toxic mining activities upriver. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationJose Pereira Cunha, known as “Pirolito” (Lollipop head), is the vice-president of a small gold miners cooperative in the town of Ressaca. While it is not an affluent lifestyle, Pirolito explains that mining is more than that for him and other small-scale miners, “it’s about having autonomy,” he says. Ressaca is a historic mining town founded in the 1940s, with around 300 families living there. Small-scale, or artisanal, gold-mining employs around 200,000 people in Brazil. Although there are laws regulating the highly toxic activity, which uses mercury to extract gold, in practice the laws are very hard to enforce because of lack of government funding and the logistics of imposing law deep in the Amazon. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationA boat-hoist that uses tractors to pull boats around to the other side of the Pimental Dam, which forms part of the Belo Monte dam complex. Locals and Indigenous communities must still navigate the Xingu River, and to do so must repeatedly get around the dam. The boat hoist is a permanent service offered by Norte Energia, the consortium that built and operates the dam. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationMarch 18, 2014: executives from Norte Energia stand behind National Force soldiers before negotiating with a group of fisherman who have occupied the entrance to a construction site in order to protest impacts to their waters and way of life. By February 2017, displaced fishing families that used to live along the river returned to occupy the edges of the 200-square mile reservoir in a bold move to reclaim their way of life. Over a hundred families have now resettled, and are lobbying the government for financial support and legal recognition. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationIndigenous Juruna from the Paquiçamba Reserve at a 2016 public audience where ribeirinho (river-dwelling) communities voice their grievances to Norte Energia, the dam’s builder, and Brazil’s Public Ministry (independent federal prosecutors). Belo Monte displaced about 20,000 people, according to estimates by global NGOs such as International Rivers. The Brazilian advocacy group Xingu Vivo has put the number much higher, at over 50,000. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationCaboco Juruna from the indigenous Juruna Paquiçamba Reserve fishes for Acarí fish on the “Big Bend” of the Xingu River in 2016. Juruna means “kings of the river,” though the community now considers the Xingu all but dead. Caboco traps fish using a net or an improvised harpoon fashioned from an iron bar. This part of the river has had it’s water flow reduced by 80 percent after damming, which has threatened fishing livelihoods. The Juruna traditionally lived off several varieties of Acari fish – eating some and selling others as ornamental fish in nearby Altamira. The ornamental Acari Zebra is unique in that it is only found on the Big Bend of the Xingu, which has its own unique ecosystem. The community is now worried that the construction of the Belo Sun goldmine upstream, which would be the largest open pit gold mine in Brazil, will further damage the river and their way of life. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationThe tomb of Jariel Juruna in the village of Mïratu, Paquiçamba Reserve. Jarliel Juruna drowned in late November 2016 while attempting to dive for a prized species of Acari, which requires swimming down to depths of up to 65 feet using compressors. On this attempt, Jarliel’s compressor malfunctioned; he died at age 20, and the Juruna community was deeply in mourning when we arrived in Miratu. The Juruna blame the Belo Monte dam for cutting off the flow of the river and pushing all the fish into deeper waters. Jarliel’s mother also blamed Norte Energia for providing faulty tubes connected to the compressor. The Juruna said that before the Xingu was dammed, fish were plentiful in the river’s shallows. The community continues fighting for their indigenous rights. The Juruna have embarked on an independent project that monitors fish stocks along the Xingu River, with the help of the Brazil-based Socio-Environmental Institute (ISA), and they are holding Norte Energia to account for what they view as a disastrous compensation scheme. (In 2015, the state public prosecutor’s office filed a civil lawsuit against Norte Energia accusing it of causing “ethnocide” because of the way it implemented its compensation scheme during the dam’s construction.) Norte Energia has categorically denied these accusations. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia Foundation Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Climate Change and Dams, Controversial, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Responsibility, Corruption, Culture, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, electricity, Energy, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Featured, Flooding, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Photography, Photos, Protests, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation The controversial Belo Monte dam, operational in 2016 and the world’s third biggest, was forced on the people of Altamira, Pará state, and is now believed to have been built largely as payback to Brazil’s construction industry by the nation’s then ruling Workers’ Party for campaign contributions received.The dam was opposed by an alliance of indigenous and traditional communities, and international environmentalists, all to no avail. Today, the media coverage that once turned the world’s eyes toward Belo Monte, has gone away. But that hasn’t ended the suffering and harm resulting from the project.Tens of thousands of indigenous and traditional people were forced from their homes, and had to give up their fishing livelihoods. Meanwhile, the city of Altamira endured boom and bust, as workers flooded in, then abandoned it. The Belo Sun goldmine, if ever built, also continues to be a potential threat.In this story, Mongabay contributor Maximo Anderson and photographer Aaron Vincent Elkaim document the ongoing harm being done by the giant dam. Belo Monte, today, stands as a warning regarding the urgent need to properly assess and plan for mega-infrastructure projects in Amazonia. A girl stands alone in a flooded home in the Palifitas neighborhood of Invasão dos Padres, Altamira. The neighborhood has now been completely destroyed by the Belo Monte dam. The area where the community once stood is being turned into a public park by the Norte Energia consortium which built and operates Belo Monte. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationThe future of Brazil’s mega-dam construction program is unclear, with one part of the Temer government declaring it an end, while another says the program should go on. More clear is the ongoing harm being done by the giant hydroelectric projects already completed to the environment, indigenous and traditional communities.A case in point: the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam and reservoir, located on the Amazon’s Xingu River, and the third largest such project in the world.Photographer Aaron Vincent Elkaim and I spent three months in the Brazilian Amazon, between November 2016 and January 2017, documenting Belo Monte after it became operational.We were based in Altamira, a once small Amazonian city that saw explosive growth when the Brazilian government decided to build the controversial six-billion-dollar mega-dam.The dam was built in a record three years, despite widespread outrage and protests from locals, along with the environmental, indigenous and international community. Major public figures including rock star Sting, filmmaker James Cameron, and politician and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger waged a high-profile media campaign against the project, but even these lobbying efforts weren’t enough to change the direction of the Dilma Rousseff administration, which was ruling Brazil at the time.Ana De Francisco, an Altamira-based anthropologist and her son Thomas, visit the Belo Monte Dam in 2016. De Fransisco works for the regional office of the Socio-Environmental Institute (ISA), an influential Brazilian NGO focusing on environmental and human rights issues. She has been doing research for her PhD on the displacement of ribeirinho (traditional riverine) communities in the Xingu region. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationUltimately at least 20,000 people were displaced by the dam, according to NGO and environmental watchdog, International Rivers, though the local nonprofit, Xingu Vivo, puts the number at 50,000. Eventually, the project succeeded in staunching the once mighty Xingu, a major tributary to the Amazon and lifeblood to thousands of indigenous and forest-dwelling communities.Altamira, which lies just downstream from the dam, was transformed overnight becoming a raucous boomtown: the population shot up from 100,000 to 160,000 in just two years. Hotels, restaurants and housing sprang up. So did brothels. According to one widely circulated anecdote, there was so much demand for sex workers in Altamira at the time, that prostitutes asked local representatives of Norte Energia, the consortium building the dam, to stagger monthly pay checks to their employees, so as not to overwhelm escorts on payday.The boom didn’t last. The end of construction in 2015 signaled an exodus; 50,000 workers left, jobs vanished, violence surged in the city, as did a major health crisis that overwhelmed the local hospital when raw sewage backed up behind the dam.Boys climb a tree flooded by the Xingu River in 2014. Today, one-third of the city of Altamira has been permanently flooded by the Belo Monte Dam that displaced more than 20,000 people, destroying indigenous and ribeirinho (river-dwelling) traditional communities. The effects were so severe that Norte Energia, the company behind the dam, has been required to carry out a six-year study to measure the environmental and social impacts of Belo Monte and to determine if indigenous and fishing communities can continue to live downriver from the dam. Photo by Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Alexia FoundationWhen Aaron and I arrived in Altamira in 2016, the city still held some charm. Families strolled a popular boulevard skirting the Xingu River in the evening, and restaurants stayed open until late. But Aaron, having spent two years in the region before me, saw a different Altamira. He described the city I was seeing as “hollow,” and noted the disappearance of vibrant communities of ribeirinhos, “river people,” who had lived for generations by fishing at the riverside, and had been displaced by the dam. Many were relocated by the Norte Energia consortium to cookie-cutter suburban homes on the edge of town, far from the river and their fishing livelihood, and without access to public transportation.Ana de Francisco, an Altamira-based anthropologist and expert on ribeirinho communities, estimates that as many as 5,000 of these families were displaced.Belo Monte was no Three Gorges Dam – the Chinese project that displaced over a million people in 2009 – but it did wreak havoc; destroying communities and traditional ways of life, while also damaging the Xingu’s aquatic ecosystem, which has unique fish and turtle species. Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

Norsk Hydro accused of Amazon toxic spill, admits ‘clandestine pipeline’

first_imgNorsk Hydro’s Alunorte aluminum refining facility in Barcarena municipality, Pará state, has been accused by Brazilian authorities of contaminating the local waters of several communities with toxic waste that overflowed earlier this month from a holding basin.The firm denied the allegation, but has agreed to provide water to local residents, and is investigating.The government also accused the company of having a “clandestine pipeline to discharge untreated effluent,” an allegation that the Norwegian state firm has since admitted to being true.Officials have yet to determine the full cause, scope or consequence of the spill, while locals complain that this isn’t the first time. According to IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, Norsk Hydro has not paid fines set at R $17 million to date (US $5.27 million), after a toxic overflow in 2009 put the local Barcarena population at risk. Flooding at the Norske Hydro Alunorte facility following heavy rains in February. Photo by Instituo Evandro ChagasNorsk Hydro, a bauxite and aluminum mining and refining company also known as “Hydro” whose majority and controlling shareholder is the Norwegian government, has been accused by the Brazilian government of a toxic waste spill from holding basins at its Hydro Alunorte facility. The operation, located in Barcarena municipality, Pará state, near the mouth of the Amazon River, is the largest aluminum refining plant in the world. The company denies responsibility for any spill, but says it is cooperating fully with officials.Also last week, Norsk Hydro was accused of possessing a “clandestine pipeline to discharge untreated effluent” into a set of Muripi River Springs in a report by the Evandro Chagas Institute of Brazil’s Ministry of Health. The Norwegian mining giant at first denied this accusation, then admitted to it.“During one of the inspections, there was a pipeline with a small flow of reddish water in the refinery area,” the company says. “As requested by the authorities, the company is making the necessary investigations to identify the origin and nature of the material, as well as carrying out the immediate sealing of this pipeline.”The Norske Hydro Alunorte facility tailings basin that Brazilian officials say overflowed. Photo by Amazonia Real found on TwitterNorsk Hydro spill under investigationMajor storms on February 16 and 17 allegedly caused Norsk Hydro’s toxic holding basin to overflow, resulting in contamination of water used by Bom Futuro and several other nearby villages. Locals worry the accident could be similar to Brazil’s worst mining disaster ever, the Mariana spill on the Doces River in 2015.High levels of lead, aluminum, sodium and other toxins have been detected in drinking water up to two kilometers away from the Norsk Hydro property, according to the Ministry of Health. The pH recorded in the waters was 10, extremely alkaline, likely due to caustic soda used to process bauxite, the raw material for making aluminum.Pará State Attorney General Ricardo Negrini said in a Friday news conference there is “no doubt” a spill has occurred, but there is no data yet regarding the incident’s cause, size, or consequence.After initial complaints were made by community residents about the spill, Hydro sent a note to its customers describing the episode as “rumor,” stating that “there were no leaks or ruptures” in the waste holding basin.A satellite view of the Norske Hydro Alunorte facility as seen from space. Satellite image from Google Maps.The company also denied the spill on its website Sunday, saying that, “Internal and external inspections have not found proof of overflow and leakage from the bauxite residue deposits at Hydro Alunorte,” and that “The water has been collected, channeled and treated in the industrial effluent treatment station as normal.”However, the company told BBC Brazil “it is committed to correct any problem that may have been caused by its operation,” adding that “Hydro Alunorte informs that it is immediately providing potable water to the communities of Vila Nova and Bom Futuro, with the support of Civil Defense. The company undertakes to collaborate with the communities where the samples were collected by the Evandro Chagas Institute, to find permanent access solutions to drinking water, together with stakeholders.” The firm also said it would launch a task force to investigate.According to a health expert, “The [local] population uses these waters [near the storage basins] for recreation, consumption and capture of fish,” so that proximity could lead to contamination of soils and bio-accumulation. Results of tests for toxins done on hair and skin of those living near the spill won’t be available for several weeks.Asked about the clandestine pipeline described by the health ministry report and its denial of the spill, the company said it is waiting to receive an official report before commenting further.The Norwegian government stated that it would not be able to respond to questions submitted by Mongabay in a timely manner for this story.A view of the flooding around the Norske Hydro Alunorte operation in Barcarena municipality, Pará state, Brazil, during February 2018. Photo by Instituo Evandro ChagasBrazil responds to the spillLast Friday, the independent prosecutors of the Federal Public Ministry (MPF) and Pará state sent Norsk Hydro a document requesting immediate closure of the Norsk Hydro holding basin. According to the agencies, there is a risk of a breach of the waste pond, which has raised fears of a tragedy similar to that of Mariana in 2015, when a toxic mud wave buried the village of Bento Rodrigues and spread down the Doce River for 500 miles to the Atlantic Ocean.However, Luiz Jardim, a geographer and State University of Rio de Janeiro professor, told BBC Brazil that the dams at Mariana and Barcarena “have different natures,” with the Norsk Hydro holding basin presenting less of a threat. “In Mariana, the dam [was] much higher,” he said. But the slope is much less “in the Amazon, where there is a fluvial plain, so the force of the rupture, if it occurs, will be smaller. Barcarena [municipality does, however have the] potential for contamination by tailings.”In June of last year, BBC Brazil revealed that Hydro was the target of a series of denunciations by the Federal Public Ministry (MPF) of Pará, as well as almost 2,000 lawsuits for contamination of rivers and communities in Barcarena.According to IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency, the company has not paid fines set at R $17 million (US $5.27 million) to date, after a toxic overflow in 2009. According to IBAMA, the leak at that time put the local Barcarena population at risk and generated “significant destruction of biodiversity.”Memories of this previous trauma may have augmented concern expressed by local residents over the new spill. “This is not the first leak,” said Sandra Amorim, a resident of the São João quilombola (made up of former slave runaways), a kilometer from the Norsk Hydro holding basin. Back then, she said, “They first denied it, and after the report they said it had a leak. They promised that they [would] start distributing drinking mineral water and food. That’s not enough for us, we do not want crumbs, we want this situation solved.” She added that there are currently “people with itchy bodies and people getting sick” in the community. There is as yet no official confirmation of contamination of local residents by the Evandro Chagas Institute.The Brazilian Bar Association in Pará (OAB-PA) said that in response to the discovery of the illegal pipeline that they will request the removal of the Secretary of Environment of Pará, Thales Belo, and ask for judicial intervention in the Secretariat of Environment and Sustainability of Pará (SEMAS), the state’s environmental agency. “It caused special indignation [when the health ministry found] a ‘clandestine’ drain, whereby the company, with the acquiescence of SEMAS, drained tailings when the rains intensified,” said OAB-PA.An aerial view of the flooding at the Norske Hydro Alunorte compound. Photo by riotimesonline.com found on TwitterA region benefited and harmed by miningBarcarena, an estuarine region broken up by small rivers and islands, has seen its population grow at a rate three times faster than the rest of Brazil over the last 40 years, thanks to jobs generated by mining companies. But the province has experienced disorderly growth as it has become a major exporter of mineral commodities (bauxite, aluminum and kaolin), soy and cattle.“The history of environmental accidents in Barcarena is impressive, an average of one per year,” Attorney General Bruno Valente, who signed a public civil action filed in 2016, told the BBC last June. “Sludge overflow from Hydro’s tailings basin affected a number of communities in 2009, and to date there has never been a compensation or fine payment,” he said.Norwegian mining and processing companies are major producers of the world’s aluminum. The Norwegian government gained international headlines last year by publicly criticizing Brazil’s rising Amazon deforestation rate during a state visit by Brazilian President Michel Temer to Norway. In December, the Scandinavian country reduced by 60 percent to $42 million its annual contribution to Brazil after another annual rise in forest destruction.Some question whether the Norwegian government is acting fairly by causing environmental degradation in Brazil via its mining operations while simultaneously withholding funding due to its criticism of increased deforestation under the Temer government.Max Nathanson is a graduate student in the University of Oxford’s Department of International Development and a freelance photojournalist. See his work at maxnathanson.com and follow him on Twitter @TheMaxNathanson.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Mining, Amazon People, Chemicals, Controversial, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corruption, Dams, Disasters, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Law, Featured, Flooding, Green, Infrastructure, Law, Mining, Monitoring, Pollution, Rainforest Mining, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Water Pollution last_img read more

Audio: Exploring humanity’s deep connection to water, plus the sounds of the Sandhill crane migration

first_imgAcoustic, african palm oil, Animals, Big Cats, Bioacoustics, Bioacoustics and conservation, Birds, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Interviews, Jaguars, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Marine Protected Areas, Migration, Palm Oil, Podcast, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Rubber, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation On today’s episode, we discuss humanity’s deep connection to water and hear sounds of one of the most ancient animal migrations on Earth, that of the Sandhill crane.Our first guest today is marine biologist and conservationist Wallace J. Nichols, the author of Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, & Better at What You Do.Our second guests are Ben Gottesman and Emma Brinley Buckley, researchers who are using bioacoustics to document Sandhill cranes on the Platte River in the U.S. state of Nebraska as the birds make a stopover during their annual migration. We’ll hear recordings of the cranes and other important species in this Field Notes segment. On today’s episode, we discuss humanity’s deep connection to water and hear sounds of one of the most ancient animal migrations on Earth, that of the Sandhill crane.Listen here:Our first guest today is marine biologist and conservationist Wallace J. Nichols, the author of Blue Mind: The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected, & Better at What You Do. The book not only examines the critical importance of mankind’s connection to water but also seeks to provide a blueprint for how we can live a better life by understanding this connection.Nichols is here to tell us about the findings he details in the book about the critical importance of bodies of water to human health and well-being, as well as a movie also called Blue Mind that he’s making right now on the same subject. We had to take the opportunity to ask J, as Nichols prefers to be called, about his past work in sea turtle biology and conservation, as well.Our second guests are Ben Gottesman of the Center for Global Soundscapes at Purdue University and Emma Brinley Buckley of the Platte Basin Timelapse project. Gottesman and Buckley are using bioacoustics to document Sandhill cranes on the Platte River in the U.S. state of Nebraska as the birds make a stopover during their annual migration.Not only are the researchers seeking to understand how climate change might be impacting the cranes’ migratory habits, they’re also examining how environmental factors impact the behavior of other important species in the Platte River ecosystem, such as chorus frogs. We’ll hear recordings of both species and more besides in this Field Notes segment.Here are a couple soundscape timelapse videos Gottesman and Buckley have made pairing both audio and visual records of the Platte River ecosystem (you can see more of these videos in this “Intro to Sound-Scape Timelapses”): Here’s this episode’s top news:Cambodia creates its first marine national parkOil palm, rubber could trigger ‘storm’ of deforestation in the Congo BasinOnly 12 vaquita porpoises remain, watchdog group warnsTrump to allow elephant and lion trophies on case-by-case basisHonduras arrests alleged mastermind of Berta Cáceres’s murderJaguar numbers rising at field study sitesYou can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, Google Play, iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.Green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Dear Cloud: Connected things have brains, too

first_imgOne way to understand a market’s maturity is to look at how simplistically solutions are described. IoT has often been described as some sort of physical device that pipes sensor data into the cloud for deep learning. This is actually not a bad description. In fact, we do generally want to move as much intelligence as feasible to the commodity, high-power resources in the cloud. However, as IoT matures we’re realizing that it isn’t feasible for all of the intelligence to live in the cloud – it’s just not that simple.Context, security and performance drive us to distribute this intelligence not only to the gateways, but also to the edge devices (even resource-constrained devices). Which begs the question, why? Why intelligence on the gateway?I recently spoke with a prominent cloud IoT platform vendor who said that at least 85% of the IoT solutions he encountered had some sort of gateway. Gateways bridge between a local network of edge devices and the internet or intranet. They typically contain enough processing resources to support an OS such as Linux, making it easy for IT software programmers to transition to gateway programming. Programmers ideally abstract the software functions on the gateway behind service-oriented APIs (yes, running on the gateway) to further aid in cloud IoT platform integration. But why put software here in the first place?As a bridge between the internet and local network, the gateway has a certain context that makes it an ideal place for relevant decisions and intelligence. The local network is often running a different protocol stack than the backhaul network (think 802.15.4 vs. Cellular). It has to be able to adapt between these stacks. For battery-operated devices, the gateway may schedule and manage the traffic to the edge nodes. The gateway also serves as a prime location to house edge device and network logic, so that the cloud platform doesn’t have to understand all of the variations. Daniel Barnes, Director of Product Management, SynapseThe gateway makes decisions in many applications due to latency requirements. When you press your light switch, you expect the light to turn on in less than a second. If it doesn’t, you’ll probably press it again. If the decision takes place in the cloud, the event would be triggered at the edge device (your finger press), be transmitted to the cloud, a decision would be made, a resulting event would be sent to the light and then the light would turn on. The round-trip delay from edge to cloud and cloud to edge alone is difficult to accomplish in 100’s of milliseconds. IoT lighting control developers know this from experience (and logical deduction). The gateway has all of the context to make this decision and is located to be able to do this with an acceptable amount of latency.Security is one of those frustrating necessities of life. You never need it until you do and it’s always getting in the way of flexibility and performance. To make matters worse it isn’t a binary decision; it’s a gradient. How much security do you need? How much flexibility and performance are you willing to give up? Good news, the gateway gives you additional flexibility in your security implementation. The gateway limits the exposure of the edge devices in many architectures by providing a single point of control for all of the devices behind it. While some implementations allow direct IP access to the edge device, most either perform a NAT or even hide the edge devices behind a set of services on the gateway. Many IoT applications don’t have an internet connection and run on an on-premise server or even run entirely on the gateway.Gateway software often acts as a powered on-premise storage center due to cellular backhaul or as a fail-safe when the internet connection is lost. The gateway aggregates the data, may perform threshold-crossing analysis and even implement rules engines, all to keep from using the backhaul link except when necessary.Why intelligence on the edge device?Many IoT cloud platform vendors seem to have adopted the “If we build it, they will come” mentality, meaning if the cloud platform is provided, then people will just plug their things into it. Unfortunately, in business, there are no whispers in beautiful fields of grain, just cold, hard facts. Even though a cloud platform can perform deep learning with neural networks using distributed elastic compute resources, it’ll never produce any valuable insights without real data. That’s the cold, hard fact. IoT needs the cloud platform to produce insights and IoT needs the Things to generate the data to make the insights valuable. It’s true that the Things don’t need neural networks to generate the data, but they do need some intelligence – intelligence that requires software. This should scare every IT developer out there – it’s software alright, but it’s embedded software without your precious Linux and Java garbage collector. If I’m you (and I have been), then I’m really questioning the need for software on these embedded devices. Well, here are some considerations.The edge devices integrate with physical devices: with temperature sensors, light sensors, and vibration sensors, and legacy PLCs. These sensors have a variety of interfaces such as 0-10 Volt, 4-20 mA, and MODBUS over RS-232. This data could be communicated in its raw form to the cloud, but then the burden is on the cloud to understand a lot of detail about each and every device. Most IoT edge devices perform at least some of the conversion from the physical sensor/actuator to a logical set of information that is more generic for the cloud. For example, rather than interpret the voltage scale of a specific temperature sensor, the cloud platform can just read degrees Celsius. Battery-operated edge devices often implement a state machine in software to manage the power consumption. They behave in an active-processing mode for very short periods of time and then go into low-current sleep. The state machine on the edge device can’t tolerate the round-trip latency of remote cloud control between each state transfer. The cloud platform will often control the state of the device at a macro-level (such as wake for upgrade), but can’t possibly manage all of the specific actions necessary to perform the state transfers.The edge-devices often manage the performance of the local network as well as the number of data points the gateway and cloud platform are exposed to by making some local decisions. For example, a fire-extinguisher monitoring application may only send the level of the fire extinguisher fluid when it drops below a certain amount rather than periodically. I could continue to describe cases for software on the edge device such as encryption on mesh networks, immediate reaction and reliable data transfer. Suffice it to say that there is software on the edge devices. So, how will your IT developer write that software and how will you keep that software up to date? The good news is that there are Things platforms solving these problems. Some provide VM’s for separating the core OS and networking functions (generally written in C) from the user application (written in a language such as Python). These also provide the added benefit of remotely upgrading the user application separate from the core OS and networking.The IoT Things PlatformI initially introduced the need for a new type of IoT platform, the Things platform, in Welcome to yet another IoT Platform, describing the large set of needs not met by the IoT cloud platforms. In To recharge or not to recharge: A battery of IoT questions, I described a specific set of problems a Things platform should solve associated with long battery life. We need the IoT cloud platforms to do much of the heavy processing, but we need IoT Things platforms to answer the challenge of distributing intelligence to the Things. SNAP: The Things Platform is Synapse’s answer to the challenges of Things.This article was produced in partnership with Synapse Wireless Tags:#API Gateway#cloud computing#edge computing#IoT#Synapse Related Posts Follow the Puck Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfacescenter_img ReadWrite Sponsors Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to… Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You…last_img read more