Know your ESA: an online resource for Endangered Species Act docs and data

first_imgAnalysis, Conservation, data, Endangered, Endangered Species Act, Environmental Policy, Habitat, Law Enforcement, Technology, Wildlife, Wildtech The ever-increasing number of species needing protection, inadequate funding, and poor understanding of how and where the US Endangered Species Act (ESA) has been implemented have made it difficult to assess the law’s success.A free, online platform offers access to and analyses of troves of ESA-related documents and data—including otherwise unavailable materials—on species, agency consultations, decisions, and effectiveness.By making these data more accessible, the platform aims to help the conservation community better understand how the ESA is implemented and where it can improve. Do you know where your endangered species are?A new online tool offers access to and analyses of a wealth of documents and data related to the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA), included species distributions, land use decisions, and plans for habitat conservation and species recovery.45 years of endangered species conservationThe US established the ESA in 1973 to conserve endangered and threatened species and their habitats. It’s the country’s premier species conservation law, but the ever-increasing number of species needing protection, inadequate funding, and poor understanding of how and where it has been implemented have made assessing its success problematic, even for agency staff.The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) administer the ESA for terrestrial and freshwater species, and marine wildlife, respectively. These implementing agencies prioritize imperiled species, develop habitat conservation and species recovery plans, carry out recovery actions, and assess progress toward species’ recovery. Over 2,300 species (including 680 foreign species) are currently listed as endangered or threatened under the ESA.The black-footed ferret, found in six western US states, is threatened by loss of native grasslands and its main prey, prairie dogs, which are eliminated by ranchers in the American West. Photo credit: J. Michael Lockhart/USFWS CC.20The ESA protects imperiled species by prohibiting the “take” and the trade of listed animals and plants without a specific permit. “Take” applies to activities that harass, harm, pursue, trap, capture, or collect wildlife, including degradation of habitat sufficient to impair its breeding, feeding, or sheltering patterns.FWS offers extensive information about listed species on its website, but its data management systems make accessing data and documentation on the implementation of the law difficult for the conservation community, the public, and even other agencies.Expanding access to ESA recordsThe Center for Conservation Innovation (CCI) at the US non-profit Defenders of Wildlife has launched a web platform that integrates a series of free, online tools, data, and publications on how the law is implemented. The tools complement FWS’s species-specific information by making the extensive ESA documentation and data more accessible to other agencies and the public.In an email interview with Mongabay-Wildtech, CCI Director Ya-Wei Li and data scientist Jacob Malcom explained the impetus to launch the CCI platform. “The ESA remains the most comprehensive law ever enacted to save endangered species, yet we often have very little information about how the law works in practice,” said Malcom and Li. “In the past, a lot of perceptions about the ESA were based on anecdotes and case studies. Using data and technology, we’re painting a far more accurate picture of how this law is implemented. And what we see is cause for real concern, because the conservation challenge is even greater than what many in the public believe.”The site’s home page lists (in unspecified order) the various apps, analyses, and papers, or you can select tools from the drop-down menus. Several tools are still in beta development, and new tools are in the works.A screenshot from CCI’s home page showing drop-down menus, brief instructions, and three of the available apps. Image credit: CCIHere’s a sampling of what’s currently available:1— ESAdocs Search app: The over-arching ESAdocs Search engine allows you to search roughly 15,000 ESA-related documents and data on the platform. You use this tool as you would use Google or Bing, by entering a search term—such as a species’ common or scientific name or a place—and the engine lists all the documents it has containing that term. A search for “pronghorn” produced 50 matches of PDF documents, most of which were consultations, communications regarding federal agency actions that could affect the pronghorn population.You can filter the search by the type of document, such as a report, recovery plan, five-year review, publication, map, or even an interagency letter. The tool makes the text of every document searchable (even the thousands of FWS’s image-format PDF documents).“Full-text search enables new insights that can’t be gained from FWS’s web resources,” said Malcom. “For example, the project that resulted in the first-ever map of recovery units (found here) was only feasible once we could search the recovery plans for >1,200 species that have completed plans.”You can also download a spreadsheet table of results of your search, many of which include links to the downloadable PDF documents. Nevertheless, CCI labels this tool as “beta” because some complex searches are still slow, and the team is still adding to it.Those unfamiliar with the ESA might begin with several “Intro” apps that provide brief overviews of the issue and lead the user to answers.2— ESA listings and occurrences apps: Several apps provide tabular, graphic, and map-based summaries of ESA species listings, including the occurrence of listed species by county or the listed species found only in a single state. You can also filter and download data on these “intrastate” species—Hawaii predictably has the highest percentage of these (99.2%), followed by California, Texas, and Florida.Map of states shaded by the number of intrastate (single-state) listed species, part of one of CCI’s “Intro” apps. Hawaii, not surprisingly, given its isolation, has the most intrastate listed species. Image credit: CCIThe information on the FWS ECOS website offers helpful reports on ESA-listed species—including five-year species review and single-state species data— on a species-by-species basis, said Malcom, but does not permit high-level views or big-picture inquiries, such as seeing where in the US all bird or amphibian species have been listed or how the number of endangered species changes through time.3— Analysis of ESA decisions app: Many imperiled species current wait years to be considered for listing, and producing a recovery plan that articulates actions needed to protect a given species can take several years. This app analyzes and presents data tables and graphs extracted from a PDF-formatted FWS workplan used to evaluate and prioritize the ESA listing of hundreds of species. The app enables users to search, filter and sort the information.“Deep-dive” apps, which present more detailed assessments or analysis, are designed for readers familiar with the ESA. Access to some of these requires permission.4— An ESA expenditure app displays data from 2008-2013 from FWS annual reports, with amounts spent on specific species. Currently, the lack of a system for prioritizing funding means that a few better-known species get most of the funding.5— The Section 7 Explorer app displays maps and graphs of data on the 100,000 consultations with FWS by federal and state agencies, as required under Section 7 of the ESA. Federal agencies must support the ESA and “consult” with FWS or NMFS to ensure the development activities they authorize or support (such as road building, drilling, or logging projects) are not likely to harm listed species or critical habitats.The Section 7 Explorer allows you to filter the data to explore consultations for particular species, places, years, agencies, or types of development project. The data include more than 4,000 consultation documents that FWS has not made publicly available, many of which contain up-to-date information on species status, as well as background and glossary of terms for users with limited ESA experience.A screenshot from the Section 7 Explorer app, with statistics on agency consultations with the ESA implementing agencies. Image credit: CCI6— Analyses: Besides the apps, the platform presents analyses of ESA-related data, generated through ESA consultations and other findings, cover specific topics and are presented as reports and figures. Several of these analyses use data from FWS’s otherwise unavailable Tracking and Integrated Logging System (TAILS) database. For example, CCI analyzed how well the FWS tracks the amount of “take”—harming of a listed species—it authorizes. It found that the current amount of “take” is not well known. Despite the obvious importance of knowing how much harm to an endangered species has been authorized previously before permitting future take, these data were insufficient to do so.They also learned that roughly half of the inter-agency consultations reported the geographic coordinates of a project, and that certain regional offices were more likely to include coordinates in their reports. As the platform grows, CCI expects to expand the currently limited mapping/spatial data analysis component.Clearing of forest habitat, such as here in Oregon, in areas critical to a listed species would be an example of “take”. Photo credit: Calibas CC 3.07— Papers: CCI has published expanded versions of some analyses as papers. These include an assessment of species recovery plans that found nearly 25% of listed species lack recovery plans, plans take more than five years to finalize, and half are at least 19 years old. Another paper analyzed data on over 88,000 consultations and found they did not hinder economic development and took less time than conventional wisdom suggested.8— Working Papers are unpublished works in progress that describe ongoing projects, upcoming features, new ideas, and case studies. For example, a working paper on dynamic recovery provides several models to address the need to modernize species recovery plans. The ESA requires recovery plans for each listed species, but many plans are out of date.“Current recovery plans are static Adobe PDF documents that are rarely updated, making them less useful for conservation,” explained Malcom and Li. “We are…creating the first-ever web-based recovery plan that can be very easily updated, like how people update a Wikipedia page in a snap.”The modernized, online format has piqued the interest of both FWS and NMFS, as well as the US Department of Defense, which follows species plans on land it manages, and some of these plans are more than 30 years old. As it progresses, the CCI is writing up a brief analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the various dynamic recovery plan types.The palila honeycreeper, like many Hawaiian birds, is highly endangered by loss of habitat and avian malaria, to which they lack resistance from thousands of years of isolation. Brought by human-carried mosquitoes in the 1820s, the disease has already caused the extinction of multiple bird species. Photo credit: HarmonyonPlanetEarth-Flickr CC 2.0A tool for practitionersMany of the CCI tools target ESA practitioners with some understanding of how the law works.“Part of the issue was that FWS’s internal software doesn’t allow them run simple queries of their data and visualize the results,” said Malcom and Li. “We have stepped in and filled that void. That’s why FWS, other federal agencies, Congressional staff, and the regulated community use the [Section 7] Explorer regularly. For example, the US Forest Service has used the Section 7 Explorer to help answer Congressional inquiries about how the agency fulfills its duty to consult on the effects of their timber harvest and other projects.”Advocates have used the tools to answer questions relevant to current issues in Congress, such as the status of the required ESA-listed species five-year status reviews. “There are proposals in Congress to stop federal funding for species that are behind schedule on the reviews,” said Malcom and Li, “which would be very bad for ~54% of species that meet the criterion.”Learn more about the ESA in this helpful FWS introduction video: Article published by Sue Palmintericenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Top 10 HAPPY environmental stories of 2017

first_imgThroughout 2017, scientists discovered new populations of rare wildlife, and rediscovered some species that were previously thought to be extinct.Some countries created large marine protected areas, while a few others granted land rights to indigenous communities.In 2017, we also saw the ever-increasing potential of technology to improve conservation monitoring and efforts. The past year may have seemed like doom and gloom for the environment, but there was plenty to be thankful for. So once again, we bring you some of the happier environmental stories of 2017 (in no particular order). These include rediscoveries of species that were once thought to be extinct, local communities being granted land rights, and the emergence of new technologies that are boosting conservation efforts.1. New populations of rare wildlife were foundThis year, conservationists discovered some new populations of threatened wildlife. Take, for example, the helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil). A research team recorded a new and “unexpectedly rich population” of this critically endangered bird in western Borneo. For a species that is now nearly extinct because of poaching, this discovery boosts hope for its future.It was good news for the Grauer’s gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) as well. Surveys in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Maiko National Park revealed several previously uncounted individuals of Grauer’s gorillas in just 1 percent of the park. The researchers think that there might be many more gorillas living inside the largely unexplored 10,885-square-kilometer (4,000-square-mile) park.First-of-a-kind surveys of forests in Karen state in southeast Myanmar also yielded records of at least 31 species of mammals, including tigers, Asian elephants, Phayre’s langurs and dholes. The region was previously out-of-bounds for scientists due to security and political reasons. Similarly, surveys in Thailand’s Eastern Forest Complex revealed the world’s second known breeding population of Indochinese tigers (Panthera tigris corbetti), making Thailand home to two breeding populations of this tiger subspecies.Grauer’s gorilla. Photo by Joe McKenna via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).2. Lost and found: Some species were spotted after decades2017 was also a year of rediscoveries. A guard at a recently created amphibian reserve in the Cuchumatanes Mountain range in Guatemala, for example, chanced upon the brilliantly colored Jackson’s climbing salamander (Bolitoglossa jacksoni) more than 40 years after it was first recorded. A naturalist in India spotted an extremely rare cobra lily that had not been seen for nearly 80 years.Scientists also reported the rediscovery of the Táchira antpitta (Grallaria chthonia), a plump brown bird that was first recorded during an expedition in the mid-1950s in a remote part of the Andes in Venezuela. In yet another expedition exploring the western Amazon, a field guide spotted the Vanzolini’s bald-faced saki (Pithecia vanzolinii), a large black monkey with a long fluffy tail and golden fur, leaping from one tree branch to another. This was the first living evidence of this monkey in 80 years, researchers say.Vanzolini saki monkey in flooded forest along the Eiru River. Photo by Christina Selby.3. Papua New Guinea got its largest-ever conservation areaLast month, Papua New Guinea officially declared the Managalas Conservation Area, a 3,600-square-kilometer (1,390-square-mile) protected area in the country’s southeast, which stretches from near the ocean up into the mountains. Conservation organizations and local communities had been working toward this protection for 32 years. The Managalas Conservation Area hopes to protect the Managalas plateau from large-scale logging and mining operations.The Managalas Conservation Area encompasses 3,600 square kilometers of Papua New Guinea. Data source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, accessed through Global Forest Watch.4. Local researchers are taking on leadership roles in conservationFor decades, Western scientists have dominated conservation research in Madagascar. They have helped create and manage many of Madagascar’s protected areas and have played an integral role in defining the country’s conservation priorities. Some foreign researchers say that this foreign dominance has “limited the ability of biodiversity research to generate debate and influence Malagasy society more broadly.” But a series of programs, over the past decade or so, have aimed at boosting early-career Madagascan scientists and are now helping local researchers take on more leadership roles in conservation.Fanomezana Ratsoavina, center, in her lab on campus with two students preparing to defend their master’s theses. Photo by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.5. A U.S. subnational delegation bypassed Trump and committed to keeping America’s Paris goalIn June this year, U.S. President Donald Trump announced that the country would be pulling out of the Paris Agreement on climate change. He also said that his administration would not be paying for a pavilion at the U.N.’s climate summit held at Bonn, Germany, this year, that countries typically set up to showcase their climate actions. The U.S. federal government has sponsored such a pavilion for 22 years.In defiance of Trump, a rival coalition of U.S. governors, mayors, business and religious leaders paid for, and opened, an unofficial pavilion dubbed “America’s Pledge: We Are Still In.” This delegation, representing non-federal actors in 15 U.S. states, 455 cities, 1,747 businesses and 325 universities, proclaimed its commitment to the Paris Agreement on behalf of the American people. Governor Jerry Brown of California and former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg led the delegation.“The federal government doesn’t decide whether or how the U.S. takes action on climate change,” Bloomberg said at a standing-room-only event on Nov. 11. “Those decisions are made by cities, states, businesses and civil society. The goal of the federal government is to support and coordinate those efforts. But if Washington won’t lead, mayors, governors and CEOs will. And there is nothing Washington can do to stop us.”The U.S. subnationals gather at COP23. Former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg (left) greets Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto in Bonn, Germany, November 11, 2017. Photo credit: Bloomberg Philanthropies6. Philanthropists and companies made big commitments for the environmentWith Trump turning his back on climate change issues, philanthropists and big companies stepped up to tackle the problem.The Gates Foundation, for example, announced a $300 million grant to support agriculture research that would help farmers in Africa and Asia adapt to climate change. The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation also announced a $600 million donation over five years, from 2018 to 2023, to nonprofits that are working on climate change solutions.Other foundations have pledged their support for conservation efforts. The U.S.-based Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, for example, has announced $20 million in grants to local and global nonprofit organizations that are working in the areas of conservation, human rights and the environment. The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has announced a five-year, $50 million grant to address the environmental degradation of the Andes-Amazon region by ongoing infrastructure projects like roads and dams. At the same time, the Switzerland-based Oak Foundation has committed $100 million to support ocean conservation activities, including the prevention of illegal fishing, support for small-scale fishery governance, protection of marine ecosystems and livelihoods, and a reduction in the plastic pollution in oceans.Coral, damselfish and anemones in Komodo, Indonesia. Photo: Rhett A. Butler.7. Indigenous land rights were granted to communitiesIndigenous and rural communities in Indonesia are slowly reclaiming their ancestral rights to their land. In December last year, the Indonesian government for the first time recognized the rights of nine indigenous communities to the forests they have traditionally called home. This year, it granted land rights to some more indigenous communities. So far, the administration has restored the rights to 164 square kilometers (63 square miles) of land to indigenous communities. However, critics say that this falls short of what the country’s president promised in his 2014 election campaign. Indonesia’s main indigenous alliance, AMAN, is campaigning to reclaim rights to more than 6,600 square kilometers (2,548 square miles) of customary lands in the country.In another rare victory for indigenous communities, Brazil’s Temer government, which has previously attacked indigenous rights, established the 12,000-square-kilometer (4,630-square-mile) Indigenous Territory of Turubaxi-Téa along the Middle Negro River in Amazonas state.Indigenous groups in Enrekang district, South Sulawesi province, submitted on Oct. 26 a proposal to the Indonesian government to obtain rights to their forests. Photo by Wahyu Chandra/Mongabay Indonesia.8. Large marine reserves were createdNiue, a small island country in the South Pacific with a population of just 1,600, established a new marine protected area that covers 40 percent of the island’s exclusive economic zone. Through the 127,000-square-kilometer (49,000-square-mile) marine reserve, the government of Niue hopes to protect its fish stocks and help reduce overfishing of threatened fish species.In September this year, Chile announced a 740,000-square-kilometer (285,700-square-mile) marine reserve around its remote Easter Island. The Rapa Nui Rahui Marine Protected Area region is home to over 140 marine species found nowhere else on Earth, and the park will not allow industrial fishing, mining and other extractive activities. In October, Chile announced the creation of two more marine reserves. At 117,000 square kilometers (45,170 square miles), one of the new reserves covers the ocean off Diego Ramírez Islands, off South America’s Cape Horn, while the second protected area, at 484,000 square kilometers (186,870 square miles), lies around the Juan Fernández Islands in the southern Pacific.Mexico has also announced the expansion of the Revillagigedo marine park to create the largest marine reserve of its kind in North America to protect sharks, rays, whales, turtles and other important marine species. At about 150,000 square kilometers (57,900 square miles), the park will surround four Revillagigedo Islands.The waters off Revillagigedo Islands are home to giant manta rays. Photo by Elias Levy via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).9. New technologies are boosting conservation effortsThis year we saw the ever-increasing potential of technology to improve conservation monitoring and efforts. The international Barcode of Life initiative, for example, has developed a new LifeScanner Lab-In-A-Box portable DNA barcoding kit that can be used by rangers, police and port-of-entry officials to rapidly identify the species of plant and animal samples found on suspected smugglers. Another team has developed a handheld portable DNA sequencing device that allows it to identify plants faster than before in the field. Researchers have also adapted widely used technologies, like thermal imaging video technology, to detect the impact of white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats.Advancements in technologies have boosted the involvement of non-scientists in conservation — from contributing to polar bear identification to counting trees and monitoring their leafing, flowering and fruiting cycles. Scientists are also developing better robots that could potentially help in monitoring wildlife.The LifeScanner Lab-In-A-Box, a portable DNA barcoding laboratory, is a new tool to help rangers, police, customs agents and other officials quickly determine whether wildlife samples are endangered, invasive or legally traded. Photo credit: Rob O’Flanagan, University of Guelph.10. See: The top 20 new species of 20172017 was an exciting year for species discoveries. Scientists reported a new species of orangutan, the first full species of great ape described since the Bonobo from the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1929. The newly described Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) lives in Sumatra, Indonesia, and may be the most endangered great ape on the planet.Expeditions across the world revealed many more species previously unknown to Western science. One team of scientists discovered 19 new species of geckos within limestone hill caves in Myanmar. Others uncovered 50 new spider species in Australia, several new species of frogs in India, and two primates: a new species of dwarf lemur in Madagascar, and a new species of bushbaby in the forests of Angola.You can see the photos of the top new species of 2017 here.The newly described Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) in Indonesia. Photo by Maxime Aliaga. Animals, Biodiversity, Climate, Climate Change, Conservation, Conservation Technology, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Technology, Trees, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Muskox and other Arctic mammals are feeling the heat of climate change

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extinction, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Extreme Weather, Forgotten Species, Global Warming, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Hurricanes, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Research, Storms, Weather, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Past studies have looked at Arctic climate change impacts on wildlife primarily among marine animals and with polar bears, but there is little data on most terrestrial mammals.Now, As part of a broader attempt to develop an ecological baseline for Arctic wildlife, researchers have focused on muskoxen, the least studied mammal in North America.According to a new study, increasingly common extreme weather events – such as rain-on-snow and extremely dry winter conditions occurring in Russia and Alaska during muskox gestation – result in smaller head size among muskox young. Smaller animals generally have poor survivorship rates.Scientists say that, with the Arctic warming twice as fast as the world average, new studies are urgently needed on cold climate mammals including muskoxen, reindeer and caribou, to determine how rapidly escalating climate change up North is impacting wildlife, habitats and ecosystems. Muskoxen take up a defense position. These large mammals are well suited to protecting themselves against Arctic extremes, but they may not be so well equipped to handle the rigors of climate change. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation SocietyIn Greenland’s Arctic, the Inuit have a word to describe a bizarre, natural phenomenon that occurs within the frozen landscape: Sassat, which translates as “concentrated animals offered as food.” This word has historically encompassed a range of scenarios, including the spectacular sea ice entrapment of 150 narwhals, 170 belugas and uncounted sea otters in southern Berinigia across the historical record.Increasingly, though, sassats aren’t limited to marine mammals. A Chukchi Sea winter tsunami in 2011, for example, entombed 52 wooly muskox and killed them. The effects of a changing ocean/climate are coming ashore in the Arctic.Once rare extreme weather events like rain-on-snow, ice tidal surges, and severely fluctuating winter precipitation have become characteristic of the new Arctic, and scientists want to know exactly how these weather and climate patterns are impacting the region’s animal populations.Mother and newborn muskox, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Alaska. Scientists have found that increasingly common extreme weather events, such as rain-on-snow and extremely dry winter conditions occurring in Russia and Alaska during muskox gestation, result in smaller head size among muskoxen young, with smaller animals having poor survivorship rates. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation SocietyA yearling on the run, Igichuk Hills, Alaska. The muskox is the least studied mammal in North America. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation SocietyScientists Joel Berger (left) and Freddy Goodhope Jr. (right), Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Alaska. Photo by Ellen ChengAs part of a broader attempt to develop an ecological baseline for Arctic wildlife, researchers have recently focused on muskox, the least studied mammal in North America. “Across a range of species, we’re seeing direct and indirect effects of warming which affect a lot of different parameters of animals’ biology,” said Joel Berger, a senior scientist at the Wildlife Conservation Society.In a recent study presented in Scientific Reports, Berger and his co-authors found that the head size of juvenile muskox in Russia and Alaska was smaller, and negatively impacted after extremely dry winter conditions and rain-on-snow events during gestation.The likely cause: warming temperatures have altered air velocity and how long sea ice stays in the Arctic, which in turn has modified oceans currents and the timing and intensity of precipitation. More rain is now reaching some inland areas than snow in the winter months. If temperatures drop below freezing, the ground can ice over, requiring muskox to exert more energy to access food. Conversely, rain without freezing temperatures can make it easier for the animals to reach plants by reducing the snowpack. But without insulation, plant productivity can decline during the next growing season. If mothers are unable to meet the nutritional needs of their gestating babies, muskox young will suffer the consequences.Over seven years, researchers examined the head size of muskox at three different study sites in the Russian and Alaskan Arctic using telephoto lenses and rangefinders. Marci Johnson, then a biologist with the U.S. National Park Service based in Kotzebue, Alaksa, assisted with radio tracking collared animals, while other research parties traveled by snowmachine for hundreds of miles across drifted snow. “Sometimes it would take them a day to travel between two groups of muskoxen,” Johnson said, describing the difficulties of doing such a study.Ultimately, the researchers found that the smallest one- to two-year-old muskox in the dataset occurred after the winter of 2007-2008 when no precipitation occurred between October and April. The largest head sizes followed the wettest winter in their data. (On the Tibetan Plateau, endangered wild yaks, a family relative of muskox, have been shown to have less lactation when snow is scarce.) For three-year-old muskox, the largest animals were those that experienced no rain-on-snow events during gestation.The East Asian sector of Bergingia on Wrangell Island experienced two times more frequent rain-on-snow events, colder temperatures and shorter growing seasons than conditions at Alaskan study sites. As a result, Wrangell Island muskox were smaller than their Alaskan relatives.A newborn muskox. Researchers have determined that certain extreme weather events, now more common due to climate change, are causing smaller head size in muskox young. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation SocietyA pair of two-year-old muskoxen. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society“The broader issue dealing with juvenile sizes is that smaller animals have poor survivorship,” says Berger. “We know that [to be true] for a wide range of species. For muskox, we’re using head size as an index to understand questions about population health and population trajectories.”Because so little baseline data exists on muskox, it’s unknown how smaller muskox, or fewer muskox, could be affecting their surrounding habitat and ecosystem; what plants, birds, and other mammals could be impacted. Importantly, what this and other research shows, is that polar bears are no longer the only terrestrial mammals feeling the heat in the Arctic.In coming years, scientists hope to expand their knowledge of how climate change impacts terrestrial mammals throughout the Arctic. Several recent studies have, for example, examined the impact of icing on reindeer and caribou herds there. It’s long been believed that the periodic icing of reindeer and caribou winter ranges is a cause of mass starvation, extirpation of local populations, and catastrophic declines in numbers. But a 2016 study found that there are few datasets showing hard snow or ice present on ranges where populations declined in the winter. Rather, climatic conditions associated with more snow or winter warming were found to increase animal abundance in established populations.Berger and other scientists agree that – with the Arctic warming twice as fast as the world average – deeper research into impacts on Arctic mammals and ecosystems is urgently needed.Muskoxen, raindeer, caribou and other Arctic mammals are likely all being stressed by climate change, but more Arctic research is required to determine specific stressors, their processes and impacts. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation SocietyCitations:Berger, J. et al. Climate Degradation and Extreme Icing Events Constrain Life in Cold-Adapted Mammals. (2018) Scientific Reports. 8. Article 1156Tyler, N. J. C. Climate, snow, ice, crashes, and declines in populations of reindeer and caribou (Rangifer tarandus L.) (2010). Ecol. Monogr. 80, 197–219FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Muskoxen eyeball nearby researchers. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation SocietyResearcher Freddy Goodhope Jr. with maps. Arctic research is made difficult by challenging terrain and formidable winter weather. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation SocietyAdult male muskoxen on Wrangel Island, Chukotka, Russia. Photo by Sergei AbarokThe remote mountainous habitat of the Arctic muskox in Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Alaska. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation SocietyA group of muskoxen on Wrangel Island, Chukotka, Russia. Over a period of seven years, researchers examined the head size of muskox at three different study sites in the Russian and Alaskan Arctic using telephoto lenses and rangefinders. Photo by Sergei AbarokAdult female muskox at Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Alaska. Photo by Joel Berger courtesy of the Wildlife Conservation Society Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Two new dog-faced bats discovered in Panama and Ecuador

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Bats, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, New Species, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife Researchers have described two new species of dog-faced bats: the Freeman’s dog-faced bat (Cynomops freemani) from Panama and the Waorani dog-faced bat (Cynomops tonkigui) from Ecuador.The Freeman’s dog-faced bat was named after bat specialist Patricia Freeman.The species name of the Waorani dog-faced bat, “tonkigui,” honors the Waorani tribe of Ecuador that lives near one of the locations where the bats were captured, the study says. For the past few decades, scientists have known of six species of fast-flying, insect-eating bats with dog-like faces — collectively called the dog-faced bats.Now, a group of researchers has described two more species of dog-faced bats in a new study published in Mammalian Biology: the Freeman’s dog-faced bat (Cynomops freemani) from Panama and the Waorani dog-faced bat (Cynomops tonkigui) from Ecuador.Researchers from the Panama-based Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) first came across the Freeman’s dog-faced bat inside abandoned wooden houses in the town of Gamboa in 2012. Over the course of five nights, the team captured 56 bats using specialized mist nets, took their measurements, then released them. They also recorded the bats’ calls and collected one individual that had died.At the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in Washington, D.C, the scientists compared their field observations, including DNA, sound recordings and body measurements of the bats, with existing museum collections from across the Americas and Europe, and confirmed that the bat was new to science. They named it Freeman’s dog-faced bat after Patricia Freeman, a bat specialist currently at the University of Nebraska State Museum of Natural History.“We were very lucky to catch several different individuals of this species in mist nets and to record their calls,” Thomas Sattler, who was one of the team members in Panama at the time of collection, told Smithsonian Insider. “Knowing their species-specific echolocation calls may make it possible to find them again in the future with a bat detector — without catching them—and to find out more about their distribution and habitat preferences.”In fact, some STRI staff recently spotted pregnant females of the species in Gamboa in August 2017, and some young individuals the following month.Thomas Sattler holds two Freeman’s dog-faced bats discovered in Gamboa, Panama. Photo: Elias BaderThe Smithsonian team described the second new species — the slightly smaller Waorani dog-faced bat — from individuals collected by other naturalists and researchers from Ecuador’s rainforests. The team did not have any call recordings of the bats, so they confirmed its status by comparing the bats’ physical measurements and DNA with those of other museum specimens collected in Ecuador.“Identifying two mammal species new to science is extremely exciting,” Ligiane Moras, lead author of the study who did part of this work as a fellow at NMNH, said in a statement.Rachel Page of STRI added: “Molecular tools combined with meticulous morphological measurements are opening new doors to the diversity of this poorly understood group. This discovery begs the question — what other new species are there, right under our very noses? What new diversity is yet to be uncovered?”A Waorani dog-faced bat. Photo by Diego Tirira.The newly described Freeman’s dog-faced bat. Photo by Thomas Sattler.Citation:Moras, L. M., et al. (2017). Uncovering the diversity of dog-faced bats from the genus Cynomops (Chiroptera. Molossidae), with the redescription of C. milleri and the description of two new species. Mammalian Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.mambio.2017.12.005.center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

Keeping carbon in the ground can cut emissions and boost food security, study finds

first_imgAgriculture, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Sequestration, Climate Change, Environment, food security, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Interns, Land Use Change, Research, Soil Carbon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img A new paper finds that a carbon tax meant to shift agricultural policies could raise food prices and threaten food security.However, improvements in storing carbon in the world’s soils could lessen the potential for worsening food security.The researchers suggest a globally coordinated effort on climate-friendly agriculture and land use would likely result in the best outcome for all. A new study in Environmental Research Letters shows that applying a theoretic carbon tax — one aimed at stimulating changes to farming and land-use practices that minimize emissions —could have a major impact on food security, resulting in as many as 300 million more people suffering food deprivation. But add soil carbon-friendly farming into the mix, and you could limit the impact on food security and reduce calorie loss by 65 percent while at the same time sequestering more carbon in the ground.“Soil carbon sequestration can help to address climate change, and because it also helps to increase productivity, can also help to address food security,” said study co-author Peter Smith, an expert in soils and climate change from Aberdeen University in the U.K. Agriculture is responsible for 10 to 12 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Given the growing global population, experts expect agricultural emissions to continue to rise.Not all farming practices contribute to emissions equally, however. In fact, there is a growing awareness of farming techniques that remove carbon from the atmosphere, a process known as carbon sequestration, storing it in plant material and soils.Locking carbon on the farmDuring photosynthesis, plants absorb carbon dioxide. As they grow, the carbon is stored in their stems, leaves and roots. Once the plant dies or its leaves drop, soil microbes break down the material they leave behind. Some carbon is then re-released into the atmosphere, but a percentage can become stabilized and locked in the soil.Scientists have found that certain farming practices can increase the amount of carbon sequestered in the soil. These include zero tillage, in which the soil isn’t disturbed by being cultivated or turned over; crop rotation, or growing different types of crops over several seasons on the same land; and cover cropping, where certain plants are grown primarily to benefit the soil rather than as a crop. As an added bonus, these practices that increase carbon sequestration often reduce soil erosion and help to retain important nutrients in the soil. The result is healthier soil and increased yields. A Colombian cornfield. Agricultural practises such as crop rotation, over cropping and zero tillage can minimize carbon loss and increase soil carbon sequestration. Photo credit: Rhett ButlerIt was these potential “win-win” benefits that led a team of researchers headed by Stefan Frank, from the Austria-based International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), to model the potential benefits of implementing carbon-sequestering farming practices. Using the Global Biosphere Management Model (GLOBIOM) developed by IIASA, the team found that storing carbon in soil could play an important role in reducing agricultural emissions. Combining a widespread change to carbon-sequestering farming practices with a carbon tax, GLOBIOM predicted a potential reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture of 11.4 gigatons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year. That’s 44 percent higher than the 7.9 gigatons achievable with only a carbon tax. That difference of 3.5 gigatons of CO2e would be roughly the same as taking just over half the world’s cars, 583 million, off the roads. There are caveats to the findings, though. Like any model, the accuracy of GLOBIOM’s output is ultimately determined by the assumptions underpinning it. As the study’s authors note, the reason predictive models have not previously included soil carbon sequestration is that it’s incredibly complex. One of the key issues is the difficulty in measuring changes in soil carbon. “Across a field … a change in 0.1 percent is a huge amount of carbon either being stored or released, but it’s really difficult to measure that change sensitively and accurately,” said Vanessa Bailey, a soil carbon expert from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in Washington state, who was not involved in the study. There is a great amount of variation in the soil carbon across a field, Bailey said. “If you take a sample in a depression there might be 1.1 percent carbon there just because we’ve had runoff there,” she said. A peat bog being drained in Kalimantan. The lack of oxygen due to wet conditions in peat bogs prevents the peat from breaking down. When peat bogs dry out they start to decompose and large quantities of stored carbon are released to the atmosphere. Photo credit: Rhett ButlerThe soil carbon cycle is also a two-way street. Under certain conditions, such as when peat is exposed and allowed to dry out, the soil becomes a major emitter of carbon. Another issue is that soil can only capture so much carbon before it becomes saturated, a point known as soil carbon equilibrium.This means that soil carbon sequestration may not be a long-term solution, but, according to Smith, could contribute “to a medium term solution while we fully decarbonise all sectors.”Research has so far mainly focused on how to stabilize carbon in soil, but there is still a lot to learn about what destabilizes carbon in soil. “We don’t have a good way of assessing how long this new carbon … persists in soils,” Bailey said. “That’s the other side of the coin we don’t understand.”Because soil carbon sequestration is such a complex subject, scientists continue to debate exactly how much carbon could be stored in soils. Certainly no one believes soil carbon sequestration can mitigate all manmade emissions. Soil could potentially sequester 1.5 gigatons to 2.6 gigatons CO2e per year — about 5 percent of manmade greenhouse gas emissions, Smith said. David Powlson, a leading soil scientist at Rothamsted Research in the U.K., who wasn’t involved in the study, was more cautious. “I am concerned that many colleagues seem over optimistic about the amount of carbon that can be locked up this way,” he said.In a recent study, Powlson evaluated the potential of the French government’s “4 per 1,000” initiative to increase global soil carbon stocks by 0.4 percent per year. Based on his research, Powlson said he believed agricultural practices that increase carbon sequestration “are limited by practical and economic factors.” “[M]any ‘good practices’ are already being applied in many places, so scope for [expanding carbon-sequestering farming practices] is further limited,” he said.Deforestation in Belize for cattle ranching. Land use change is one of the major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. Photo credit: Rhett ButlerThe food security wrenchAnother important area that the team was keen to investigate was the impact on food security of tax measures to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Land-use change and agriculture, as major emitters, have long been the focus of much mitigation research. However, with the global population expected to reach 9.8 billion by 2050, scientists are faced with the difficult proposition of simultaneously reducing emissions even as the human population looks to continue growing. A carbon tax would theoretically increase the cost of farming practices that produce high greenhouse gas emissions. This cost would then be passed on to consumers as higher food prices. As prices rise, producers and consumers will, in theory, alter their behavior and switch to products and practices with lower greenhouse gas emissions because they are cheaper. At first glance this would seem like an ideal solution. But the GLOBIOM model highlights an important problem: If global warming is to be limited to 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2050, the aspirational target set in the Paris Agreement, then major changes will be required from the agriculture and land-use sector. Potential changes range from technical solutions such as the use of anaerobic digesters (which break down waste to produce fuel) to broader structural solutions, such as shifting production across regions. According to Frank’s predictions, a carbon tax sufficient to stimulate this change in behavior would increase the cost of food so much that, theoretically, every person would consume on average 285 kilocalories less per day. GLOBIOM predicts that over the next 20 years, economic development will reduce chronic undernourishment from its current level of 850 million to 200 million. However, with a carbon tax in place, the higher cost of food could reverse some of that progress, resulting in an additional 300 million people unable to meet their calorie requirements.GLOBIOM’s predictions suggest that sequestering more carbon in soils could reduce the carbon tax required, cutting calorie loss by 65 percent while still hitting the 1.5-degree target.It’s important to note, however, that when predicting scenarios without a carbon tax, GLOBIOM does not model the impact of climate change on food security. As Smith says, the food security consequences if we do not act on climate change will certainly be far worse than if we do.“Massive losses of productivity for crops and livestock, mostly in countries already at risk of food insecurity,” he said, “so there is no option to just let it happen.” Unequal risk, unequal rewardsAs is so often the case with climate change, the impacts would be far from evenly distributed. For those in developed countries, where food costs a relatively small percentage of income, a hypothetical rise in price is not likely to greatly affect consumption. In the developing world, where food can cost a large proportion of people’s income, a rise in food costs could prove devastating. There is also a major imbalance in the mitigation potential available to different countries depending on the type of agriculture and how much standing forest remains. In land-rich countries like Brazil, where a large proportion of emissions stem from converting rainforest to cropland or for grazing, targets can be met by limiting deforestation and forest degradation with little impact on food cost. “Reducing emissions from land use change is a very cost-efficient and important strategy,” Frank said. However, in densely populated countries like India, most agricultural emissions come from food production. The carbon tax required to stimulate agricultural change could have a major impact on the cost of food there. With such stark regional differences, the authors emphasize the importance of a globally coordinated strategy. The GLOBIOM model predicts that any scenario without full global buy-in would result in a worse impact to food security than a globally coordinated approach. For Frank, the show of global support for the Paris Agreement offers a glimmer of hope.“Personally I hope that the momentum of the Paris Agreement will be maintained and even further strengthen[ed] so that we can achieve this tremendous challenge,” he said.Cattle ranching in Colombia. Livestock production produces a large quantity of greenhouse gas emissions. The methane produced by cows is 30 times more heat trapping than carbon dioxide. Photo credit: Rhett ButlerNo simple answersPromoting farming practices that help store carbon in the soil could help offset the side effects of carbon tax policies, but more must be done to tackle climate change on a wider scale, Smith said. “It’s not a climate solution in itself — but makes a valuable contribution toward addressing climate change,” he said.“We really have to balance sequestration with mitigation with adaption to new conditions,” Bailey added. “That’s the three legs of a stool we all have to be aware of.” For Powlson, changes in human consumption patterns and behavior are also key. “It’s almost certainly necessary that we reduce food consumption and eat less meat,” he said. Although the exact findings of any model can be open to debate, this study emphasizes the important relationship between soil carbon, food security and tackling climate change.“There are no magic bullets,” Smith said. “It will be tough, but it has to be done.” References:Frank, S., Havlík, P., Soussana, J. F., Levesque, A., Valin, H., Wollenberg, E., … & Smith, P. (2017). Reducing greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture without compromising food security?. Environmental Research Letters, 12(10), 105004.Poulton, P., Johnston, J., MacDonald, A., White, R., & Powlson, D. Major limitations to achieving “4 per 1000 ″increases in soil organic carbon stock in temperate regions: evidence from long‐term experiments at Rothamsted Research, UK. Global Change Biology.last_img read more

How to help penguins (photos)

first_imgWCS Wild View Posts on Penguins Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This photo essay comes via Mongabay’s partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Wild View blog.Once a month we’ll publish a contribution from Wild View that highlights an animal species or group.This month, the Wildlife Conservation Society’s David Oehler, Megan Maher, and Julie Larsen Maher write about penguins.All photos by Julie Larsen Maher, head photographer for WCS. Penguins are found in the Southern Hemisphere and come in all sizes ranging from 13 to 48 inches in height. The smallest is the little penguin from Australia and New Zealand; the largest is the emperor penguin of Antarctica.While these birds cannot fly through the air, they are very adept at using their wings to propel themselves through the water. Some penguins can dive to depths of about 1,750 feet. Their dark and light feathers are tightly packed — 70 feathers per square inch — keeping them insulated in the cold conditions of the marine environment where they live.Chinstrap penguins are found in Antarctica and the world’s other southernmost islands. Changing ocean conditions affect their main food source, krill. Credit: © Julie Larsen Maher / WCSPenguins are social animals that live in colonies like this one of chinstrap penguins characterized by noisy vocalizations. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCSPenguins are noisy and use various calls to attract mates, find their chicks, frighten off would-be predators, or just fuss with their neighboring penguins. Several species have distinctive calls. Magellanic and gentoo penguins bray. Chinstrap penguins scream, causing quite a cacophony in their colonies.Today, penguins are in trouble. They depend on the sea for food and coastal lands to nest, rear their chicks, and molt. Close to two-thirds of the world’s 17 penguin species face population pressures from threats like overfishing, oil spills, and man-made changes to the birds’ environment.Macaroni penguins are among the penguin species that live farthest south in the sub-Antarctic islands. They are one of six penguin species that have colorful crests of feathers. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher © WCS.Macaroni penguins are among the penguin species that live farthest south in the sub-Antarctic islands. They are one of six penguin species that have colorful crests of feathers. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher © WCS.While penguins cannot fly through the air, they are very adept at using their wings to propel themselves through the water like this macaroni penguin. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCSHere are some ways to help protect penguins:Seafood Watch Lists – Being a responsible consumer is critical. Read watch lists to ensure the seafood you eat is caught or raised sustainably. Through management of fisheries, marine protected areas, and community participation, fish populations and ecosystems can rebound. Preventing further damage to marine environments will have a positive impact on the health of penguin colonies dependent on these habitats.Oil Spills – This form of pollution is lethal to marine environments, including those of penguins. Make sure human activities do not contribute to the problem. Check fuel and oil lines on vehicles and homes for good condition, and do not dump old oil products into drains. Accidental spills of any pollutants remain in ecosystems and have been shown to accumulate in polar regions.Carbon Footprint – Help reduce carbon emissions to slow climate change. Dynamic changes produce rapid alterations in marine environments and within the food chains that are involved. Take action to help penguins survive by making simple changes like turning off lights when not in use or when you leave the room, or using LED light bulbs.Support Conservation Work – Organizations like WCS are continually working to conserve biodiversity and concentrations of marine wildlife. Establishing marine protected areas is important to preserve regions that penguins depend on for their survival.King penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus)King penguins are from Chile and are the second largest of the penguin species standing nearly 3 feet tall. Credit: © David Oehler / WCSKing penguin chicks are covered in fluffy brown down that is warm on land, but not when wet. The young birds can’t go into the water until they have acquired their adult feathers. © Julie Larsen Maher / WCSRockhopper penguin (Eudyptes sp)Rockhoppers are among the smallest penguins at about 22 inches tall. Their food supply has become scarce in South America. Credit: © David Oehler / WCSMagellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus)Magellanic penguins leave their coastal homes in Argentina, Chile, and the Falkland Islands in the winter and then return to the same burrows every year. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCSMagellanic penguins leave their coastal homes in Argentina, Chile, and the Falkland Islands in the winter and then return to the same burrows every year. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCSBlack-footed penguin (Spheniscus demersus)Black-footed penguins are also known as African or jackass penguins. They have a donkey-like bray and are found on the southwestern coast of Africa from Namibia to South Africa. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCSBlack-footed penguin chicks are covered in downy feathers. As they grow, their plumage becomes a combination of down and adult feathers that resemble a Mohawk haircut. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCSLittle penguin (Eudyptula sp)Little penguins are the smallest of the 17 penguin species at just 13 inches in height. Their home range is Australia and New Zealand. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCSGentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua)Gentoo penguins look as if they are wearing a bonnet of white where feathers cover the tops of their heads. They live on the Antarctic Peninsula. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS The Authors: David Oehler is curator of ornithology at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo. Julie Larsen Maher is staff photographer for WCS. Megan Maher is a graduate student and works for WCS.center_img Article published by Rhett Butler Animals, Archive, Birds, Endangered Species, Environment, Penguins, Photos, Wildlife last_img read more

Soulpepper scandal a wakeup call for Canadian theatre industry

first_img Facebook Twitter Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment TORONTO – The sexual misconduct lawsuits filed this week against Soulpepper Theatre Company and its founding artistic director are serving as a wake-up call to similar organizations throughout Canada’s arts scene, industry members say.Companies said efforts to tackle sexual harassment in the field were under way long before four actresses levelled explosive allegations against Albert Schultz and Soulpepper last week.Diana Bentley, Hannah Miller, Patricia Fagan and Kristin Booth alleged in their statements of claim that Schultz groped them, exposed himself, pressed against them or otherwise behaved inappropriately. Schultz, who resigned from Soulpepper on Thursday, said he will “vigorously defend” himself against the allegations, which have not been tested in court.While concerns about harassment were already on the industry radar, the Soulpepper situation will probably ensure they receive more attention in the coming months, said Mark Aikman, director of development and communications at Toronto’s Buddies in Bad Times Theatre.“Certainly it’s a wake-up call and a reminder that no place, no industry, is immune from that kind of thing,” he said.Aikman, who said his organization is still reeling from the shock of the Soulpepper news, did not speculate on whether concrete changes were coming at the company. But he said Buddies in Bad Times will continue with a months-long initiative to provide resources to performers who have concerns or anxieties about sexual harassment on the job.Those resources are provided as part of a campaign launched by the Canadian Actors Equity Association, working in conjunction with the Professional Association of Canadian Theatres. The anti-harassment effort, dubbed Not in Our Space, came about after a survey of live performers across the country.Equity said in a statement that the results clearly indicated action was needed. Half of all participants reported experiencing some form of inappropriate behaviour in their workplace, with women twice as likely as men to report they’d been sexually harassed.Not in Our Space promotes a zero tolerance approach, with participating theatres adopting a statement to that effect on the first day of rehearsal for any new production. Theatres in the program must also prominently display brochures and posters that let performers know what help is available. Equity said the number of people coming forward has increased since the campaign began, but did not provide specific figures.Equity also said a meeting of people involved in the live performance sector will take place later this month to discuss an industry-wide response.Numerous theatre companies, including Toronto-based Factory Theatre, the Royal Manitoba Theatre Company and Ottawa’s National Arts Centre (NAC) have all signed up for the Not in Our Space program.Some, however, felt the need for further action.The NAC said it launched a review of its sexual harassment policy this week in response to the Schultz case.Communications director Carl Martin said issues around harassment are high priorities for the company, citing English theatre artistic director Jillian Keiley’s decision to hire an intimacy coach while working on past productions for other organizations.Intimacy coaches, Martin said, carefully choreograph scenes involving physical contact to ensure no boundaries are crossed. While no such coach has been hired for NAC productions, Martin said it would not be surprising to see such a move in the future.“The artistic leadership here is quite attuned to these issues and very forward-thinking about these issues,” he said.Keiley hired the intimacy coach while working at Ontario’s Stratford Festival. The move was one of several measures spokesperson Ann Swerdfager pointed to as part of that company’s effort to maintain a safe workplace.Other moves included establishing a discussion group for women in the theatre, she said.In 2018, Stratford plans to implement more staff training and tighten reporting protocols.“One of the things we are learning from recent events is the vital importance of ensuring that there are safe, sure and clear ways to report harassment, should it occur,” Swerdfager said in a statement. “As a result, not only are we working to strengthen the policy, but also to find effective communications measures to ensure everyone who works at the festival is aware of it and of how to raise a concern if the policy is not being followed.”Halifax-based Neptune Theatre said it, too, is reviewing its long-standing sexual harassment policies and reporting procedures.Spokesperson Michael Browne said the company’s artistic director, Jeremy Webb, is committed to making the theatre a more respectful space for all, starting with the performer audition process.“He has requested agents/artists stop the practice of listing an actor’s height, weight and other measurements on resumes,” Browne said.The Cultch in Vancouver has long offered anonymity to anyone wanting to report issues of harassment.Executive director Heather Redfern said the predominately female-run theatre organization gives staff a number of avenues to report problems, including speaking to the board of directors, so they can find someone they trust.Redfern said the recent allegations of sexual harassment in the industry also points to the lack of women in positions of power.“You don’t fix things until you actually start to see that shifting and you start to see some equality there,” she said. “I’m an optimist. It feels like real change is finally happening.”By MICHELLE MCQUIGGE – The Canadian Presscenter_img Jillian Keiley hired an intimacy coach while working at the Stratford Festival to maintain a safe workplace. (CHRIS YOUNG / THE CANADIAN PRESS FILE PHOTO) Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With:last_img read more

ChoupoMoting and Mbappé share joy after Sunday match victory

first_imgParis Saint-Germain forward Eric Maxim Choupo-Moting has described their club’s 2-0 win against Marseille on Sunday as classic while teammate forward Kylian Mbappe adds that their side needed the victory.“It was a Classique, so we had to battle, win challenges and be focussed right to the end. Kylian came off the bench and turn the game, but the whole team put in a lot of effort,” Eric Maxim Choupo-Moting said via club’s official website.I’m very happy to have won my first Classique. In the first half, it was difficult to create chances and I worked for the team. The most important thing is to have won, all together. I’m proud to have played this game and helped the team,” he added.Neymar, BrazilNeymar can win the Ballon d’Or, says Ander Herrera Andrew Smyth – September 13, 2019 An “excited” Ander Herrera believes new Paris Saint-Germain team-mate Neymar is a contender for the Ballon d’Or alongside Kylian Mbappe.“The team needed this win. A great team relies on its leaders and they need to make the difference at key times. I think I can take on that role and I did it today. We have to keep going and stay on the right track. We know that Marseille have a lot of impact at home,” Kylian Mbappé speaking to Canal+ via club’s official website.“Today, they showed they’re a team that plays good football. They had a number of situations where we were in difficulty, they deserve credit, but we were clinical and came away with the win,” he added.last_img read more