UNHRC refuses to stop screening of video

In his letter, President Henczel has observed that “the participation and consultation with the observers of the Human Rights Council, including INGOs, is based on arrangements, including Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) resolution 1996/31 of 25 July 1996, and practices observed by the Commission on Human Rights (rule 7 of the Council‘s Rules of Procedure)”. He further notes that “NGOs in consultative status with ECOSOC have the right to organize side events”, and that “a large number of such meetings take place in the margins of the session and they do not reflect an official position of the Council”. He said this in response to a protest lodged by the Permanent Representative of Sri Lanka to the UN Ambassador Ravinatha Aryasinha last Monday, which was followed up with a meeting on Tuesday. He however adds that “the organizers of side events take full responsibility for the content of their events”.Sri Lanka on Monday lodged a formal protest against the screening of the latest Channel 4 film. In his letter addressed to Ambassador Remigiusz Achilles Henczel, President of the Human Rights Council, Ambassador Aryasinha had obsereved that “Sri Lanka views this film, as well as the timing of its broadcast as part of a cynical, concerted and orchestrated campaign that is strategically driven, and clearly motivated by collateral political considerations”.  (Colombo Gazette) The United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) has refused to stop the screening of the Channel 4 film “No Fire Zone: The Killing Fields of Sri Lanka” organized by Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and FIFDH to be held at the UN premises in Geneva tomorrow.The President of the UN Human Rights Council Ambassador Remigiusz A. Henczel has however observed that allowing the screening of the video in the premises while the UNHRC is meeting in another room will not reflect an official position of the Council. read more

Despite criticisms Govt adequately preparing for oil gas sector Trotman

Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedPresident not “mouthing off” committed to 100% renewable energy by 2025, despite oil find- TrotmanMay 30, 2017In “latest news”Guyana hoping to access WB loan to help build capacity in oil and gas sectorMay 15, 2018In “latest news”UG integral to capacity building of oil, gas sector- TrotmanDecember 31, 2016In “Business” Natural Resources Minister Raphael Trotman is adamant that contrary to the prevailing criticisms that Government is being ill-advised and is, in fact, not adequately preparing Guyana for an oil and gas sector – the Government is watching and learning from other nations.Natural Resources Minister Raphael TrotmanThe Minister was at the time speaking during the opening of a geosciences technology workshop, organised by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), on Monday. According to Trotman, the Government is pursuing technical cooperation engagements like these, which can provide information with a nexus between the technical and the straightforward.He acknowledged the importance of not only considering geological developments, but economic and commercial trends. Given the size of investment needed, Trotman said that understanding the geological occurrences in other oil-producing nations was especially important.“Owing to the dynamic nature of the earth’s surface and the continental crust that we reside on, many structural changes have occurred that have allowed us to draw parallels with other onshore and offshore (oil) basins and to observe the successes and failures as we continue on this journey.”He told the gathering at the Marriott Hotel that just recently a local team attended an oil producers’ conference in Trinidad, where the importance of learning from locations with similar geology and its role in successful exploration were greatly highlighted. “When there is a thorough understanding of geology and how it affects production, we can ensure optimal resource planning, efficient utilisation, and maximum recovery and successes.” ExxonMobil’s Stena Carron harsh environment drill shipTrotman noted that Guyana would have the task of not only preparing legislative and institutional frameworks to efficiently manage the oil and gas sector in Guyana, but to also mentally prepare for the changes that petroleum production would bring. He was also adamant that Government remained committed to its green state development, alongside the oil sector.There has been a flurry of activities in the Stabroek Block, since ExxonMobil’s 2015 oil find in Guyana. In May of that year, Exxon confirmed that more than 295 feet of high-quality oil-bearing sandstone reservoirs was encountered at its Liza 1 exploration well.In late June 2016, Exxon’s drilling results at Liza 2 revealed more than 58 metres of oil-bearing sandstone reservoirs in Upper Cretaceous formations. The well was drilled to 5475 metres at 1692 metres water depth. Drilling results confirmed recoverable resources to be between 800 million and 1.4 billion barrels of oil equivalent. Data from the Liza 2 well test is being assessed.The company had announced that it made its third significant discovery in its drilling explorations offshore Guyana. Its partner, Hess Corporation, had noted that the Liza 3 exploratory well’s net value could be US$6.2 billion based on calculations from the Bank of Montreal (BMO) Capital Markets.Drilling on the Payara well began on November 12, 2016, with initial total depth reached on December 2, 2016. In January of this year, the oil giant had announced it had struck oil in its Payara-1 well, targeting the same type of reservoirs as the well’s Liza counterpart.The Stabroek Block is 6.6 million acres. Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited (Exxon’s subsidiary) is the operator and holds a 45 per cent interest in the Block. Hess Guyana Exploration Ltd holds a 30 per cent interest, and CNOOC Nexen Petroleum Guyana Limited holds a 25 per cent interest.The lesser-known Orinduik oil block has been under the administration of Eco Guyana and British company Tullow, after they signed a 10-year Petroleum Prospecting Licence and Production Sharing Agreement with Government last year. read more