Re-peeling the effects of degradation: low-tech application of orange crop waste shows potential to restore tropical forests

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri Banner image shows the 1997 initial biological survey of the site in northwestern Costa Rica to receive the orange waste treatment. Photo credit: Dan Janzen & Winnie Hallwachs Hemispheric photos of tropical rainforest vegetation plots: the regenerating plot on the left has low woody biomass, with 4 trees species plus bamboo and lianas, whereas the more mature plot on the right has a higher biomass, 9 tree species, and no bamboo. Photo credit: Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The improved soil from the orange mulch led to the growth of larger trees from an enhanced array of tree species: fertilized plots contained 24 species, while just eight tree species remained in the control transects. These trees were larger with three times the wood growth found in the control site.The authors state in their paper, “The effect of the orange peel deposition on edaphic conditions was dramatic and could serve as a reasonable partial explanation for the difference in tree species composition and aboveground biomass between orange waste treatment and control.”A tayra (Eira Barbara), an elusive mammal researchers found in the orange peel-treated regrowing forest. The researchers gathered wildlife data, with an audio recorder, a camera trap, and soil pitfall traps in the treatment and control areas. With too few camera images, too many recorded calls from animals in a nearby forest, and too many unidentifiable beetles and other species, the researchers did not use the data in their analysis. Nevertheless, the numbers and diversity of invertebrates in the traps differed between the treatment and the control areas. Photo credit: Ltshears, CC 3.0Orange is the new GreenSecondary forests support more biodiversity than degraded pastures and shrubland and sequester carbon dioxide, so restoration of degraded forest land is an increasingly common conservation goal.However, the complexity of tropical forests makes their restoration expensive, so there is equally great interest in finding low-cost tools that contribute to regrowth.The authors state in their paper, “Depositing the orange waste on this degraded and abandoned pastureland greatly accelerated the return of tropical forest, as measured by lasting increases in soil nutrient availability, tree biomass, tree species richness, and canopy closure. The clear implication is that deposition of agricultural waste could serve as a tool for effective, low-cost tropical forest restoration, with a particularly important potential role at low-fertility sites.”The work of larvae, fungi, and microbes: the dark nutrient-rich soil resulting from the biodegradation of orange peels approximately 6 months after they were deposited on the degraded old pasture. Photo credit: Dan Janzen & Winnie HallwachsIn an email exchange, Treuer told Mongabay-Wildtech, “We’ve identified a few factors as essential for this sort of initiative: (1) a nutrient-rich anthropogenic waste, (2) suitable biological agents to break down the waste, (3) nearby seed sources and dispersers, and (4) amenable sociopolitical climate.  The first three conditions are probably fairly common in a world where degraded tropical forests are now greater in extent than intact tropical forests.”Regarding the waste from other crops, Treuer added, “We think there’s a wide variety of nutrient-rich crop residues or other agroindustry byproducts that might have a similar result in terms of fertilization and weed suppression. I heard rumor there are already trials underway at a site in Costa Rica using waste coffee cherries.”These agricultural waste streams are both increasingly common and costly to dispose of, suggesting opportunities for low-cost, carbon-sequestering ecological restoration.“We think the next step is definitely carefully controlled trials and experiments with a variety of ag wastes in a variety of degraded land settings,” said Treuer. “We don’t want to give license to the agroindustry to improperly dispose of their wastes willy-nilly, but we certainly want to encourage cautious collaborations between businesses and researchers in heavily degraded lands with nearby seed sources and seed dispersers.”Beetle in Costa Rica. Photo credit: Dirk van der Made CC 3.0In their paper, the authors conclude, “Lower-cost tropical forest restoration methods, particularly those framed as win–win business-protected area partnerships, could dramatically increase the scale of tropical forest restoration activities, thereby providing a variety of societal and ecosystem benefits, including slowing both global biodiversity loss and climate change.”ReferenceTreuer, T. L., Choi, J. J., Janzen, D. H., Hallwachs, W., Peréz‐Aviles, D., Dobson, A. P., … & Wilcove, D. S. (2017). Low‐cost agricultural waste accelerates tropical forest regeneration. Restoration Ecology. Agriculture, Ecological Restoration, Forest Regeneration, low-tech, Restoration, Technology, Tropical Forests, Wildtech The peels and pulp of oranges applied to old degraded pastures as part of a public-private agreement to examine biodegradation of agricultural waste resulted in not only a successful biodegradation, but also dramatic improvements in soil productivity and vegetation cover.Researchers studying the effects of the application found that the area “fertilized” by processed orange peels had richer soil, a more diverse tree community, higher tree biomass, and greater forest canopy closure than an adjacent control area.The researchers suggest that similar initiatives would require: (1) a nutrient-rich anthropogenic waste, (2) suitable biological agents to break down the waste, (3) nearby seed sources and dispersers, and (4) amenable sociopolitical climate, including supportive policy and management.Agroindustrial by-products that are nutrient-rich but expensive to dispose of offer the opportunity for low-cost, scalable, biodiversity-friendly, carbon-sequestering restoration of degraded forests. Researchers have come upon a new low-tech tropical forest restoration strategy, beginning with agricultural waste.They studied the effects on soil and forest health of the purposeful deposition of tons of processed orange peels and pulp on centuries-old rangeland remaining inside Guanacaste National Park in Costa Rica. In their study, published this week in the journal Restoration Ecology, they found three times the number and diversity of forest trees, a 176% greater aboveground woody tree biomass, and a dramatic increase in soil nutrients where the agrowaste had been applied, compared to an adjacent control site.The orange waste had been applied as part of an innovative public-private agreement to consolidate the conservation area and experiment with biodegradation of agricultural waste.The experiment resulted in not only a successful biodegradation, but also dramatic changes in soil productivity and vegetation cover.Aerial imagery of orange peel fertilized treatment area (mosaic of >10 meter trees and dense mats of herbaceous shrubs and vines to right of dirt road) and unfertilized control (rocky expanse of grass with scattered approximately 2 m tall trees to left of dirt road) taken by quadcopter drone in July 2015. Image credit: Tim TreuerA public-private partnership, interruptedThe orange waste had been applied as part of an innovative public-private agreement to consolidate a conservation area and experiment with biodegradation of agricultural waste. In the mid-1990s, Daniel Janzen, a scientist working with the Área de Conservación Guanacaste (Guanacaste Conservation Area, or ACG), offered to take on the waste products of an orange juice company operating near the ACG in return for a donation of the company’s forested lands surrounding the ACG that were not going to be cultivated.The company dumped a trial mass of orange peels and pulp onto an old degraded cattle pasture remaining inside the ACG in which the degraded and compacted soil had been overrun with jaragua (Hyparrhenia rufa), an invasive pasture grass that took over and kept other plant species from regenerating.The initial trial deposition of orange pulp and peels in 1996. Photo credit: Daniel Janzen and Winnie HallwachsThe 18-month trial period resulted in not only a successful biodegradation, but also dramatic changes in soil productivity and replacement of the grasses with native plants. This positive result encouraged the ACG to agree to receive the company’s processed orange residue for 20 years in return for 1,600 ha of intact primary forest.In 1998, the company brought in 1,000 truckloads carrying over 12,000 tons of orange waste and used heavy machinery to spread it over 3 hectares (7 acres) in a layer 0.1-0.5 meters thick. This mass of material weighed 400 kg per square meter and was roughly 1 part organic matter, 4 parts water.Application stopped because of a lawsuit from a competing juice company, and the waste sat without further treatment for 16 years.The experimental site in 1997, approximately 18 months after the test deposition. Photo credit: Daniel Janzen and Winnie HallwachsFast-forward to 2014, and the Princeton University researchers studied and compared changes in soil nutrients, as well as forest biomass, species, and regeneration, in plots that had been “fertilized” (covered) by the orange mulch and adjacent control plots that had regenerated without treatment.They found that the huge deposition of the orange waste had disappeared, decomposed by larvae of several of the area’s fly species and associated fungi and microbes. That biodegradation transformed both soil chemistry and vegetation structure and composition.Replenishing soil nutrients The researchers measured the pH, organic matter, and available concentrations of eight nutrients in soil samples from plots in the control and treatment areas. In an email to Mongabay-Wildtech, lead author Timothy Treuer said, “we were pretty surprised to find that the fertilized area had a more neutral pH than the unfertilized area. This may have been because the orange peels were processed to remove essential oils for use in cleaning solvents.”“The nutrient from the orange waste that disappeared to the greatest extent from the top 10cm of the soil was phosphorous, not leaching-prone potassium,“ said Treuer. “This observation, together with the absence of nitrogen-fixing species from the unfertilized control area suggests the addition of phosphorous may have had an outsize impact on plant growth at the orange peel site.”Fellow author Jonathan Choi hypothesized that, “the addition of nutrients like calcium and potassium were able to shift the overall pH of the system towards one that is less prone to leaching [a major deplete of tropical forest soil nutrients].” Unfortunately, he added, “it is difficult to [confirm] because we lack a time machine to get us back to 1998 to observe the system more closely.”Enabling a more robust, diverse plant community Tropical forests support more tree species than other ecosystems, but what eventually grows back on soils that have been repeatedly burned, compacted, and cultivated is a simplified, depauperate system dominated by a few species resistant to fire and cattle.The 3-hectare treatment area immediately after it was loaded with 1,000 truckloads of orange waste in the late 1990s. Photo credit: Daniel Janzen and Winnie HallwachsThe early anoxic conditions created by spreading the massive orange waste over the initial shrubs and grasses killed their roots, an important step that made the “fertilized” site available for other plants to grow.Treuer told Mongabay-Wildtech, “Fire management has been one of the central tasks of ACG staff over the last three decades in ensuring the continued health of the park. Interestingly, fertilization with orange peels may have added a lot of fire resilience to the system; by suppressing grasses and speeding canopy closure, the orange waste makes the scourge of tropical forest restorationists less of a risk.”The researchers quantified the changes in the vegetation structure and tree community by measuring and identifying trees within three meters of several 100 meter-long line transects within the orange waste treatment area. They did the same within the pasture on the other side of a road that had not been covered in orange peels.They also took hemispheric (“fish-eye”) photographs of the canopy, which “showed significant increases in canopy closure in the area where orange waste was applied relative to control.”last_img read more

Videos unlock secrets of jellyfish as deep-sea killers

first_imgScientists have for the first time captured extensive visual documentation of deep-sea food webs using 27 years’ worth of video observations from remotely operated vehicles run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).The research greatly enhances scientists’ understanding of deep-sea food webs by documenting the importance of soft-bodied predators like jellyfish.Until now, our understanding of food webs in the deep ocean have been limited by what can be captured by net and whose bodies survive a journey to the survey. Video footage of a Gonatus squid feeding on a bathylagid fish. © of MBARIScientists have for the first time captured extensive visual documentation of predation events that underpin deep-sea food webs. The research, which relies on hundreds of video observations captured over nearly three decades by deep-diving remotely operated vehicles run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), reveals the importance of deep-sea jellies in these ecosystems as major predators and sources of sustenance.Until now, our understanding of food webs in the deep ocean have been limited by what species can be captured by net and whose bodies can survive a journey to the surface. That meant soft-bodied, gelatinous animals like jellyfish have been greatly underrepresented using traditional surveying techniques. MBARI’s approach enabled researchers Anela Choy, Steven Haddock, and Bruce Robison to capture deep-sea predators in the act of feeding, offering new insight into predator-prey relationships at depths up to nearly 4,000 meters (13,000 feet) off the California coast.“This direct approach has never been used systematically before,” Robison said in a statement. “Unlike other methods, it involves no guesswork and provides very precise information about who eats whom in the deep sea.”ROV frame grabs of pelagic predators and their prey from Choy et al (2017). (a) Gonatus squid feeding on a bathylagid fish (Bathylagidae). (b) Periphylla periphylla, the helmet jellyfish, feeding on a gonatid squid (Gonatidae), with a small narcomedusa (Aegina sp.) also captured. Images © MBARI; caption adapted from Choy et al (2017).The research, which is published in the December 6th issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, identified 84 different predators and 82 different prey types across almost 750 different video observations of predation events. Soft-bodies animals Ô medusae, ctenophores and siphonophores — consumed the greatest diversity of prey, outpacing cephalopods like squid.“The most surprising thing to me was how important gelatinous animals were as predators, and how their unexpectedly complex food habits spanned the entire food web. Who would have thought that a deep-sea jelly that looks like a big dinner plate would eat 22 different types of animals?” lead author Anela Choy, a MBARI Postdoctoral Fellow, said via a news release. “Our video footage shows that jellies are definitely not the dietary ‘dead ends’ we once thought. As key predators, they could have just as much impact as large fishes and squids in the deep sea!”ROV frame grabs of pelagic predators and their prey from Choy et al (2017). (d) A narcomedusa, Solmissus, ingesting a salp chain (Salpida). (e) The ctenophore Thalassocalyce inconstans, with a euphausiid (Euphausiacea) in its gut. Images © MBARI; caption adapted from Choy et al (2017).ROV frame grabs of pelagic predators and their prey from Choy et al (2017). (c) Images from an undescribed physonect siphonophore known as ‘the galaxy siphonophore’ feeding on a lanternfish of the family Myctophidae. (f) The trachymedusa, Halitrephes maasi, with a large, red mysid (Mysidae) in its gut. Images © MBARI; caption adapted from Choy et al (2017).The findings show that jellies play a critical role in deep-sea ecosystems, added Haddock.“There is a misconception that jellies are merely a nuisance and serve no real purpose in marine ecosystems,” he said in a statement. “Our results and other studies around the world show that they are a common source of food for a diverse group of predators. Interactions involving gelatinous predators and prey create most of the complexity that we see in our new deep-sea food web.”Counts and depth distributions of 718 pelagic feeding observations categorized into nine different broad animal groupings, made by ROVs within the study ecosystem between the years 1991 and 2016. (a) Prey and (b) predator identities and depth distributions illustrate the depth distributions and general animal identities of the feeding interactions presented throughout Choy et al (2017).Citation:Choy, C.A., Haddock, S.H.D. Robison, B.H. (2017). Deep pelagic food web structure as revealed by in situ feeding observations. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 284: 20172116, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2017.2116 (6 December 2017) Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Archive, Deep Sea, Ecology, Fish, Jellyfish, Oceans, Strange, Wildlife center_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

Two new dog-faced bats discovered in Panama and Ecuador

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Bats, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, New Species, Research, Species Discovery, Wildlife Researchers have described two new species of dog-faced bats: the Freeman’s dog-faced bat (Cynomops freemani) from Panama and the Waorani dog-faced bat (Cynomops tonkigui) from Ecuador.The Freeman’s dog-faced bat was named after bat specialist Patricia Freeman.The species name of the Waorani dog-faced bat, “tonkigui,” honors the Waorani tribe of Ecuador that lives near one of the locations where the bats were captured, the study says. For the past few decades, scientists have known of six species of fast-flying, insect-eating bats with dog-like faces — collectively called the dog-faced bats.Now, a group of researchers has described two more species of dog-faced bats in a new study published in Mammalian Biology: the Freeman’s dog-faced bat (Cynomops freemani) from Panama and the Waorani dog-faced bat (Cynomops tonkigui) from Ecuador.Researchers from the Panama-based Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) first came across the Freeman’s dog-faced bat inside abandoned wooden houses in the town of Gamboa in 2012. Over the course of five nights, the team captured 56 bats using specialized mist nets, took their measurements, then released them. They also recorded the bats’ calls and collected one individual that had died.At the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in Washington, D.C, the scientists compared their field observations, including DNA, sound recordings and body measurements of the bats, with existing museum collections from across the Americas and Europe, and confirmed that the bat was new to science. They named it Freeman’s dog-faced bat after Patricia Freeman, a bat specialist currently at the University of Nebraska State Museum of Natural History.“We were very lucky to catch several different individuals of this species in mist nets and to record their calls,” Thomas Sattler, who was one of the team members in Panama at the time of collection, told Smithsonian Insider. “Knowing their species-specific echolocation calls may make it possible to find them again in the future with a bat detector — without catching them—and to find out more about their distribution and habitat preferences.”In fact, some STRI staff recently spotted pregnant females of the species in Gamboa in August 2017, and some young individuals the following month.Thomas Sattler holds two Freeman’s dog-faced bats discovered in Gamboa, Panama. Photo: Elias BaderThe Smithsonian team described the second new species — the slightly smaller Waorani dog-faced bat — from individuals collected by other naturalists and researchers from Ecuador’s rainforests. The team did not have any call recordings of the bats, so they confirmed its status by comparing the bats’ physical measurements and DNA with those of other museum specimens collected in Ecuador.“Identifying two mammal species new to science is extremely exciting,” Ligiane Moras, lead author of the study who did part of this work as a fellow at NMNH, said in a statement.Rachel Page of STRI added: “Molecular tools combined with meticulous morphological measurements are opening new doors to the diversity of this poorly understood group. This discovery begs the question — what other new species are there, right under our very noses? What new diversity is yet to be uncovered?”A Waorani dog-faced bat. Photo by Diego Tirira.The newly described Freeman’s dog-faced bat. Photo by Thomas Sattler.Citation:Moras, L. M., et al. (2017). Uncovering the diversity of dog-faced bats from the genus Cynomops (Chiroptera. Molossidae), with the redescription of C. milleri and the description of two new species. Mammalian Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.mambio.2017.12.005.center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

‘Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise’ film shows how farmers are fighting climate change

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Food, Education, Environment, Extreme Weather, Film, Flooding, Green, Oceans, Overpopulation, Population Article published by Shreya Dasgupta A recent documentary looks at how Bangladeshi farmers are adapting to rising sea levels.The film documents how Bangladeshi farmers are keeping their farms from flooding by building floating gardens made of water hyacinth and bamboo.The film won the Best Short Film at the New York WILD Film Festival, which begins on Feb. 22.Mongabay interviewed cultural anthropologist Alizé Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important. This is a story of hope.Bangladesh is extremely vulnerable to climate change. Threatened by rising sea levels, storms and cyclones, floods have become commonplace, with seawater encroaching both homes and agricultural farms. But Bangladeshi people have found ingenious ways of adapting to the rising sea level. A recent documentary, “Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise,” explores one such example of resilience.To keep their farms from flooding, Bangladeshi farmers have been building floating gardens — farms made of water hyacinth and bamboo that float on water, no matter what the water level. These floating gardens help the people “fish, raise ducks, and grow produce,” Alizé Carrère, a cultural anthropologist and National Geographic explorer, told National Geographic in 2016.“Adaptation Bangladesh,” featuring Carrère and directed by documentary filmmaker Justin DeShields, looks not only at simple floating farms that farmers have traditionally used in flood-prone areas, but also explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries, and even high-tech floating farms that could potentially provide food for entire cities. For Carrère, it was important to document these “slices of hope.”“So while I sometimes wonder if people will criticize these stories as futile or inaccurate portrayals given what’s coming down the pike, I have to remind myself that those small narratives (and practices) of resilience are all that we have left,” she told Mountain film education. “And frankly, most of what we’ve used so far to push people to action on climate change are doomsday narratives, which clearly haven’t been working. So why not try a new, more uplifting narrative and see where it brings us?”“Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise” won the Best Short Film award at the New York WILD Film Festival, held at the Explorers Club in Manhattan, which began Feb. 22 (watch the trailer here).Mongabay interviewed Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important.Buoyant fields made of plants and manure can support crops in Bangladesh. Carrère (at right) toured several with Bangladeshi reporter Tania Rashid. Photo by Katia Nicolova.Mongabay: What makes Bangladesh a good location for a film about climate change and rising sea levels?Alizé Carrère: Bangladesh is one of the most climate vulnerable countries in the world, for a multitude of reasons. To begin with, it’s a giant river delta. Bangladesh sits at the confluence of the Ganges, Jamuna and Meghna rivers, so it’s flat and extremely wet. Any fluctuation in sea level rise or monsoon patterns dramatically impacts the population, many of whom live on or near the water. It’s also the most densely populated country on our planet — more than 160 million people live in a landmass the size of Wisconsin. That’s staggering. When you have that many people living so close together, and when the environment is so susceptible to minor fluctuations in water levels, you end up with a highly vulnerable population. On top of that it is also a very impoverished country, so the alternatives for most people are limited once flooding occurs.How did you come to look at climate adaptation efforts in Bangladesh, and how did the film come about?I actually learned about the floating gardens of Bangladesh in college, when I took a geography course at McGill University. I was fascinated by the concept: if you could build gardens that float, then you’re not beholden to your environment. Regardless of what the water level is, your farm stays afloat, continuing to provide food even during the wettest months of the year (when all fields are under water). I loved this idea, and started finding other examples of resilience and practical design in the face of change. Once I started collecting these stories, it gave rise to the idea of making a series. We started with the case study in Bangladesh.Whereas we normally hear a lot of doom and gloom about climate change, Adaptation Bangladesh seems to strike something of a hopeful note by focusing on the ways farmers are attempting to cope with sea level rise. What are some of the key adaptations you feature in the film?The film looks at four different adaptive designs as it relates to sea level rise and erratic monsoon patterns: traditional floating farms made of extremely simple materials (all organic plants), more advanced floating farms made with recycled materials, floating school boats and libraries, and finally, large-scale, high-tech floating farms out in the ocean that could provide food for entire cities.In your time with them, how hopeful did these farmers seem that they could adapt to climate change and even perhaps continue to thrive in a warming world?That’s a tough question, and I think it changes depending on where you are and who you’re talking to. Bangladeshis have always lived with, on and around water, and therefore constantly adjust to it. To be surrounded by water demands, in some way, that you always stay present. You can’t project too far into the future about the way things will be, because water is incredibly fickle and may be one way today and completely different tomorrow. And when that’s your dominant landscape feature, you get pretty good at, quite literally, going with the flow. From our conversations, and from what I saw, this seemed to be the prevailing attitude. That’s not to say there isn’t suffering and difficulty with that reality, but it’s more of a take-each-day-as-it-comes mentality.Bangladeshi farmers use floating farms to grow food. Photo by Katia Nicolova.These farmers must still be facing significant challenges. Which of those challenges seemed most daunting to you?Population growth. I can’t put into words how intense it is to be immersed in such a densely inhabited area such as Dhaka, the capital city. I had never seen anything like it. You can be the most sustainable population in the world, but when there’s 160 million of you – and the land on which you live is disappearing before your very eyes – it’s not easy. Population growth is something we have to start thinking about more seriously in general, somehow it seems like the climate change conversation has taken over the population conversation in the last two decades. I don’t have the answer to it, but I do think we underestimate the power of educating girls and young women. When they have agency in their own lives, it creates a trickle-down effect and results in healthier decision-making for themselves and their families.There is obvious value in telling these farmers’ stories, but what do you hope this film can achieve in a broader sense? What are the main takeaways for people who maybe don’t live in an area subject to such severe sea level rise?I always say that adaptation is more of a mindset than it is a practice. To me, this project is about waking up the part of ourselves that has allowed us to exist for as long as we have in the first place – and that’s our ability to be resilient and adaptive in our thinking. Most of my work is looking at the positive, but truthfully, the most depressing part is that those of us living in relative comfort and stability are the least adaptable of all! It gets back to the old adage, “necessity is the mother of invention.” There’s something about people who have nothing between them and environmental change that we can all learn from, and my goal with this series is to start bringing those lessons of creativity into classrooms so that young minds can start thinking differently for our future. We will not solve our present-day issues with traditional, linear approaches. I do a lot of work in schools and with educators, and it’s amazing to see how kids absorb this content. They are so much better at it than adults – they have no limits to their imagination, and that’s exactly what we need.What are the distribution plans for the film? When and where can the public see it?We’re still working on that right now, but in the meantime I’m working on putting together a website. Ultimately this project is more than just the series. With the help of an educational consultant, we’re starting to design curriculum around each case study, so that any student, teacher or citizen can go to the site, watch the episodes, and then download educational content if they want to dive deeper into the issues. I’m hoping to have this up by the end of the year.This film is part of a series, correct? What’s coming next?Yes, that’s right. It’s a 6-part series that looks at 6 distinct case studies around the world where we see people innovatively adapting to landscape changes. I’ve been following these different case studies/communities for the last few years now, and will be heading to Vanuatu for the month of May as the next installment. I don’t want to reveal too many details, but it has to do with starfish compost!Large farms made of water hyacinth keep the farms afloat and safe from floods. Photo by Katia Nicolova.The film explores not just traditional floating farms but explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries. Photo by Andy Maser.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Another Rashford double helps Man U beat Arsenal

first_imgMANCHESTER, England (AP):Teenage striker Marcus Rashford continued the dream start to his Manchester United career, scoring two goals and setting up another in a 3-2 win over title-chasing Arsenal in the Premier League yesterday.Only playing because of United’s chronic injury crisis, the 18-year-old Rashford marked his league debut by scoring in the 29th and 32nd minutes to put his team 2-0 ahead – three days after a double in the Europa League against FC Midtjylland on his senior United debut.After former United striker Danny Welbeck replied for Arsenal, Rashford set up Ander Herrera for a shot from the edge of the area that deflected in off Laurent Koscielny.Mesut Ozil made it 3-2 in the 69th, but fifth-place United held on comfortably to move three points off the top four. Arsenal, which put in an off-colour performance against a young and injury-hit United side, dropped five points behind leaders Leicester and haven’t won in the league at Old Trafford since 2006.United manager Louis van Gaal, under much pressure amid the team’s troubles this season, delivered some light relief when he fell to the ground theatrically while remonstrating with the fourth official in the technical area. The Old Trafford crowd roared with laughter and finished the match singing van Gaal’s name, adding to an atmosphere that was buoyant throughout the game as United’s youngsters proved too energetic for Arsenal.SCORING GOALSThat was particularly the case with Rashford, who must think professional soccer is easy. In his first two games as a pro – both of them high-profile ones – in the space of three days, the striker has scored as many goals as Radamel Falcao did in a whole year for United last season.”I could imagine the first game he did that because he is a striker coming in to score goals and the first match is always good,” Van Gaal said. “The second match he has to do what the manager is willing him to do, and he did it fantastically.”Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger was also impressed with Rashford, who hadn’t started a game above under-19 level before Thursday.”The timing and intelligence of his movement was great,” Wenger said. “He could be a very positive surprise for Man United.”Arsenal were flat, strangely, and their passing lacked the usual crispness. But the team managed to reduce the deficit before half-time when Welbeck got behind marker Morgan Schneiderlin at a free kick and headed in Ozil’s cross.Arsenal have 11 games to make up ground on Leicester and is also three points behind second-place Tottenham.”It is still possible,” Wenger said of Arsenal’s title chances, “but the answer will have to come quick and strong.”last_img read more

Innovation legacy of World Cup

first_imgDurban’s Moses Mabhida stadium ishailed as a masterpiece of designand technology. (Image: MediaClubsouthafrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Manola SanchezWBS communications director+27 11 717 3615RELATED ARTICLES • 2010 media hub at Nasrec • New infrastructure for World Cup • Better broadband for Africa • World Cup ticket sales soarJanine ErasmusAlthough the 2010 Fifa World Cup has come to an end, experts say the spirit of it will endure in the sporting achievements and many humanitarian initiatives which have sprung up around it, and the lasting improvements in infrastructure and technology.This is the view of a number of academics and IT specialists, who gathered at the Wits Business School (WBS) in Johannesburg in July to discuss relevant aspects of the World Cup legacy. The meeting was held under the auspices of the WBS Strategic Management of Innovation Seminar Series in conjunction with the Joburg Centre for Software Engineering (JCSE).Titled 2010 Fifa World Cup: What does it mean for South Africa’s innovation and capability building?, the panel featured Nhlanhla Mabaso, the director of Computer and Network Services at Wits; Adrian Schofield, JCSE’s Applied Business Unit manager; Mayan Mathen, CTO of Dimension Data; and Gillian Saunders of specialist advisory company Grant Thornton.Introducing the panel, organisational behaviour specialist Dr Wendy Ngoma, acting WBS head, said that innovation brings out the best in people who care enough to want to change the status quo.Hosting the World Cup called for much of that attitude in order to meet with Fifa’s exacting specifications – but it’s also an approach that will enable South Africa to reap the benefits of its multi-billion-rand investment in years to come.Caribbean-born Prof Gillian Marcelle, head of strategy and innovation at WBS, chaired the panel. She explained that the Strategic Management of Innovation seminar series group meets every two months to discuss ways of getting innovative ideas out to the public. Typical topics include biotechnology, infrastructure and entrepreneurship.“It’s a completely open group and everybody is welcome to join us,” said Marcelle. “You just have to have an interest in innovation.”The experts gave their views on how the World Cup has benefited South Africa in terms of the many improvements in infrastructure and technological systems, and how these improvements could be efficiently used in the future.Maximising opportunities“South Africa has once again demonstrated its ability to pull off the big one,” said Schofield. “Why can’t we achieve this level of success in areas such as education, security, health or job creation? Perhaps the real innovation lies in motivating government processes to achieve these outcomes.”As proof of South Africa’s innovative skills, Schofield mentioned the design of new stadiums and the communications infrastructure that connects the magnificent buildings, Fifa offices, and broadcasters to the impressive International Broadcast Centre (IBC) and IT Control Centre in Johannesburg.“Yes, it was a Fifa requirement, but South Africa put it together,” said Schofield, adding that it was unfortunate that Fifa saw fit to import much of the expertise. “But I hope that our local industry has watched and learned all that it could. For instance, with high-definition and 3D television, we should now be thinking not only of manufacturing the hardware, but of developing suitable content.”The one area where technology failed, said Schofield, was in the ticketing system, the complexity of which was ill-suited to Africa, and was not adapted by Fifa until it was almost too late. “It was a good opportunity for local ticketing companies, but sadly they missed out.”Schofield discussed ways in which all this new technology can be put to good use, but added that it would require some imagination. “The IBC broadband infrastructure cannot be wasted, and it would be a great idea to build a hi-tech campus on that site, once the moveable equipment has been taken away.”Schofield also described the fan park sites as areas with great potential for outdoor entertainment venues and cinemas, or even places where communities can gather to learn more about important government programmes.The stadiums present another challenge, he said. With their cutting-edge technology they should not be limited to hosting just rugby and football matches. “We could turn them into support structures for local schools, using them as giant classrooms or extra sports fields.”This is especially fitting, he said, in light of the fact that one of Fifa’s most publicised legacy goals of the tournament is education.“The stadiums also hold great promise as focal points for surrounding communities, by hosting internet cafes or health clinics, for example. We mustn’t starve ourselves of the opportunities presented to us by the World Cup, but rather, turn them to our maximum advantage.”Cutting-edge technology in stadiumsDimension Data’s Mathen shared a few of the World Cup’s highly specialised IT developments with the audience.“Although for me, one of the greatest legacies was in the social aspect,” he said. “I wasn’t too excited until the opening ceremony, but now I value the opportunity to have met so many new people.”The 415 000 jobs created, the cumulative global audience of around 26.9-billion, the boost to South Africa’s economy – while these are all factors that cannot be ignored, said Mathen, there are other aspects that are equally impressive.“The infrastructure development and upgrades to national roads has changed my life. There have been huge improvements made to roads, airports, stadiums and hotels, as well as our communications capability. Emergency services disaster centres in major cities have been upgraded, which allows for a better coordinated effort when it comes to managing disasters.”In terms of safety and security, said Mathen, the South African Police Service created a dedicated 2010 team of 41 000 members, while the police reservist force is to grow from 45 000 to around 100 000.Other safety and security benefits are less noticeable – yet no less significant. “South Africa’s e-border system is one of only three in the world that works on a cloud computing platform. It constantly scans international databases to keep track of potentially undesirable people as they travel.”Mathen said that eThekwini, or Durban, is now a digital city with one of the world’s top fibre-optic cable networks. “The city can now offer smart connect services to small businesses, and runs more efficiently in general.”The recent broadband developments and newly operational undersea cables have opened up tremendous opportunities. “We have great broadband capability – but entrepreneurs now need to come up with ideas to utilise it.”Mathen also mentioned that during the World Cup, South Africa became one of the highest “tweet” sources in the world, referring to the Twitter social network phenomenon. “We averaged around 750 tweets per second, with some 3 500 going out every second during World Cup matches.”He described Johannesburg’s Soccer City as the largest World Cup stadium ever built. “It has 17-million tons of steel and 11-million bricks – all sourced locally. We have thousands of workers now trained in construction skills.”Turning to the Cape Town stadium, the jewel of the city, Mathen talked about the various systems installed in the showpiece to ensure fans’ safety. “It has a facial recognition surveillance system that can send instant alerts to the police if a wanted individual is spotted on the closed circuit television system. The stadium’s electronic ticketing system and intelligent fire management systems are world class. Even the police vehicles have cutting-edge systems that allow them to travel up to 160 kph while doing facial and number-plate recognition.”The Cape Town stadium is also highly energy efficient, he said, and is run by an intelligent building management system.And the expertise gained by South Africans working on these projects has not been wasted. “As a result of the work done during the World Cup, our people have been consulted by agencies working on future events such as the next Fifa World Cup in Brazil in 2014, and the two upcoming Rugby World Cups.”Protecting bordersDoctoral candidate Mabaso talked about other legacy aspects such as improvements to the border control system developed in 1985, and still used successfully today by border officials.“Although improvements have been made over the years, the system received a big jump for 2010,” he said. The new movement control system was responsible for thwarting the plans of a number of identified hooligans, who tried to enter the country during the World Cup.The country also implemented other innovations such as hand-held passport processing devices at international airports, which can service new arrivals while they’re still standing in the queue. These were piloted in South Africa during the 2009 Fifa Confederations Cup.“Other long-term legacy aspects,” he said, “are the development of sustainable technologies, and a boost in confidence in South Africa both internally and externally. There are one or two more negative aspects such as the possibility of white elephants, but these can be overcome with some imagination.”New visitors to South AfricaGillian Saunders talked about tourism aspects of the World Cup, saying that official data would only be released later in the year, but meanwhile the company had projected just under 400 000 World Cup visitors, using ticket sale figures.“We took the number of ticket sales versus the average number of games a visitor would watch, a figure gleaned from previous tournaments, and came to a result of about 373 000 visitors.”The tourism spend, said Saunders, was up by 0.48% compared to normal July figures, and the GDP would benefit by an additional 1.72% in total.“We also can’t ignore the profiling of South Africa on the world stage, helped by the presence of 18 850 media professionals in the country. We’ve benefited from increased national pride and a new can-do attitude, and we’re also seeing more football development as well as football and rugby integration.”The World Cup, said Saunders, would give South Africa the opportunity to grow its event and leisure tourism sector, as the tournament has given the country access to new markets and new countries.“We’ve also broken new ground in cyberspace. We’re the first World Cup to make extensive use of social media,” she said, adding that for the first time Africa is seen internationally as a place with a realistic growth potential.last_img read more

OCA Young Cattlemen’s Conference provides industry learning experience

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The 2017 Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation Young Cattlemen’s Conference (YCC) hosted 25 cattlemen and women for a 3-day leadership development program in Columbus and the central Ohio areas, Aug. 10-12. The conference was made possible by Farm Credit Mid-America and the Ohio Soybean Council.YCC kicked off Thursday evening at the Legends Lane Reproductive Services in Alexandria with a beef dinner and participants were present for the 2017 Ohio State Fair Commercial Cattle Show carcass contest awards presentation. Guest speaker, Colin Woodall, Senior Vice President, Government Affairs, National Cattlemen’s Association (NCBA), gave attendees a Washington, D.C. policy update on the issues that the industry is facing.Conference attendees also participated in a spokesperson training program by Ryan Goodman, Director of Grassroots Advocacy and Spokesperson Development, NCBA. Goodman lead participants through a media training session that strengthened their communication skills, taught attendees how to tell their beef production story, and become a more effective cattle industry leader.Ohio Beef Council staff led a discussion regarding its role in checkoff collection and beef promotional efforts in Ohio. OCA staff also discussed the value of membership and the role OCA has in legislative and regulatory issues.Participants had the opportunity to have lunch at Cameron Mitchell’s The Pearl restaurant to learn about current checkoff funded beef promotions. Following lunch, participants traveled to the Ohio State House where they met with Representative Brian Hill (District 97). Representative Hill, who chairs the House Agricultural and Rural Development Committee, spoke about current Ohio legislation affecting the beef cattle industry and answered questions from the group.The final day included a session with Dr. Lyda Garcia, Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University Department of Animal Sciences, for a Mini-BEEF 509 class. Dr. Garcia provided hands-on learning on how meat is graded, fabrication of wholesale and retail cuts, and other issues that can affect beef quality and pricing. Participants also viewed champion carcasses from the 2017 Ohio State Fair.A special tour of the Ohio State University Woody Hayes Athletic Center was a highlight of the program thanks to a continuing relationship between OCA and the OSU football team. Participants learned about the history of OSU football and walked through training and practice facilities. YCC participants wrapped up their morning with a state of the beef industry update with John Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator.The purpose of the YCC is to offer emerging Ohio beef industry leaders and young producers the opportunity to build their own leadership skills as they network with beef industry leaders, government officials, businesses and media. Young beef producers interested in attending the 2018 YCC should contact the Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation at 614-873-6736 or email beef@ohiobeef.org.last_img read more

Delano Williams takes Grand Turk to a grand stage at World Games

first_img Recommended for you Related Items:2015 world championship, chris brown, delano williams, lime ambassador Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp The Nation will stand still to watch the country’s first Olympian Delano Williams return home postponed due to weather Team Great Britain’s 4x400m relay team disqualified!! Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 05 Aug 2015 – Delano Williams is the new brand ambassador for LIME Turks and Caicos and this has earned him support for his Delano Williams Foundation, which was last year launched and LIME has established the sprinter, a website at www.DelanoWilliamsTCI.com. The site tells us who Delano is, where the track superstar wants to go with his athletics career, highlights his DW Foundation, features a photo gallery and news page and allows visitors to contact Williams by phone or email. Just recently, Delano Williams was congratulated for making the 2015 World Championships team where he will compete for Team Great Britain. Delano is going into the competition with the third fastest time at 32:14 for the 400m, behind the Bahamas’ Chris Brown.last_img read more

Buy Sell Hold What stocks are analysts tracking on March 8

first_imgIndian pedestrians walk on Dalal Street – Trader’s Street – next to the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) in Mumbai on March 7, 2014.INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty ImagesSGX Nifty, an early indicator of the Nifty 50’s trend in India, signals a weak start for the domestic markets after the benchmark Sensex declined 429 points or 1.27 percent to close at 33,317 on Tuesday.Here are some of the stock recommendations by analysts for Wednesday:1. Aegis LogisticsMotilal Oswal recommends ‘Buy’Target Price: Rs 303Current stock price: Rs 228About the company: Aegis Logistics distributes liquefied petroleum gas and provides logistics and terminalling services in the oil, gas and chemicals sectors. The company also manufactures and distributes oleochemicals and kerosene oil and provides chemical storage facilities.Stock Performance: The stock has jumped 13 percent in an year and has a P/E ratio of 63 times forward earnings. Aegis Logistics has a market capitalization of Rs 76 billion.2. DCB BankIndependent analyst Kunal Bothra recommends ‘Sell’Target Price: Rs 150Current stock price: Rs 157About the company: DCB Bank Limited is a full service commercial bank. The Bank offers consumer banking, commercial banking, and treasury operations.Stock Performance: The stock has edged up 2 percent in an year and has a P/E ratio of 20 times forward earnings. DCB Bank has a market capitalization of Rs 48 billion.3. State Bank of Indiamanasjaiswal.com recommends ‘Sell’Target Price: Rs 240Current stock price: Rs 246About the company: State Bank of India provides a wide range of banking and financial services to corporate, institutional, commercial, agricultural, industrial and individual customers throughout India. The bank also provides international banking to its Indian customers and has operations in other countries.Stock Performance: The stock has lost 9 percent in an year and has a market capitalization of Rs 2.1 trillion.4. Ashok LeylandAngel Broking recommends ‘Buy’Target Price: Rs 163Current stock price: Rs 141About the company: Ashok Leyland manufactures medium and heavy duty commercial vehicles, including buses, tractors, dumpsters, haulage trucks, fire engines, and defense sector vehicles. The Company also manufactures industrial & marine engines, ferrous castings and spare parts for automobiles. Ashok Leyland sells its products in India and abroad.Stock Performance: The stock has gained 57 percent in an year and has a P/E ratio of 26 times forward earnings. Ashok Leyland has a market capitalization of Rs 413 billion.5. Time TechnoplastINDSEC recommends ‘Buy’Target Price: Rs 224Current stock price: Rs 158About the company: Time Technoplast manufactures and sells technology based polymer products for a wide variety of industries.Stock Performance: The stock has gained 60 percent in an year and has a P/E ratio of 23 times forward earnings. Time Technoplast has a market capitalization of Rs 36 billion.Disclaimer: The recommendations provided by the research analysts are their own, and not that of the website or its management.last_img read more

Building Poland

first_imgThe festival not only aims to provide a wholesome insight into Polish culture and art, but also hopes to rouse further interest in the audience so as the association of exchange continues.The festival began with the screening of the documentary film A little  Poland in India  directed by Anu Radha and Sumit Osmand Shaw. A Little Poland in India’ is a first film that has been co-produced between the governments of India and Poland, under the audio-visual agreement between both the countries. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The film is about the time period of  World War II, when about 1,000 Polish children travelled to India.  ‘Our relationship with India stretched back to World War II when India opened her heart to the Polish refugee children and offered them both home and human warmth. We shall never forget the generosity of spirit,’said Piotr Ktodkowski, the Polish ambassador.The film festival will be also screening other films like llumination directed by Krzystof Zanussi, Escape from the Liberty Cinema directed by Wojciech Marczewski, My Father’s Bike  directed by Piotr Trzaskalski and the Promised Land directed by Andrzej Wajda.WHEN: 18 till 23 NovemberWHERE: India Habitat Centre, PVR Select Citywalk (3 December)last_img read more