Mikel Obi Announces Retirement from National Team

first_imgSuper Eagles Captain John Obi Mikel has announced his retirement from the senior national team after after 13 years of service.The 32-year old midfielder who was part of Gernot Rohr’s squad that won the bronze medals of the AFCON 2019 in Egypt for a record eight time announced on Instagram that he was glad ending his career in Egypt where it all began with the senior national team in 2006.“Egypt is a country where I have started and have finished my national career. In 2006, i played my first official Championship for my country. 2019 Africa Cup of Nations marks my last Championship for National Team with Super Eagles, Mikel posted on Instagram Thursday afternoon.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram John Mikel Obi,last_img

As Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem faces multiple threats, local resistance grows

first_imgLand cleared to grow oil palm within the Leuser Ecosystem. Photo by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay-Indonesia. Land cleared to grow corn in the Mount Leuser National Park. Photo by Junaidi Hanafiah/Mongabay-Indonesia. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored 1234567 read more

‘Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise’ film shows how farmers are fighting climate change

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Food, Education, Environment, Extreme Weather, Film, Flooding, Green, Oceans, Overpopulation, Population Article published by Shreya Dasgupta A recent documentary looks at how Bangladeshi farmers are adapting to rising sea levels.The film documents how Bangladeshi farmers are keeping their farms from flooding by building floating gardens made of water hyacinth and bamboo.The film won the Best Short Film at the New York WILD Film Festival, which begins on Feb. 22.Mongabay interviewed cultural anthropologist Alizé Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important. This is a story of hope.Bangladesh is extremely vulnerable to climate change. Threatened by rising sea levels, storms and cyclones, floods have become commonplace, with seawater encroaching both homes and agricultural farms. But Bangladeshi people have found ingenious ways of adapting to the rising sea level. A recent documentary, “Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise,” explores one such example of resilience.To keep their farms from flooding, Bangladeshi farmers have been building floating gardens — farms made of water hyacinth and bamboo that float on water, no matter what the water level. These floating gardens help the people “fish, raise ducks, and grow produce,” Alizé Carrère, a cultural anthropologist and National Geographic explorer, told National Geographic in 2016.“Adaptation Bangladesh,” featuring Carrère and directed by documentary filmmaker Justin DeShields, looks not only at simple floating farms that farmers have traditionally used in flood-prone areas, but also explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries, and even high-tech floating farms that could potentially provide food for entire cities. For Carrère, it was important to document these “slices of hope.”“So while I sometimes wonder if people will criticize these stories as futile or inaccurate portrayals given what’s coming down the pike, I have to remind myself that those small narratives (and practices) of resilience are all that we have left,” she told Mountain film education. “And frankly, most of what we’ve used so far to push people to action on climate change are doomsday narratives, which clearly haven’t been working. So why not try a new, more uplifting narrative and see where it brings us?”“Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise” won the Best Short Film award at the New York WILD Film Festival, held at the Explorers Club in Manhattan, which began Feb. 22 (watch the trailer here).Mongabay interviewed Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important.Buoyant fields made of plants and manure can support crops in Bangladesh. Carrère (at right) toured several with Bangladeshi reporter Tania Rashid. Photo by Katia Nicolova.Mongabay: What makes Bangladesh a good location for a film about climate change and rising sea levels?Alizé Carrère: Bangladesh is one of the most climate vulnerable countries in the world, for a multitude of reasons. To begin with, it’s a giant river delta. Bangladesh sits at the confluence of the Ganges, Jamuna and Meghna rivers, so it’s flat and extremely wet. Any fluctuation in sea level rise or monsoon patterns dramatically impacts the population, many of whom live on or near the water. It’s also the most densely populated country on our planet — more than 160 million people live in a landmass the size of Wisconsin. That’s staggering. When you have that many people living so close together, and when the environment is so susceptible to minor fluctuations in water levels, you end up with a highly vulnerable population. On top of that it is also a very impoverished country, so the alternatives for most people are limited once flooding occurs.How did you come to look at climate adaptation efforts in Bangladesh, and how did the film come about?I actually learned about the floating gardens of Bangladesh in college, when I took a geography course at McGill University. I was fascinated by the concept: if you could build gardens that float, then you’re not beholden to your environment. Regardless of what the water level is, your farm stays afloat, continuing to provide food even during the wettest months of the year (when all fields are under water). I loved this idea, and started finding other examples of resilience and practical design in the face of change. Once I started collecting these stories, it gave rise to the idea of making a series. We started with the case study in Bangladesh.Whereas we normally hear a lot of doom and gloom about climate change, Adaptation Bangladesh seems to strike something of a hopeful note by focusing on the ways farmers are attempting to cope with sea level rise. What are some of the key adaptations you feature in the film?The film looks at four different adaptive designs as it relates to sea level rise and erratic monsoon patterns: traditional floating farms made of extremely simple materials (all organic plants), more advanced floating farms made with recycled materials, floating school boats and libraries, and finally, large-scale, high-tech floating farms out in the ocean that could provide food for entire cities.In your time with them, how hopeful did these farmers seem that they could adapt to climate change and even perhaps continue to thrive in a warming world?That’s a tough question, and I think it changes depending on where you are and who you’re talking to. Bangladeshis have always lived with, on and around water, and therefore constantly adjust to it. To be surrounded by water demands, in some way, that you always stay present. You can’t project too far into the future about the way things will be, because water is incredibly fickle and may be one way today and completely different tomorrow. And when that’s your dominant landscape feature, you get pretty good at, quite literally, going with the flow. From our conversations, and from what I saw, this seemed to be the prevailing attitude. That’s not to say there isn’t suffering and difficulty with that reality, but it’s more of a take-each-day-as-it-comes mentality.Bangladeshi farmers use floating farms to grow food. Photo by Katia Nicolova.These farmers must still be facing significant challenges. Which of those challenges seemed most daunting to you?Population growth. I can’t put into words how intense it is to be immersed in such a densely inhabited area such as Dhaka, the capital city. I had never seen anything like it. You can be the most sustainable population in the world, but when there’s 160 million of you – and the land on which you live is disappearing before your very eyes – it’s not easy. Population growth is something we have to start thinking about more seriously in general, somehow it seems like the climate change conversation has taken over the population conversation in the last two decades. I don’t have the answer to it, but I do think we underestimate the power of educating girls and young women. When they have agency in their own lives, it creates a trickle-down effect and results in healthier decision-making for themselves and their families.There is obvious value in telling these farmers’ stories, but what do you hope this film can achieve in a broader sense? What are the main takeaways for people who maybe don’t live in an area subject to such severe sea level rise?I always say that adaptation is more of a mindset than it is a practice. To me, this project is about waking up the part of ourselves that has allowed us to exist for as long as we have in the first place – and that’s our ability to be resilient and adaptive in our thinking. Most of my work is looking at the positive, but truthfully, the most depressing part is that those of us living in relative comfort and stability are the least adaptable of all! It gets back to the old adage, “necessity is the mother of invention.” There’s something about people who have nothing between them and environmental change that we can all learn from, and my goal with this series is to start bringing those lessons of creativity into classrooms so that young minds can start thinking differently for our future. We will not solve our present-day issues with traditional, linear approaches. I do a lot of work in schools and with educators, and it’s amazing to see how kids absorb this content. They are so much better at it than adults – they have no limits to their imagination, and that’s exactly what we need.What are the distribution plans for the film? When and where can the public see it?We’re still working on that right now, but in the meantime I’m working on putting together a website. Ultimately this project is more than just the series. With the help of an educational consultant, we’re starting to design curriculum around each case study, so that any student, teacher or citizen can go to the site, watch the episodes, and then download educational content if they want to dive deeper into the issues. I’m hoping to have this up by the end of the year.This film is part of a series, correct? What’s coming next?Yes, that’s right. It’s a 6-part series that looks at 6 distinct case studies around the world where we see people innovatively adapting to landscape changes. I’ve been following these different case studies/communities for the last few years now, and will be heading to Vanuatu for the month of May as the next installment. I don’t want to reveal too many details, but it has to do with starfish compost!Large farms made of water hyacinth keep the farms afloat and safe from floods. Photo by Katia Nicolova.The film explores not just traditional floating farms but explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries. Photo by Andy Maser.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Cerrado: appreciation grows for Brazil’s savannah, even as it vanishes

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer The Brazilian Cerrado – a vast savannah – once covered two million square kilometers (772,204 square miles), an area bigger than Great Britain, France and Germany combined, stretching to the east and south of the Amazon.Long undervalued by scientists and environmental activists, researchers are today realizing that the Cerrado is incredibly biodiverse. The biome supports more than 10,000 plant species, over 900 bird and 300 mammal species.The Cerrado’s deep-rooted plants and its soils also sequester huge amounts of carbon, making the region’s preservation key to curbing climate change, and to reducing Brazil’s deforestation and CO2 emissions to help meet its Paris carbon reduction pledge.Agribusiness – hampered by Brazilian laws in the Amazon – has moved into the Cerrado in a big way. More than half of the biome’s native vegetation has already disappeared, as soy and cattle production rapidly replace habitat. This series explores the dynamics of change convulsing the region. A view of the Cerrado savannah and plateau tablelands. Photo by Alicia PragerThis is the first of six stories in a series by journalists Alicia Prager and Flávia Milhorance who travelled to the Cerrado in February for Mongabay to assess the impacts of agribusiness on the region’s environment and people. View a Cerrado series overview video here.We bounce down a potholed red sand road that cuts through a seemingly impenetrable green thicket that rises up on either side. It’s the wet season in Western Bahia state, Brazil, and the Cerrado blossoms.The long undervalued vastness through which we drive is the most biodiverse savannah in the world: 5 percent of the planet’s animals and plants are native to this biome. More than 10,000 plant species, over 900 different birds and 300 types of mammals live here. Scientists also recently learned that the region’s deep growing grasses, shrubs and trees, along with soils, play an outsized role in storing large amounts of carbon – a hedge against global warming.The Cerrado, as big as it is today, is much diminished. It once covered two million square kilometers (772,204 square miles); an area bigger than Great Britain, France and Germany combined; more than 20 percent of Brazil’s territory; stretching out to the east and south of the Amazon. Today less than half remains in a natural state, and a mere 7.5 percent has been officially protected.Standing in the shadow of its internationally renowned brother, the Amazon, the biome is deeply threatened. Deforestation happens at a faster pace in the Cerrado than in the Amazon, with most of this rapid landscape conversion driven by cattle ranching and soy production.The Cerrado is the country’s latest industrial agribusiness frontier, and its legal protections remain weak. However, in recent years local and national voices began calling for this forgotten biome’s protection – an outcry that has now been heard and magnified by environmental scientists and activists around the world.Mongabay contributors Alicia Prager and Flávia Milhorance on assignment for Mongabay, drive over a river in the Cerrado, February 2018. Photo by Flávia MilhoranceA jaguarundi* caught on camera as it crosses a dirt road. Photo by Natália Machado / Federal University of GoiásIn October 2017, twenty-three global companies – mostly supermarkets and fast food chains – signed the Cerrado Manifesto, a call for action to stop deforestation there. Within three months that nearly tripled to 61 co-signers. The cause gained further attention at this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos.In addition, a national campaign to conserve the Cerrado (“No Cerrado, no water, no life”) is gaining momentum. Today, the initiative’s 43 participating organizations, including the NGOs ActionAid and Rede Social, and the government’s Federal Public Ministry (MPF), are pushing the Brazilian government, the United Nations, World Bank and other institutions, for better surveillance of the ongoing environmental harm, and of impacts on traditional and indigenous people living there.“This campaign is a result of the increasing awareness of the Cerrado’s importance. It seeks a [form of] development that is less predatory to the people and the environment,” said Gerardo Cerdas Vega, from Action Aid, which has published a report documenting the impacts of deforestation by agribusiness on the Cerrado.A giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus). Photo by Fernando Trujillo / IUCNForest losses in the Cerrado biome, 2000 to 2014. Please click the map for the interactive version. Credit: Willie Shubert  / Map for EnvironmentMore than 100 threatened species What was it that finally brought the spotlight of world attention to the Brazilian savannah?First off, it was the biome’s rich biodiversity and its rapid diminishment. Nearly half of the 10,000+ plant species that grow there are unique to the region. But a further reduction of the Cerrado due to farming would likely lead to an irreversible mass species extinction, researchers warn. At least 137 animal species are currently endangered in the biome, estimates Mariella Superina, from the IUCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources which maintains the global Red List of threatened species.Take the giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus), for instance. It is listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN, is very susceptible to land use change, and struggling to adapt as the Cerrado’s native grass, shrubs and trees are converted to farmland. There’s no exact species count, but according to Superina, the population has decreased significantly. Current estimates put its density at less than four giant armadillos per 100 square kilometres (39 square miles). That, along with worsening habitat fragmentation, reduces the chances P. maximus will find a mate. The species’ food supply is also threatened, as expanding agribusiness uses insecticides to wipe out the bugs on which the insect-eating armadillos thrive. (Brazil uses more pesticides than any other nation on earth, and soy production is especially pesticide intensive.)Another iconic Cerrado species is the northern tiger cat (Leopardus tigrinus), a small feline weighing on average about 2.4 kilograms (5.3 pounds). It is especially in danger because most of its range lies within the unprotected parts of the Cerrado, and so is highly affected by the conversion of habitat to farmland. L. tigrinus occupies widely dispersed territories, so faces a similar difficulty to the giant armadillo, as it tries to locate mates across a fragmented landscape. The IUCN Red List describes the northern tiger cat as Vulnerable, but researchers expect a further sharp decrease in coming years.A northern tiger cat (Leopardus Tigrinus). Photo credit: miguel vanegas on Visual Hunt / CC BY-NC-SAA pair of burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia). Photo by Nathália Machado / Federal University of Goiás“A forest upside down”The public imagination tends to see savannahs as dull. But a few hours drive across the Cerrado reveals a richness of habitats. The region’s vegetation – scattered across more than two million square kilometers – takes many different shapes. The lowlands boast stretches of woodland covered with mid-to-large sized trees with gnarled branches. Climbing into the chapadões, as the Cerrado’s plateaus are called, grasses and shrubs take over. Patches of crooked low-growing trees are sparsely scattered between rocky outcrops. The plateau savannah is the primary target of agribusiness, as these lands are easiest to deforest; flat and easier to plow, plant, and harvest with large tractors; and receive more rain.The Cerrado has two main seasons: wet and dry. Annual severe droughts, lasting from April to September, lead to recurrent spontaneous bushfires. Flora and fauna, faced with these harsh conditions, were required long ago to evolve traits assuring resilience and adaptation to precipitation extremes. Add to this the exchange of species between the neighboring Amazon and Atlantic Rainforest, which allowed the Cerrado to develop over the eons into a robust and very diverse biome, concludes a U.S. study published in the PNAS journal.Above ground, trees evolved a thick and corky bark to guard themselves from flames and to ensure quick recovery. Some even benefit from regular wildfires, which clear space in the habitat and stimulate seed release. Additionally, long roots are needed to tap deep-down water sources in the dry season. A typical Cerrado tree is the pau-terra (Qualea grandiflora), whose taproots allow it to access deep soil layers that remain moist even after months without rain.“The Cerrado is a forest upside down,” explains Rafael Loyola, a professor at the Federal University of Goiás. This largely invisible but exuberant underground ecology has not only caused people to underappreciate it, but also makes the habitat more difficult to restore once disturbed. “Simply planting a bunch of trees does not bring the Cerrado back,” he says.A typical view of the savannah landscape. Photo by Flávia MilhoranceA rufous-tailed jacamar (Galbula ruficauda). Photo by Nathália Machado / Federal University of GoiásThe wholesale replacement of Cerrado trees with pastures and crops might also be changing the regional hydrological cycle, which could further hinder the restoration of native ecosystems, says Marcelo Simon, with the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA). Recent research shows that forest conversion to agriculture may be deepening Brazil’s droughts, to the detriment of trees and other native plantlife.A constant companion on drives through the Cerrado is the buriti (Mauritia flexuosa), a large fan palm which overlooks the forest or frames the iconic veredas, as Brazilians call the frequent clearings created by grasslands and wetlands. Traditional inhabitants use the buriti for a wide array of purposes: they produce medicine from it, eat the vitamin A-rich fruit, press the plant to produce oil, and use the palm leaves as rainproof roofing. The buriti isn’t the only plant used by traditional communities, who also value the many fruits produced by the Cerrado. Amongst the most popular are the pequi (Caryocar brasiliense) and the araticum-do-cerrado (Annona crassiflora), also called marolo or cascudo.Local people depend on these fruits for variety in their diets, and so did we. No matter how behind schedule we were, or who was guiding us around the countryside of Western Bahia, they always found time for a quick roadside stop to pick fruit – to eat or to show to us. A locals’ trained eyes could quickly spot the ripest pequi or araticum-do-cerrado from afar.Many of these fruits remain unknown to the majority of Brazilians, but are essential for maintaining Cerrado residents’ intimate relationship with nature. Full bags of rounded yellow pequis exuded a strong fruity aroma in our car all during our trip. The peels are as thick as the bark of trees and require great patience if you wish to penetrate these delicious gems – maybe that’s a metaphor and lesson that needs to be applied to this savannah by Brazil and the world.Buriti fruit. Photo by Flávia MilhoranceJoelma de Souza Santos displays guava fruits. Among the most popular local fruits are the pequi (Caryocar brasiliense) and the araticum-do-cerrado (Annona crassiflora), also called marolo or cascudo. Photo by Alicia PragerBirthplace of watersThe Cerrado’s magnificent biological diversity provides just one reason for saving it. Researchers also stress the importance of the region as a vast, crucial Brazilian watershed.Located in the center of the country and composed of many plateaus, the biome aids the distribution of water to other parts of the nation. It feeds eight of 12 water basins in Brazil, among those the Amazon, Paraguay and São Francisco rivers, plus three aquifers: Guarani, Bambuí and Urucuia.”But the removal of native vegetation reduces the resilience of the ecosystem and its capacity to store and deliver that water”, says Bernardo Strassburg, founder of the International Institute for Sustainability in Rio de Janeiro.There’s another critically important reason to protect the biome – a reason that concerns more than the people of Brazil. Deforestation accounts for a high percentage of Brazil’s greenhouse gas emissions, but the deep-growing vegetation of the Cerrado stores huge amounts of carbon. However, as agribusiness converts savannah to soy fields and cow pastures, that carbon storage capacity is diminishing.The maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) is among 60 IUCN listed Vulnerable Cerrado animal species. Other Red List Cerrado mammals include the Cerrado fox (Lycalopex vetulus), giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), jaguar (Panthera onca), the Tapir (Tapirus terrestres) marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus), and pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus). Photo by Náthalia Machado / Federal University of GoiásWaterfalls flow down from the Cerrado’s plateaus to feed Brazil’s rivers. Photo by Flávia MilhoranceAccording to a report by Chain Reaction Research, a U.S. research institute, the Cerrado biome’s deforestation between 2013 and 2015 (when 1.9 million hectares, or 7,335 square miles were cleared), accounted for 29 percent of Brazil’s carbon emissions over that period.Unfortunately for a world desperate to curb greenhouse gas releases, Brazilian law could allow the further removal of up to 80 percent of the Cerrado’s native vegetation. Should this intense deforestation be allowed to reach its legal limits, another 385 million tons of CO2 could be released into the atmosphere, according to research by the Conservation Biogeography Lab at Brazil’s Federal University of Goiás.Scientists who now understand that the Cerrado has a crucial role to play in carbon storage, are urging that the government pass tougher laws conserving the savannah.But the biome could be in serious trouble, even without the continued conversion of forests by agribusiness. Climate change is taking its toll too, causing more severe dry seasons. Rainfall is predicted to decrease by 10 to 20 percent by 2040, says EMBRAPA’s Simon. Other studies predict more frequent wildfires due to deepening drought, which could threaten native species and carbon storage.A black-tufted marmoset (Callithrix penicillata), a forest canopy species. Photo by Donald Hobern, Flickr CCStrategically “empty”Historically, official documents and political speeches long declared the Cerrado to be an empty space sitting in the middle of Brazil, says Clóvis Caribé, a researcher from the Federal University of Bahia. “This argument was used by the government and corporations to take the development plan further following the economic dynamics, but disregarding indigenous groups and traditional communities that lived there for long.”Migration to this “empty” central region first intensified in the 1960s, with the construction of the nation’s capital, Brasília. It intensified again a decade later, as agricultural expansion and infrastructure projects came to the biome. Today, more than 25 million people live in the Cerrado, 15 percent of Brazil’s people.For many decades, the Cerrado’s poor-soil savannah was compared unfavorably with the biodiversity-rich Amazon and Atlantic Rainforest, Simon explains. As a result, many in government and industry saw the biome as a sacrifice zone, to be surrendered to agribusiness and Brazilian economic progress. As a result, even as efforts grew to save the Amazon, few such efforts bloomed in the Cerrado. Fortunately, that’s changing.At last we turned off a bumpy dirt road onto asphalt. Big trucks transporting commodities sped past us on their way to Brazilian coastal ports where their cargoes would be transferred to oceangoing ships for export. Beside the pavement, a seemingly never-ending soy field stretched in every direction to the horizon. Meanwhile, as we drove on, and as you read this, Brazil’s agricultural frontier continues expanding, and the Cerrado biome continues to shrink.*Correction: The photo of the jaguarundi was originally misidentified as a puma; thanks goes to our readers for catching the error.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.A late afternoon view of the Cerrado savannah. Photo by Flávia Milhorancecenter_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, carbon, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Carbon Sequestration, Carnivores, Cats, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Controversial, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Drought, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Extinction, Featured, Forest Carbon, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fragmentation, Forest Loss, Forests, Global Warming, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Impact Of Climate Change, Industrial Agriculture, Land Use Change, Law, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Pasture, Ranching, Regulations, Research, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation, Wildlife last_img read more

Debates heat up as Indonesian palm oil moratorium is about to be signed

first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong Banner image: Orangutans in Borneo have been seriously threatened by the oil palm industry. Photo by Rhett A. Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Announced two years ago, a moratorium on new oil palm permits in Indonesia is about to be signed by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo.But a coalition of environmental NGOs has criticized the latest draft of the moratorium, saying it contains many loopholes.The coalition has submitted a list of recommendations to the government, which has promised to follow up on their concerns. JAKARTA — Two years after he announced a freeze on new oil palm plantation permits, President Joko Widodo of Indonesia finally appears to be on the verge of putting it into effect, ahead of regional elections set to take place this June. But some distance remains between the administration and a coalition of environmental NGOs observing its deliberations, with the latter arguing the moratorium should remain in place for much longer than is being proposed.The draft of the document enshrining the permit freeze, seen by Mongabay, stipulates it will be enacted for no more than three years. It also mandates a review of existing licenses, since many are known to have been issued in violation of procedures, and a review of those now in the process of issuance.The document is being prepared in the form of a presidential instruction, which is not legally binding, a concern long aired by NGOs pushing for tough enforcement. It was signed by Darmin Nasution, the coordinating minister for the economy, on Dec. 22, after which it underwent some revision by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry before returning to Darmin’s desk. It now awaits approval from the president.In the current draft, implementation of the policy would be overseen by a task force established by Darmin’s office. The task force would verify data related to all outstanding oil palm permits, and then provide recommendations to the relevant ministries on how to follow up. This may include rezoning an area as forest, which would be off-limits for oil palm cultivation; revoking a permit; or pursuing criminal charges against law-breaking companies.President Jokowi, as he is popularly known, declared the moratorium in the wake of the 2015 fire and haze crisis, which pumped more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than the entire EU economy during the same period. The underlying cause of the disaster was the large-scale drainage of Indonesia’s vast peat swamp zones, mainly by huge conglomerates planting cash crops like oil palm and acacia to feed global markets. Indonesia’s countryside is blanketed in leases belonging to these firms, as well as to companies in the mining and logging sectors.Since shortly after the 1998 fall of the dictator Suharto, when sweeping authority over land and resources was shifted from Jakarta to district governments, control over licensing for plantations has rested largely in the hands of district chiefs, known as bupati. Many of the permits they have issued are known to be linked to corruption, often for the purpose of financing an election campaign. The permits come down on lands covered in rainforest and rich in wildlife, or claimed by indigenous communities, giving rise to intractable social conflicts as companies operate with impunity, and fueling Indonesia’s sky-high greenhouse gas emissions.Spurred on by the nation’s anti-corruption commission, known as the KPK, Indonesia’s law enforcement agencies are already bracing themselves for an expected uptick in corruption ahead of the upcoming regional elections. The licensing freeze, said Rabin Ibnu Zainail, director of the NGO Pilar Nusantara South Sumatra, must be an integral part of this effort. “The moratorium will prevent incumbents from selling permits,” he told Mongabay.An online petition started a month ago by the NGO Auriga Nusantara asks the president to tell bupatis to stop not only “selling” permits but also extending them in the periods immediately preceding and following an election, when candidates either need money for their campaign, or are in hock to businesspeople who helped them win. The petition is also addressed to Indonesia’s governors and to Ignasius Johan, the minister of energy and mines.The lack of any formal legalization of Jokowi’s permit moratorium was brought into sharp relief last month, when the website ForestHints, a media platform through which forestry ministry officials often release information to the public, quoted one of the ministry’s directors-general as saying that four new permits had been issued to palm oil companies in Indonesia’s easternmost Papua region.The website referred to “high-density forest cover which dominates” the four concessions, and said one them belonged to the Ganda Group. It did not say who owned the other three. The director-general, Sigit Hardwinarto, declined to name the companies when reached for comment by Mongabay, although he stressed the need to protect Papua’s rainforests.At present, the nation’s palm oil sector is rife with illegality. In Riau, the main palm oil-producing province on the island of Sumatra, there are 18,000 square kilometers (6,950 square miles) of illegal oil palm plantations with no proper permits — an area two-thirds the size of Massachusetts — leading to an estimated loss of 34 trillion rupiah ($2.47 billion) of potential state income from tax, Suhardiman Ambi, head of the provincial parliament’s licensing monitoring committee, told news portal Detik.In Central Kalimantan province, on the island of Borneo, only 85 out of 300 oil palm companies have valid permits with “clean and clear” status, meaning they comply with basic laws regarding environmental impact assessments, payment of taxes and royalties, and proper registration of concession boundaries and corporate information, according to the NGO Forest Watch Indonesia (FWI).And there is also a problem of oil palm permits overlapping with permits for other industries, such as mining and timber. FWI estimates there are at least 46,900 square kilometers (18,110 square miles) of concessions with overlapping permits in Indonesia.When Jokowi announced the moratorium on oil palm permits back in 2016, he also mentioned that he would impose a moratorium on coal mining permits. However, the current draft of the moratorium doesn’t address coal permits, and it’s not clear when or if such a freeze will be implemented.Oil palm in Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Time to assessTwelve NGOs voiced their concerns during a meeting with the Presidential Staff Office, an institution established by Jokowi to oversee his priority development programs, at the end of February.Representatives from the NGOs submitted a list of 11 recommendations to the office. Among them is a call to extend the period of the moratorium beyond the planned three-year maximum.“What’s clear is that there should be no more new permits for three years,” Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar told reporters recently in Jakarta.She said she believed three years was sufficient time for the government to review all permits and take necessary actions.“I said that two years was actually enough, because we’re just reviewing,” Siti said. “But to give more time, then three years is alright.”The coalition of NGOs, though, say the moratorium period should not be limited to three years, but instead should remain in effect until it achieves its goals.“The implementation of this moratorium should be based on criteria and indicator of a certain achievement, not based on a period of time,” the NGOs said in their list of recommendations. “So it’s important for the government to design and announce a mechanism to verify its achievements, priority areas and to ensure the results are open for public.”Zenzi Suhadi, the head of research and environmental law at Indonesia’s main environmental watchdog, Walhi, said the moratorium should be in effect for at least 25 years in order to give the industry room to breathe. He said it was also necessary to give the government time to evaluate the industry and its economic value compared to other industries.“During that time, the government could evaluate whether palm oil benefits the country or not,” Zenzi told Mongabay. “With a [plantation] permit lasting for 30 years, the 25-year period will allow the government [sufficient time] to evaluate the industry.”A baby orangutan in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Along with habitat loss due to mining, orangutans in both Sumatra and Borneo are threatened by fires and deforestation for oil palm and pulp plantations. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Law enforcement questionsThe NGOs also say the draft moratorium is weak in its law-enforcement aspect, with the bulk of that role relegated to the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, and no mention of roles for other law enforcers such as the police or the Attorney General’s Office.That makes it unclear whether the task force will feature any law enforcement representatives, according to Indonesian Center for Environmental Law (ICEL) executive director Henri Subagiyo.“The composition of the task force is not clear,” he said in an interview during a recent event in Jakarta.Teguh Surya, executive director of the environmental NGO Yayasan Madani Berkelanjutan, who also attended the meeting, said it was unlikely the environment ministry alone could handle all law enforcement aspects required in the palm oil industry.“If we see the ministry’s budget, it’s very small,” he said in an interview. “Frankly, the government’s attention toward law enforcement is still weak. Meanwhile, law enforcement is the spearhead of the improvement in the management of forests and plantations.”The NGOs say they are worried that with weak law enforcement, there will be little to no follow-up on the permit review process.“How can the Ministry of Environment and Forestry solve the 1.8 million hectares of illegal plantations?” Henri said. “The plantations in Riau are not occupied by only one or two people, but by thousands of people. What do we do with them? How can we solve this problem without cracking down on the masterminds behind these illegal plantations?”The NGOs are pushing for law enforcers, particularly the KPK, to be involved in examining the illegal plantations, seeing how the KPK has already instigated a massive effort to review the legality of thousands of licenses held by palm oil companies across the country.The KPK also conducted a study on the palm oil industry in 2016 and found there were weaknesses in the permit-issuing mechanism, monitoring and management of the sector.“We’re hoping that the government will strengthen its cooperation with the KPK in implementing this moratorium, especially to follow up on the KPK’s study,” the NGOs said.Deforestation for an oil palm plantation. Habitat loss due to agribusiness expansion is devastating orangutan populations. No one knows how much damage it is doing to orangutan culture. Photo by Rhett A. Butler‘Legalizing the illegal’Another contentious point is the mandate for the government to enforce a policy requiring palm oil firms to allocate 20 percent of their concessions for local farmers.The draft moratorium stipulates that the Ministry of Agriculture must evaluate companies to see whether are complying with the regulation, while the National Land Agency has to speed up the issuance of land permits for local farmers.Henri said there was still debate surrounding the implementation of the policy, such as the question of whether the 20 percent comprises land outside the concessions, and whether that figure is counted from the total size of the lease or the size of the cultivated area only. He called on the government to make the calculation clear before the moratorium is enforced.Lastly, activists criticized a point in the draft that exempts concessions in forest areas that have been planted and have had their forest conversion permits processed by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.The exemption is a carryover from a government regulation signed by Jokowi in late 2015 about changes in the status and function of forest areas. Article 51 of the regulation stipulates that companies that have already obtained permits from local governments in production forest areas can still apply for a license to convert the status of the area from forest to non-forested area within a year of the regulation being issued.If the local permits are issued for areas with protected or conservation status, then the companies are still allowed to operate for a full harvest season.The draft moratorium states that oil palm concessions that have been planted and processed in accordance with the 2015 regulation are exempt from the moratorium, something that activists deem an attempt to legalize something that is illegal.“This exemption causes the moratorium to be useless because there are many illegal oil palm plantations in forest areas,” the coalition of NGOs said.Responding to the recommendations, the presidential chief of staff, Moeldoko, said he would study them first, while emphasizing that the moratorium aimed to increase productivity without clearing new lands.Moeldoko, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, said he would discuss the draft moratorium with related ministries to follow up on the NGOs’ recommendations.“The Presidential Staff Office will study the 11 recommendations and will ensure to push the direction of oil palm development on increasing productivity sustainably, not through new land clearing,” he said in a press statement published on the office’s website. Borneo Orangutan, Corruption, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Indonesia, Oil Palm, Orangutans, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more