Meet Indonesia’s new honeyeater species from Rote Island

first_imgA new bird species from Indonesia has been described by a group of scientists after it was first observed in 1990, a paper said.The bird, which belongs to the honeyeater family, has been named after Indonesia’s first lady, Iriana Joko Widodo, as a way to promote the protection of the species.The researchers said the newly described species’ population was primarily threatened by deforestation to clear land for residential and agricultural use. Scientists have described a new species of bird found only on the island of Rote in eastern Indonesia — but already the population of the honey-eating fowl is threatened by habitat loss as a result of rapid deforestation.The discovery of Myzomela irianawidodoae — named after Indonesia’s first lady, Iriana Joko Widodo — involved a series of separate field studies between 1990 and 2015 by different groups of researchers, according to a paper published Dec. 31, 2017, in the scientific journal Treubia.The first observation of a Myzomela species on Rote in East Nusa Tenggara province — one of the many islands that comprise the Lesser Sunda Islands — was carried out by the Australian ornithologist Ron Johnstone in 1990.Scientists have discovered a new bird species that lives only on Rote Island in eastern Indonesia. Photo courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.The survey, however, was too brief for visual or audio recordings to be taken, and subsequent scientific publications referred to the bird species on Rote as being similar to one on Sumba, an island in the same chain about 230 kilometers (143 miles) to the west.Nearly 20 years later, two Belgian ornithologists visited Rote for a different project in which they photographed extensively and made a long series of sound recordings of the birds they encountered there.“Considering the fact that Sumba and Rote have a distinct biogeographical history — they were never connected to each other — it would appear unlikely that the Rote bird would be the same species as on Sumba,” Philippe Verbelen, one of the two Belgian researchers, told Mongabay in an email.“This suspicion was further strengthened when we realized how strong the vocal differences were between the song of the Rote and the Sumba myzomela,” he added.That led the Belgian scientists to conduct another field study in 2014, during which they performed a bioacoustic analysis comparing the responses of Sumba myzomelas and Rote myzomelas to playback recordings of the birds.The result, Verbelen said, was that the song of male Rote myzomelas failed to trigger territorial reactions from male Sumba myzomelas, and vice versa. Meanwhile, playback experiments on both Sumba and Rote triggered strong territorial reactions when recordings of the territorial song of  a male myzomela from the same island (playback of Rote recordings on Rote; playback of Sumba recordings on Sumba) were used.“The territorial song of Myzomelas has a strong biological function. Those reactions are a strong indicator that the Myzomelas from Sumba and Rote are indeed different species,” the researchers said in a statement.The final confirmation of a new bird species was made by scientists from the National University of Singapore and the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) who went to Rote in December 2015 to capture four specimens of the bird.The team made another bioacoustic analysis, and also compared the animals’ body structure with other species in the Myzomela genus, such as the Buru myzomela (Myzomela wakoloensis), the Seram myzomela (Myzomela elisabethae), the Banda myzomela (Myzomela boiei), the Sulawesi myzomela (Myzomela chloroptera), the Sumba myzomela (Myzomela dammermani), the Timor myzomela (Myzomela vulnerata), and the red-headed myzomela (Myzomela erythrocephala).“The Rote Myzomela is closely related to other species of honeyeater that occur on surrounding Indonesian islands, but it has a unique song which differentiates it from all its relatives,” the statement said. They also noted several subtle and previously overlooked differences in shape and plumage, including a narrower black breast band than the Sumba birds.The honeyeater, Rote myzomela (Myzomela irianawidodoae), was named after Indonesia’s current First Lady Iriana Joko Widodo, as a way to promote the protection of the species which is threatened primarily by habitat loss due to deforestation. Photo courtesy of Philippe Verbelen.The newly described bird typically inhabits the tropical woodlands on Rote, the researchers said. However, they also noted that most of the island, which is only 1,226 square kilometers (473 square miles) in size, smaller than Phoenix, Arizona, had been heavily deforested and developed for residential and agricultural use to accommodate a growing population.“[Rote] does not have a major terrestrial protected area despite the fact that it has several endemic bird species as well as other birds with a highly restricted range — only shared with Timor and Semau [islands] for example — and certain species that are highly threatened throughout their range, such as the olive-shouldered parrot, the yellow-crested cockatoo and the Timor green pigeon,” Verbelen said.In Indonesia, members of the genus Myzomela, including the Rote myzomela, are protected under the country’s 1990 conservation law and a 1999 government regulation on wildlife. The researchers hope that naming the new species after the wife of President Joko Widodo will do even more to promote the protection of the bird.“The fact that this bird was named after Indonesia’s first lady generated big media attention. I believe and hope this can help the general cause of forest conservation and biodiversity protection in Indonesia. It is badly needed considering the rates of forest destruction in Indonesia,” Verbelen said.Due to these threats, the team has also suggested that the species be categorized by the IUCN as “Vulnerable,” and that follow-up surveys be made to describe the population size of the Rote myzomela.“If the Rote myzomela were to vanish from Rote, I’d expect that other unique bird species such as the Rote boobook that strongly depends on good quality forests and big trees would go extinct, too,” Verbelen said.“The world becomes a poorer place each time we are losing a species. In general, it is important to halt biodiversity loss and prevent any species from going extinct,” he added.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Environment, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Land Use Change, New Discovery, New Species, Species Discovery, Tropical Deforestation, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

New sloth book features amazing photographs and busts myths [PHOTOS]

first_imgSloths have gained in popularity in recent years but some misconceptions about them remain, such as their being ‘lazy,’ which is not true. Rather, it’s increasingly clear that sloths are quite active and incredibly stealthy.A new book by an award-winning wildlife photographer and a world expert on sloths aims to raise awareness of facts like this, and raise funds for their conservation.Sloths in fact sleep just 8-10 hours a day, and are otherwise quite active. And when they swim, they can move quite quickly.Mongabay interviewed the authors and shares here several of the stunning images printed in the book. Photographer Suzi Eszterhas was working on a story in Costa Rica when she met sloth researcher Dr. Rebecca Cliffe for the first time. The pair spent weeks in the field together, as she says below, following a mother three-toed sloth and her tiny baby. Some days the pair spent hours lying on the forest floor, just staring up at the mother sloth, “hundreds of feet up in a tree. But other days she came down low to feed, and even crawled across the forest floor in front of us…presenting the most incredible photo opportunities.”Incredible images were indeed the result. Another outcome was that during all that time spent sloth-watching, the photographer and sloth expert decided to publish a book meant to raise awareness and support for the species’ conservation. The result is a fantastic new book, “Sloths: Life in the slow lane,” and the pair discussed it with Mongabay recently.Brown-throated three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus) newborn (less than 1 week old) clinging to mother, Aviarios Sloth Sanctuary, Costa Rica. Twig in background digitally removed. Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.INTERVIEW WITH REBECCA CLIFFE AND SUZI ESZTERHASErik Hoffner for Mongabay: Why do we all seem to love sloths? Rebecca Cliffe: Sloths are evolutionary oddballs. We are often led to believe that the most successful animals are those which are the fiercest, fastest or the most intelligent, yet [sloths] have managed to hang around for over 64 million years, making them one of the most ancient species of mammals, by basically doing nothing. As adults, the slow movement and eccentric biology combined with a permanent, enigmatic smile make them intriguingly weird, while baby sloths are cute enough to melt even the coldest of hearts. I think it is this combination of strange and adorable that has resulted in the soaring global popularity of sloths.In terms of conservation, however, increased popularity does not equal increased protection. Sloths are being poached for tourist photo opportunities (‘sloth selfies’) and for the pet trade in massive numbers, and the rainforest is being degraded as more people travel to countries that [have] sloths. With only one baby every 4 years, and a 60% mortality rate in infant sloths, a slow rate of reproduction means that populations are now in rapid decline. This has a knock-on effect for the entire rainforest ecosystem, as sloths are key recyclers of nutrients, and represent a main prey species for many birds of prey (including the harpy eagle) and big cats (jaguars, ocelots and margays). If you take sloths out of the rainforest, everything else suffers as a consequence.Hoffmann’s two-toed sloths (Choloepus hoffmanni). Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.Mongabay: Sloth species range in conservation status from ‘critically endangered’ to ‘vulnerable’ and even ‘of least concern’ in some cases. Do you have a favorite species, and what’s its status?Rebecca Cliffe: I am fascinated by all sloths, but as a biologist I think my preference probably lies with the Bradypus family. This group takes the sloth lifestyle to the extreme a little more – they have a slower metabolism, slower rate of digestion, slower movement, more specific diet, and they are still very poorly understood, as they do not survive well in captivity. Within this family I have worked mostly with the brown-throated sloths that are currently listed as ‘least concern,’ however I believe this is likely due to a lack of population data. There are no accurate population estimates for sloths as they are so difficult to observe in the wild, but based on numbers being admitted to rescue centers, populations are almost certainly in decline.Suzi Eszterhas: Definitely the Bradypus family for me too. As a photographer, I find their perma-grin look particularly endearing. They are also easier to photograph than their more nocturnal two-fingered cousins. As far as a specific species in the Bradypus family, I can’t pick one. They are all absolutely charming!Male brown-throated three-toed sloth, (Bradypus variegatus), Aviarios Sloth Sanctuary, Costa Rica (captive: rescued and in rehabilitation program). Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.Mongabay: How did a sloth expert and a renowned wildlife photographer come together for this book project?Suzi Eszterhas: I first met Rebecca while working on a sloth story in Costa Rica. She was working on her PhD at the time and we spent weeks in the field together, following a mother three-toed sloth and her tiny, two-week-old baby. Some days we spent hours lying on the forest floor, staring up at a small patch of the mother’s fur, barely visible, hundreds of feet up in a tree. But other days she came down low to feed, and even crawled across the forest floor in front of us, with her tiny baby clinging to her chest – presenting the most incredible photo opportunities.During our days slogging through the jungle and laying on that muddy forest floor, Rebecca regaled me with fascinating information about the life of these mysterious animals. Her passion for sloths was contagious. And her quirky, hilarious personality was incredibly entertaining. We quickly became friends and hatched a plan to photograph sloths throughout Central and South America.Mongabay: The book is packed with great images of sloths and also shares new science. Can you talk about something Mongabay readers may not yet know about sloth behavior or ecology that’s in there?Rebecca Cliffe: The main message I wanted to get across with this book is to dispel the long-held notion that sloths are simple, lazy creatures that do little other than sleep all day. As we learn more about these animals through research, it is becoming apparent that their slow movement is in fact a deliberate and incredibly successful survival strategy. Rather than lazy, sloths are incredibly stealthy – so stealthy that they have fooled even the most eagle-eyed scientists for many decades. Throughout the book we explore this theory and present a new view of sloths that might be surprising to a lot of people.Rebecca Cliffe measuring the arm of adult male brown-throated three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus), Aviarios Sloth Sanctuary, Costa Rica. Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.Mongabay: OK, so ‘slothful’ is a misnomer, and rather than being lazy, sloths keep to a slow pace for strategic reasons. And while individuals in captivity may sleep most of the day, in nature, aren’t they much more active? Rebecca Cliffe: Sloths in nature aren’t lazy at all, but they are certainly slow. While they only sleep between 8 to 10 hours per day – and I know many humans who sleep more than that – they move slowly for the rest of the time and split activity randomly throughout the day and night. All of this works as a survival strategy, as their predators do not identify slow moving things, and cannot predict at what time of day the sloths will be vulnerable. The only time sloths do manage to pick up a bit of speed – other than when they fall out of a tree – which happens an astonishing amount – is when they find themselves in water. This can be to cross a river or – in the case of the pygmy sloths – when they need to swim through the ocean that surrounds their island home. Sloths are entirely buoyant thanks to their oversized, gassy stomachs, and so a sloth in water can float along three times faster than it can move on the ground!Mongabay: So Suzi, how did you manage to get the incredible images of sloths swimming?Suzi Eszterhas: It took five days for me to get this shot. And yes, I did take it underwater by swimming with the sloth. There are a few wildlife experiences in my life that stand above the rest, and this is definitely one of them. Swimming with this sloth was a magical, intimate encounter that rivals experiences I have had sitting with mountain gorillas and floating with humpback whales. This career is a great privilege.Pygmy three-toed sloth (Bradypus pygmaeus) swimming among mangrove forest, Isla Escudo de Veraguas, Panama. Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.Mongabay: What are the main conservation challenges faced by sloths?Rebecca Cliffe: Sloths are the ultimate creatures of habit, which means that they cannot adapt to the quickly changing modern world. They are not physically able to jump across gaps in the canopy as a monkey might, so they heavily depend on continuous rainforest in order to move from tree to tree. Unfortunately, the sloths’ remaining habitat is becoming more and more disturbed. Roads, farms, towns and cities now dominate the landscape, cutting the once continuous forest into smaller and more isolated segments. This is forcing sloths to descend to the ground where they become incredibly vulnerable. All over Central and South America sloths are being hit by cars, attacked by dogs, electrocuted on power lines, and poached for the pet trade. As if this isn’t enough, they are also now facing the problems of inbreeding as sloth populations are becoming isolated due to habitat fragmentation. The only way forward is to promote education, protect the remaining forest and work to connect the fragmented forests with canopy bridges and natural corridors.Four-month-old pygmy three-toed sloth (Bradypus pygmaeus), Isla Escudo de Veraguas, Panama. Photo by Suzi Eszterhas.Mongabay: What do you hope the book will achieve and change in the world? Suzi Eszterhas: As the photographer, it is my hope that the images in this book will give people a glimpse into the life of these incredibly mysterious creatures. I hope that by seeing their beauty and vulnerability, readers will feel compelled to do something to help protect sloths from deforestation and other threats they face. The Sloth Conservation Foundation is the world’s only organization with the mission to conserve sloths in the wild and I am immensely proud that our book is helping to raise funds for their programs.Rebecca Cliffe: I hope this book will help to change the perception of sloths away from the lazy stereotype that they have been plagued with for centuries. To instill a sense of admiration and intrigue about these animals is the only way that people will feel inspired to join us in the battle to save the worlds slowest mammal! Proceeds from the sale of this book are going directly towards supporting the work of the Sloth Conservation Foundation, a registered non-profit organization that is working to protect sloths in the wild. More information about our sloth conservation efforts and ways in which you can get involved can be found on our website, slothconservation.com.Dr. Rebecca Cliffe is a British zoologist, a leading authority on sloths, and the founder and executive director of the Sloth Conservation Foundation. Suzi Eszterhas is an award-winning wildlife photographer best known for her work documenting newborn animals and family life in the wild.  Her photographs have been published in over 100 magazine cover and feature stories. Suzi has sixteen books in print with another four in progress. Biodiversity, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Illegal Trade, Interviews, Photography, Rainforests, Sloths, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Erik Hoffnerlast_img read more

Most Popular Stories from Mongabay Latam, April 2 – 8

first_imgThese are the most popular stories at Mongabay Latam from April 2 – 8. The oil spill in Colombia is an ongoing environmental disaster. The search for the causes of the tragedy and the work to save affected animals were the most read stories of the week.The image above, a spectacular vista of the Grand Canyon in Colorado from the vast Mongabay Latam archive, was the most popular on Latam’s social networks.Oil spill in Colombia: the environmental emergency continues and the causes are unknownThe crude oil spill extends for 24 km in the La Lizama and Caño Muerto tributaries in western Colombia. Image credit: Journalists for Peace Foundation.A mysterious, month-long oil spill is finally under control, but the effect of more than an estimated 16,000 barrels of crude oil are still being felt, notably in a tributary of Colombia’s most important river, the Magdalena . While the country’s state oil company, Ecopetrol, waits for the arrival of US equipment to determine why an abandoned oil well suddenly exploded, a troubling hypothesis points to pressures from a new hydroelectric dam.Bolivia: Why is the Sama Reserve in danger?The Tajzara basin in the Sama Reserve. Image credit: National Service of Protected Areas (Bolivia).Overgrazing, highway construction and intense, prolonged droughts are wreaking significant impact on the fragile ecosystem of the Sama plateau. Water is the most affected resource, despite the reserve’s status as a protected area and an internationally important wetland. A nearby city could lose its primary source of water.Colombia: Supreme Court orders government to stop deforestation in the AmazonGuaviare, where rainforests border the Amazon and Orinoco rivers, is one of five provinces with the highest deforestation rates in Colombia. Image credit: Semana.A historic environmental decision. Given the increasing deforestation of the Amazon, the supreme court granted the petition of 25 children and youth who argued that the loss of the forests will affect their futures. The state will need to take concrete measures.Sounds of biodiversity: acoustic monitoring in scientific researchModern recorders (Audio moth) are getting smaller and easier to hide in trees. Image credit: Marconi Campos, Sieve Analytics.For the last ten years, the sounds of the dry savannah of Puerto Rico have been recorded without interruption. Learn how sound helps to monitor the region’s biodiversity.Saving animals affected by the oil spill in ColombiaSnakes need to be both cleaned and documented. Image credit: Cabildo Verde.Colombia’s state oil company Ecopetrol reported that the recent 16,000-barrel oil spill has killed 2442 animals. Meanwhile, 1530 have been rescued. How are the Colombians dealing with this environmental disaster? How are they saving the affected animals?Peru: marine conservation versus oil activity?Sound waves produced by seismic testing affect marine life. Image credit: Mario Gomi, OceanaDiverse specialists and experts warn of the environmental risks posed by oil wells in the north of the Peruvian sea, a marine zone of high biodiversity and sensitivity.Read Mongabay Latam’s daily reporting in Spanish here, one can also sign up for the weekly email newsletter or follow on social media via @mongabaylatam. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Oil Spills, Rainforests center_img Article published by Maria Salazarlast_img read more

Durban’s 2022 Games bid highlighted in Glasgow

first_img22 July 2014South African delegates made an impassioned plea for Durban to be named host of the 2022 Games at the Commonwealth Games Federation’s general assembly in Glasgow, Scotland on Monday.The South African coastal city is up against Edmonton, Canada for the honour, which will be decided at a vote to be conducted in Auckland, New Zealand in September 2015.The South African delegation included Sport Minister Fikile Mbalula, South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (Sascoc) president Gideon Sam, Sascoc CEO Tubby Reddy, and Vuzi Mazibuko, head of sport for the City of Durban.‘It’s Africa’s turn’They addressed the gathering and presented a slick video which featured former South African President Nelson Mandela and concluded with the message: “It’s Africa’s turn to host its sons and dauhters for the first time on home soil, in the city where Nelson Mandela chose to cast his first vote. Let Durban be the first African city to host the Commonwealth Games.”The South African delegation focused on the country’s proven record in hosting major sports events, including the Fifa World Cup, ICC Cricket World Cup and IRB Rugby World Cup.Sport was also touted as a powerful tool of unification in the country.National Development Plan“We’ve gone through the fire to get here, and the [National Development Plan] requires sport to make the contribution to build South Africa into the giant on the continent of Africa,” Sam said in his address.“We’re bold enough to say that South Africa can host any event. We’ve shown that to the United Nations and the International Olympic Committee. We can say it is Africa’s turn.”‘Infrastructure and capacity’Reddy told the general assembly: “We’ve shown that we have the investment, infrastructure and capacity to deliver world-class events. It’s our turn, but … we don’t want you to give it to us because it’s our turn. We will do a quality job,” Reddy promised.Mbalula said the South African government was fully behind Durban’s bid. “We guarantee the government will play its part in hosting the most successful sporting event in South Africa,” he said.“The Commonwealth Games to us are important Games in terms of what we seek to achieve collectively over the years. It’s our turn as the African continent.“If you give [the Games] to Africa, we guarantee you our 102 percent commitment in making it successful. Do it for Africa,” he concluded.Edmonton addressEdmonton took a more low-key approach to its address, with Commonwealth Games Canada president Andrew Pipe telling the delegates that it was not the time to make the bid.“You have a lot of time between now and next year and we have a lot of time to tell you about our bid,” The Edmonton Sun quoted him as saying.“The time now is for Glasgow. From my perspective, the most important thing I can do is introduce you to the person who will be leading the Edmonton 2022 Commonwealth Games bid,” he said, before introducing Canadian city’s only speaker, Chairman Reg Milley.“We’re in Glasgow to listen. We’re here to learn,” Milley said.last_img read more

CBI probe if J&K wants it, says Union Minister

first_imgUnion minister Jitendra Singh said on Tuesday that the Centre had no objection to the handing over of the Kathua rape and murder case to the CBI if the state government referred it.“As far as we are concerned, we don’t have any problem or objection to hand over the case to the CBI. If the state government comes out with a reference, we will hand over the case to the agency today itself,” Mr. Singh told reporters on the sidelines of a function in Jammu.He added that the court was another option through which the case could go to the CBI. “As per my knowledge, a petition (for a CBI probe) is pending there,” he said.Mr. Singh is a member of Parliament from Udhampur in Jammu region and is also the in charge of the ministry of personnel, the controlling authority for CBI.On Tuesday, Chowdhary Lal Singh, one of the two BJP ministers who resigned last week, took out a rally at several places in Kathua to demand a CBI probe into the incident.The case was handed over to the J&K Crime Branch on January 22. The victim went missing on January 10; a week later her body was found in a forest near her house.The girl was allegedly confined in a devasthan (temple), sedated and raped thrice before being suffocated and bludgeoned to death. Eight persons, including a juvenile, were arrested in connection with the crime and their trial began in a court on Monday, where they pleaded not guilty and sought a narco analysis test.Many people in Kathua, including the families of the accused, have been demanding a CBI probe into the incident, which was, however, rejected by Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti last month after the two BJP ministers, Lal Singh and Chander Prakash Ganga, met her and raised the demand.last_img read more

Rawat allays fears of body blow to adventure tourism

first_imgChief Minister Trivendra Singh Rawat assured tour operators of Uttarakhand on Saturday of protecting their interests even as all District Magistrates were asked to implement a High Court-imposed ban on water sports in the State in their respective areas.“All aspects of the High Court order regarding the ban on adventure tourism activities are being studied. The next step will be taken after that. The interests of entrepreneurs associated with the trade will be protected,” he said in a statement here.Mr. Rawat also directed Tourism Secretary Dilip Jawalkar to look into all legal options available in the case and take appropriate action.He said effective steps were being taken by the State government to promote adventure tourism, “which is crucial to tourism in Uttarakhand.”Keeping in view the interests of the people involved in the trade, the Chief Minister said the ‘Uttarakhand Rafting, Kayaking Manual’ has been framed, adding that manuals for paragliding and other adventure tourism activities would be prepared soon.Comprehensive policyHe said a comprehensive policy would be prepared to further promote the industry so that it strengthened the economy of the State.Mr. Jawalkar wrote to all DMs on Saturday asking them to strictly implement the High Court order.The Uttarakhand High Court had on June 18 put a ban on white water river rafting, other water sports and paragliding across the State till a transparent policy was framed by the State government on adventure sports, giving the latter two weeks’ time for the purpose.Devendra Rawat, former president of Rafting Association of Uttarakhand, said the ban would affect 40,000 people associated with the trade.A total of 281 companies are associated with the rafting trade, which together own 600 rafts and transact business worth over ₹20 crore every season. The season lasts nine months from October to June, he said.With the ban coming at the peak of the season, there will be heavy losses, he said.Vaibhav Kala, director, Aquaterra Adventures, said majority of outfits cannot be penalised for the errors of a few. Mr. Kala said the State needs to weed out outfits that do not meet the global benchmark.last_img read more

Anthony, Jackson gone, but Knicks’ losing likely to continue

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. NBA: Derrick Rose ‘fine’ with veteran’s ‘bargain’ salary with Cavs Read Next Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH New York Knicks Jarrett Jack, right, reacts during the second half of a preseason NBA basketball game against Houston Rockets at Madison Square Garden in New York, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki)NEW YORK — Carmelo Anthony is gone. Phil Jackson is gone.The losing appears here to stay.ADVERTISEMENT Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games The New York Knicks have entered a rebuilding mode, with new president Steve Mills and general manager Scott Perry touting the team’s youth even before they had traded Anthony on the eve of training camp.The young players might be ready to win in a couple years, but for now, it looks like another long season inside Madison Square Garden.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“The whole talk for us is it’s a start for us to instill a culture of playing as hard as you can, trying to play together as a team,” coach Jeff Hornacek said. “We don’t necessarily have these superstars that have been in the league for many years carrying our team. We’ve got to do it collectively.”That will fall on players such as Kristaps Porzingis, Tim Hardaway Jr., Willy Hernangomez, rookie Frank Ntilikina and center Enes Kanter, who was acquired from Oklahoma City in the trade for Anthony. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LATEST STORIES Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary The Jackson-Anthony drama hung over the Knicks last season and into the summer, with the team president making it clear he wanted to move on from the All-Star forward. But before he could, the Knicks moved on from Jackson, who couldn’t build a playoff roster in his three seasons. Mills was promoted and he has taken aim at cleaning up the mess within the organization.“Part of my job is to try to add some sense of calmness to what had been a little bit of a crazy environment that we’ve been going through,” Mills said. “So I think that we have a good group of people here.”But it’s a group that looks incapable of defending, and it will be hard to outscore its ineptitude on that end without the 40 points per game the Knicks lost when they traded Anthony and let Derrick Rose leave.So they could be even worse than last season’s 31-51 finish, but at least some of the dysfunction could begone. Fans seemed fed up with it under Jackson, so maybe they’ll accept a team that loses quietly if they see growth on the court without the circus off it.“They want to see effort, they want to see tenacity, they want to see hard work and they just want to see us not backing down from anybody,” Hardaway said. “The icing on the cake is winning ballgames. That’s what we want to do and that’s our goal, to win ballgames, and win as many as possible to see ourselves looking towards the end of the season where we can find ourselves in the postseason.”ADVERTISEMENT Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Some things to watch with the Knicks:KRISTAPS’ KNICKS: Porzingis left frustrated, blowing off his exit interview before returning to Latvia for the summer. The third-year forward came back as the face of the franchise, returning to New York the day Anthony left for Oklahoma City.FRANK FROM FRANCE: Jackson’s last big move was drafting the 19-year-old Ntilikina with the No. 8 pick. It’s hard to tell yet what the Knicks have in the French point guard, who missed summer league with an injury and then most of preseason when he was hurt again.HARDAWAY’S HERE: Mills’ first big move was to give Hardaway a $71-million deal to return to New York after Jackson traded the former first-round pick to Atlanta two years earlier. His game grew with the Hawks, and the Knicks believe he’s ready for a bigger role now.SPEED IT UP: Jackson’s triangle system is mostly gone, with Hornacek saying the Knicks want to open up the offense more in hopes of getting more easy shots.JOAKIM’S JOB: Joakim Noah’s forgettable first season of a $72-million deal ended with him serving a suspension for violating the anti-drug policy. It continues into this season and it’s unclear where he fits after that in a center rotation that also includes Kanter, Hernangomez, Kyle O’Quinn and sometimes Porzingis. MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

Former Lady Eagles saddened by Ateneo-Bundit drama

first_imgThe former UAAP Best Setter gave nod to the contributions of the Thai coach to her career, saying that she wouldn’t be able to get to the level she’ isnow in if not for the hard practices Bundit subjected the Lady Eagles to.“I wouldn’t be where I am today if he didn’t coach us,” she said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutMichelle Morente also acknowledged multi-titled mentor’s huge part in helping her become one of the best opposite spikers in college today.“When I heard the news, I was saddened because we spent a lot of years together and I learned a lot from him,” she said. “I’m so thankful to him because I know I improved a lot as a player. I got my physical and mental toughness from him.” For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion LATEST STORIES Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Middle blocker Aerieal Patnongon, meanwhile, will always be grateful for Bundit for helping them reaching greater heights, especially with their breakthrough title in 2014.“Coach Tai gave me one of my most memorable moments in college which is to be a part of Ateneo’s history as we won the school’s first women’s volleyball championship. Though we had a love-hate relationship, I still loved and respected him despite all the pains we had to endure during training, some of which even made me cry,” she said.With Bundit at the helm, Ateneo was able to go to four Finals appearances and win the UAAP titles in Seasons 76 and 77.He has reportedly been at odds with the current group of Lady Eagles, with the main issue stemming from the bench tactician’s hard practices.Ateneo president Fr. Jett Villarin, SJ had already stepped in to find a resolution to both parties, with the amiable priest saying that Bundit is still the team’s coach.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Coach Lue says Cavs’ losses ‘unacceptable’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMembers of Ateneo’s back-to-back women’s volleyball champion teams couldn’t help but feel sad following the reported rift between coach Tai Bundit and the current Lady Eagles.“Of course, it’s sad because he really gave a lot for the school,” said setter Jia Morado.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

2004 NATIONAL 18’S STORIES ARCHIVED

first_imgAll stories and results from the 2004 National 18’s Championships held recently in Coffs Harbour, have now been archived. These stories can now be viewed using the following link: NATIONAL 18’S STORIES AND RESULTS and click on 2004 They can also be viewed using the ‘News Archive’ link on the ATA homepage: NATIONAL 18’S STORIES AND RESULTS NEWS ARCHIVE (all stories will be found under September 2004)last_img

SeatoSky Gondola in British Columbia likely out of commission until 2020

first_imgSQUAMISH, B.C. — The operators of the Sea-to-Sky Gondola say the popular tourist attraction near Squamish, B.C., likely won’t reopen until early next spring.In a message on the company’s Facebook page, they say the cleanup has started and it’s hoped the gondola can reopen in early 2020, but that depends on the delivery of a replacement cable and new cabins from Europe.When the attraction does restart, the post says it will feature a brand new haul rope and a completely new line of 30 cabins.No one was hurt last Saturday when the RCMP say someone deliberately cut the gondola’s main cable, sending all of the cars crashing to the ground.The company has said the damage will reach into the millions of dollars.The Sea to Sky Gondola officially opened in 2014 and carries between 1,500 and 3,000 people who visit the gondola every day during the summer season, with each cabin holding up to eight people. When in operation, it takes around 10 minutes to reach an elevation of 885 metres above Howe Sound.The Canadian Presslast_img read more