How small is too small? The uncertain fate of Madagascar’s forest fragments

first_imgMany of the largest trees in the protected area didn’t recover after being scorched by a fire in 2014. Photo by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.Sohisika trees, represented by roughly 200 to 300 mature plants all told, are considered to be at high risk for extinction. Ankafobe holds just 15 of them, protected since 2005 as the centerpiece of the 150 hectare community reserve The reserve is supported by the Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG) and is now in the process of achieving legal designation as a New Protected Area.The other sohisikas are scattered on the savannah surrounding the reserve and in a handful of green slivers that mark the clefts between neighboring hills — areas with no environmental protection and that face the constant threat of brush fires during the dry season. Until 2014, another 50 of the trees could be found a few miles away at a site managed by the Antananarivo-based group Madagasco Environnement. But recent satellite imagery shows that the valley where the sohisika were concentrated is now mostly bare.As logging, charcoal production, and the clearing of woods for farmland took their cumulative toll on Madagascar’s forests in the second half of the 20th century, the country’s total forest cover fell by 40 percent. But fragmentation of the forests that remained progressed even more quickly. Between 1950 and 2000, there was an 80 percent reduction in the area covered by “core forests,” which lie at least one kilometer from the nearest edge, a trend mirrored in forests around the world.The result has been a splintering of remaining habitat for endangered species across Madagascar, and a scramble among conservationists to figure out how best to protect what’s left.Map courtesy of Google Maps.“The tragedy of Madagascar is that the forest there is in pieces,” said Stuart Pimm, an expert on the biology of fragmentation and extinction who teaches at Duke University in North Carolina. “When it comes to fragmentation, there’s bad news, there’s worse news, and there’s worse news still.”As the size of a given patch of forest dwindles, Pimm explained, its basic geometry changes too, so that there is much more “edge,” or perimeter, for each hectare of forest. It’s similar to what happens when a child cuts a single sheet of paper into a paper snowflake. These multiplying forest edges make it easier for predators to reach their prey under the canopy, expose trees more readily to the effects of drought, and give brush fires purchase in forests they wouldn’t otherwise burn. Madagascar’s total forest cover fell by 40 percent in the second half of the 20th century, but fragmentation of the forests that remained progressed even more quickly.Conservation groups are working to conserve a number of small fragments. In Ankafobe, the local community has come together to reconnect three scraps of forest and defend them against fire.The risk that both animates this work and threatens to make it obsolete is that fire, agriculture, or other pressures could reduce the size of these fragments below some basic threshold of ecological viability.This is the third story in Mongabay’s multi-part series “Conservation in Madagascar.” ANKAFOBE, Madagascar — When he first told colleagues at the Missouri Botanical Garden that lemurs still lived in the forest in Ankafobe, Jean Jacques Rasolofonirina said he was met with disbelief. “The forest is too small,” he recalled one saying—just 27.76 hectares, to be exact, split into three fragments scarcely larger than three or four New York City blocks.But these narrow wooded valleys still hold three species of lemurs, and owls, frogs, and bats besides. Solofo, as friends and colleagues call him, rattled off their Latin names as he walked down the narrow path that enters the forest from the main road. He stopped to mimic the call of a Malagasy paradise flycatcher (Terpsiphone mutata) perched on a nearby branch, and pointed out seedlings planted to fill in a small clearing beside a stream.After a few minutes, he gestured at a gnarled, windswept tree at the edge of the woods with smooth gray bark and small, waxy leaves. “That,” Solofo said, “is the sohisika,” or Schizolaena tampoketsana, one of a handful of plant species found nowhere on the planet outside the rolling grasslands here, in a single district northwest of Madagascar’s capital city, Antananarivo.last_img read more

So long, UNESCO! What does U.S. withdrawal mean for the environment?

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Adaptation To Climate Change, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Climate Science, Conservation, Conservation And Poverty, conservation players, Controversial, Drinking Water, Earth Science, Ecology, Ecosystems, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Extinction, Featured, Foreign Aid, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Globalization, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Health, Indigenous Cultures, Mangroves, Mining, Oceans, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Protected Areas, Public Health, Rainforest Conservation, Sustainability, Water Crisis, Water Scarcity, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Since 2011, the U.S. has refused to pay its agreed to share to UNESCO as a Member Nation who has participated in and benefited from the organization’s scientific, environmental and sustainability programs. Now, President Trump has announced U.S. withdrawal from UNESCO, effective at the end of 2018.Experts say the pullout won’t in fact do any major damage to the organization, with most of the harm done to UNESCO when the U.S. went into arrears starting in 2011, with unpaid dues now totaling roughly $550 million. However, America’s failure to participate could hurt millions of Americans.UNESCO science initiatives are international and deal multilaterally with a variety of environmental issues ranging from basic earth science, climate change, freshwater, oceans, mining, and international interrelationships between indigenous, rural and urban communities.Among the most famous of UNESCO science programs are the Man and the Biosphere Programme and the World Network of Biosphere Reserves, now including 669 sites in 120 countries, including the United States. Saint Mary Lake and Wildgoose Island, Glacier National Park, USA, a UNESCO designated World Heritage Site. Photo courtesy of US National Park ServiceThe U.S. is quitting UNESCO, the United Nations organization that coordinates international efforts to foster peace and sustainable development, and to eradicate poverty. The Trump administration made the announcement on 12 October. The withdrawal takes effect December 31, 2018, and the U.S. will remain a full member until then.“This decision was not taken lightly, and reflects U.S. concerns with mounting arrears at UNESCO, the need for fundamental reform in the organization, and continuing anti-Israel bias at UNESCO,” said Heather Nauert, a U.S. State Department spokesperson in a press statement.The U.S. does, however, say it will seek to stay engaged with the organization as a non-member observer state in order to “contribute U.S. views, perspectives and expertise on some of the important issues undertaken by the organization,” including the protection of World Heritage Sites and the promotion of scientific collaboration.Trump isn’t the first U.S. president to have antagonism toward the organization. Although America has played an important role in UNESCO since its creation after World War II, Trump’s predecessors have been quarreling with it since the 1970s.“We were in arrears to the tune of $550 million or so, and so the question is, do we want to pay that money?” Nauert said at a news briefing, making clear that “with this anti-Israel bias that’s long documented on the part of UNESCO, that [U.S. relationship] needs to come to an end.”But what does the Trump Administration’s withdrawal mean for UNESCO environmental programs worldwide? And will the loss of U.S. money matter?A moment of great hope. UNESCO declares 2015 the International Year of Light at the Paris Climate Summit. President Trump’s announcement that the U.S. is withdrawing from the world scientific body has led experts to express distress at the harm the decision will do to the planet’s people, especially Americans. Photo by Athalfred DKL on VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-NDUNESCO environmental and science programsThe UN Educational, Scientific, Cultural Organization was founded in 1945, and is a catalyst for far-reaching and important environmental and sustainable development initiatives. Today it’s the only UN organization with a clear science mandate, and it works on a broad scope of environmental issues, directing projects from a scientific, cultural, social and educational perspective.UNESCO’s Natural Sciences Sector, headquartered in Paris, has a staff of 120, with 54 field offices around the world, and it hosts major international programs in the freshwater, ecological, earth and basic sciences.Its activities deal with the ecological sciences (Man and the Biosphere Programme and World Network of Biosphere Reserves), water security (International Hydrological Programme and World Water Assessment Programme), and earth sciences (International Geoparks and Geoscience Programme, and disaster risk reduction).Man and the Biosphere (MAB) is one of UNESCO’s best-known programs, with its World Network of Biosphere Reserves (WNBR). Launched in 1971, MAB seeks to improve relationships between people and their environments by protecting areas nominated by national governments. MAB reserves remain under sovereign jurisdiction of the states where they’re located, but enjoy international recognition.“Biosphere Reserves are learning places for sustainable development whose aim is to reconcile biodiversity conservation and the sustainable use of natural resources,” read a recent UNESCO press statement when it added 23 new sites to WNBR. The Trump Administration is voluntarily withdrawing 17 sites from the program. However, withdrawal isn’t unusual and other countries including the U.K., Austria, Australia, Norway, Bulgaria, and Sweden have withdrawn MAB sites in the past. Among those being withdrawn by the U.S. currently is the Hubbard Brook, New Hampshire, U.S. Forest Service reserve, where groundbreaking forest ecosystem and climate research has been ongoing for decades.Today WNBR encompasses 669 sites in 120 countries, including 16 transboundary biosphere reserves, covering over 680 million hectares (2.6 million square miles) of inland, coastal and marine areas, and representing all major ecosystem types and diverse development contexts. These areas are home to approximately 207 million people ranging from rural and indigenous communities to urban dwellers.Not only famous for its earth science research, UNESCO launched an international campaign to save the Abu Simbel Temple monuments in Egypt in the 1960s from being flooded by Lake Nasser as it backed up behind the Aswan High Dam. The project drew unprecedented international attention and praise for UNESCO’s protection of the world’s cultural heritage. Photo on VisualHunt.comWater programsThe International Hydrological Programme (IHP) does scientific, educational and capacity building around water issues. IHP promotes an interdisciplinary, integrated approach to watershed and aquifer management, and does international research in the hydrological and freshwater sciences.It also assists UNESCO member states in water security efforts, addressing challenges such as water-related disasters and hydrological changes, groundwater, water scarcity and quality, and ecohydrology – the study of the interrelationships between hydrological and biological processes required to enhance water security and lessen ecological threats.The World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP) produces an annual World Water Development Report, a coordinated effort achieved across the UN system and provides a clear picture of the state of the world’s freshwater resources to member nations.Pamukkale, Turkey, a UNESCO World Heritage Site famous for its hot springs and enormous white terraces of travertine, a carbonate mineral sediment left by flowing water. Photo on Visualhunt.comEarth science programsUNESCO’s programs in earth sciences support research that informs current challenges such as evidence of global change from the geological record, geoscience of the water cycle, or environmental geodynamics.The Environmental and Health Impacts of Mining Activities in Sub-Saharan African Countries is a good example of how valuable this knowledge can be. This programme in fact does not only aim to understand how the mining activities (and particularly abandoned mines) negatively affect the soils, animals, plants and fungi, surface and groundwater, and the health of neighboring communities. It also experiments with the most appropriate mining rehabilitation technologies, and provides science-based data to governments and local authorities on both land-use planning and technologies to mitigate environmental disaster in contaminated regions.UNESCO Global Geoparks are areas where landscapes and sites of international geological significance are managed via a holistic approach to protection, education and sustainable development. As of today, there are 127 Geoparks in 35 countries, ranging from Vietnam to Brazil.The Organization also supports the meaningful inclusion of local and indigenous knowledge in biodiversity conservation and management, especially climate change assessment and adaptation via the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES).UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) has its own membership and a separate chapter in the Organization’s program and budget. IOC is the only body devoted to marine science within the UN system, and the United States has been involved in it since its establishment in 1960, mainly through the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The future of that relationship is uncertain now.The U.S. has played an important role in many IOC programs critical to ocean health and the wellbeing of coastal communities. For instance, the Global Tsunami Warning System that covers four major ocean basins (Pacific, Indian, Caribbean, and Mediterranean/North Eastern Atlantic), or the Harmful Algal Blooms program, which develops research and provides guidance to address “red tides” now threatening a wide range of coastal economic sectors (fishing, tourism, navigation, aquaculture).NOAA and NASA are also pivotal to IOC’s Global Ocean Observing System: the U.S. has in particular been leading the deployment of Argo floats around the globe to enhance measurements of ocean temperature, salinity and currents. The U.S. is a key contributor to observations of sea-level rise, ocean water acidification and a number of other variables to enhance understanding and predict trends and impacts of climate change, El Niño, and other ocean-related phenomena. It is uncertain precisely how that relationship will function in future.Okavango Delta, Botswana, World Heritage Site. This permanent marshland and seasonally flooded plain is one of the world’s very few major interior delta systems that do not flow into a sea or ocean. The Okavango Delta is home to some of the world’s most endangered species of large mammal, including the elephant, cheetah, white rhinoceros, black rhinoceros, African wild dog and lion. © Pete Hancock / UNESCOWho benefits, who gets hurt?“While the U.S. will remain engaged in many of these programs, the absence of U.S. funding makes it increasingly difficult to meet the challenges that are so vital to the lives and livelihoods of millions of Americans,” George Papagiannis, UNESCO’s Media Services Chief told Mongabay in an email, pointing out that “an ounce of investment is worth a pound of cure.”Papagiannis stressed a simple fact: UNESCO programs, and the critical environmental problems they seek to solve, do not only result in benefits to countries far from the White House, but instead greatly benefit the United States and millions of American citizens.“A submerged lower Manhattan during hurricane Sandy, or the blooming red tides that affect the East Coast and Gulf of Mexico, are reminders that the U.S. is no safer than most countries from ocean related hazards,” he said, adding that no single country, regardless of national capacity, can tackle these cross-border issues on its own.“Whether it is about safeguarding coastal economies and jobs, ensuring people’s safety and public health, or protecting infrastructures, U.S. investments on IOC activities in ocean science and services create benefits to its citizens that far outweigh the costs,” he said.Ancient Maya City and Protected Tropical Forests of Calakmul, Campeche, Mexico, a World Heritage Site – a valued natural and cultural landscape located in the central/southern Yucatan Peninsula. The site protects both the ancient Mayan city of Calakmul and a large section of the Mesoamerica biodiversity hotspot, which encompasses all subtropical and tropical ecosystems from central Mexico to the Panama Canal. © Archivo/RBC-CONANPThe IOC also provides an intergovernmental coordination platform for effective collective action, from which all Member States benefit. Of course, that cooperative approach doesn’t fit in well with President Trump’s “Make America Great Again,” go-it-alone approach.As an example, the UN General Assembly is discussing a proposal by IOC to declare 2021-2030 as the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, under the UN’s global coordination. “The U.S. government and its scientific institutions stand to benefit enormously from participating in this collective framework for coordinating and consolidating the observations and research needed to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goal 14 on the ocean,” Papagiannis said, pointing out that “it will be the time to bolster innovative technologies and scientific knowledge to bring tangible wellbeing and economic benefits to U.S. citizens.”It is also worth noting that much of UNESCO’s work addresses the root causes of mass human migration, promoting sustainable and equitable management of national natural resources, and providing or fostering livelihoods, notably in Biosphere Reserves.Loss of U.S. funding started in 2011Strange as it may sound, there will be no immediate financial consequences related to the U.S. withdrawal from UNESCO because the United States has not paid its dues since 2011 during the Obama administration when the Palestinian Authority was accepted into the UN agency as a full member. The funding cut then was across the board, resulting in a 22 percent hit to the UNESCO budget more than $80 million per year, according to this Foreign Policy report. Since then, all parts of the organization have adapted to new financial realities.Clearly there have been consequences since 2011, and UNESCO has never fully recovered from the loss. The approved budget allocated to Science and the International Oceanographic Commission (IOC) for the 2010-2011 biennium was $59,074,000, while the approved expenditure plan for the current biennium (2016-2017) for Science and the IOC falls below that amount, coming in at $48,308,400.The Isla Genovesa Booby Sanctuary, Tower Island, Galapagos World Heritage Site. Photo by David Broad licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported licenseAs a result, the number of permanent science positions has decreased, while less funding has meant a sharp refocusing of the Organization’s work. For example, Papagiannis says, UNESCO’s Basic Sciences efforts were severely impacted, and the organization is no longer directly involved in earth observation and remote sensing projects, with few exceptions. That’s a serious problem when one considers the rapid natural changes underway due to climate change. Furthermore, UNESCO no longer spends regular budget on renewable energy activities, and its engineering activities have been strongly curtailed.In addition to its assessed contribution, the U.S. used to fund projects directly, a procedure known as “extra-budgetary funding.” This means that UNESCO received money from the U.S. State Department, USAID, Department of Defense and National Science Foundation for seismicity and earthquake engineering in the Mediterranean and in Northeast Asia, and cooperation with the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. The last of the funds allocated as extra-budgetary were received in November 2011 and spent by 2014.One discontinued project was the Open Initiative with the Space Agencies, which included NASA, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the U.S. Geological Survey. This initiative used space imaging to monitor and protect World Heritage sites, and was discontinued five years ago. Interestingly that task has now been taken on by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, which seems to value science more than the current U.S administration.Mount Hamiguitan Range Wildlife Sanctuary, Philippines, World Heritage Site. This preserve showcases terrestrial and aquatic habitats at varying elevations, and includes threatened and endemic flora and fauna – eight species of which are found only at Mount Hamiguitan, including the iconic Philippine Eagle and Philippine Cockatoo. © Roy F. Ponce / UNESCOWho is the real loser?According to Papagiannis, “the withdrawal of the U.S. will have an impact on the United States’ level of engagement in global science programs, and in the leadership of these program.”But in statements emailed to Mongabay, a State Department official wrote “U.S. withdrawal from UNESCO does not alter U.S. policy of supporting international cooperation in educational, scientific, cultural, communication and information activities where there are benefits to the United States. By pursuing non-member observer status, it is our intention to remain participants in UNESCO programs, such as IOC, where non-member observers may have a role.”However, the statement continues, the dimensions of this observer participation remain to be defined. Currently the U.S. is focused on preparing its request for non-member observer status so that it may remain engaged on “non-politicized issues” undertaken by UNESCO.“When it is in the U.S. interest,” stressed the official, “the United States will continue to participate in UNESCO and UNESCO-related activities that do not require membership in the Organization.”Melinda Kimble, Senior Fellow at the United Nations Foundation, asserts that UNESCO’s scientific and environmental programs provide core elements that support national and regional planning for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” – a commitment to eradicate poverty and achieve sustainable development by 2030 worldwide adopted in 2015 by Heads of State and Government at a special UN summit.“Clearly, an active and fully contributing U.S. could make a difference in sustaining UNESCO’s leadership in education, science and culture,” she told Mongabay.This is not the first time the U.S. has left UNESCO. The Reagan Administration withdrew in 1984 because of concerns over many issues, ranging from Soviet Union disarmament proposals to the organization’s request for a budget increase. When the U.S. pulled out then, it was not in arrears and continued supporting UNESCO programs with voluntary financial contributions.Karibik, St. Kitts, Brimstone Hill Fortress National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Many such sites include both natural and historical treasures. Photo by giggel licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported licenseThen after an almost twenty-year absence, the U.S. rejoined the organization in 2003. President George W. Bush announced the move “as a symbol of our commitment to human dignity.… This organization has been reformed and America will participate fully in its mission to advance human rights and tolerance and learning.”As for Trump’s planned withdrawal, Kimble agrees that “Clearly, an active and fully contributing USA could make a difference in sustaining UNESCO’s leadership in education, science and culture.” She notes that while the current pullout underscores U.S. skepticism about the UN system and multilateral action in many spheres, the real damage was done not by Trump but starting in 2011 with the U.S. failure to contribute financially.“[T]he failure to pay dues has significantly undermined the capacity of the organization to deliver on its ambitious programs,” Kimble concluded.Under the terms of the original 1945 treaty establishing the United Nations and UNESCO, the U.S. as a Member State remains obligated to paying its arrears. “But this is not just about the money,” says Papagiannis. “This [withdrawal represents] a loss for multilateralism and a blow to universality, which are critical factors to addressing the issues that affect people everywhere in every country.”In October, after receiving official notification by U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova expressed profound regret at the decision.“In 2011, when payment of membership contributions was suspended at the 36th session of the UNESCO General Conference, I said I was convinced UNESCO had never mattered as much for the United States, or the United States for UNESCO. This is all the more true today, when the rise of violent extremism and terrorism calls for new long-term responses for peace and security, to counter racism and anti-semitism, to fight ignorance and discrimination,” she said in a press statement.“I believe UNESCO’s action to enhance scientific cooperation, for ocean sustainability, is shared by the American people,” she added.As the world rushes headlong into a century of scientific uncertainty – where the climate, oceans, freshwater, ecosystems and human communities grow increasingly unstable and at risk – it remains to be seen just how long America will want to go it alone, rather than joining with the rest of the world to share in the costs and benefits of international science in order to serve the common good.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Sequoia-Kings Canyon Biosphere Reserve (established 1976) is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve located in the southern Sierra Nevada of California, USA. Photo by thor_mark  on VisualHunt / CC BY-NC-SAcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Corals thrive on remotest islands in the Galápagos

first_imgOur first reef community stop in the Reefscape project was the Galápagos Islands in December 2017.We found that ocean events such as El Niño can wipe out huge areas of reef, yet coral survival and regrowth remain evident.Our direct actions, be the destructive overfishing or constructive protection, have a huge impact on the future of coral reef ecosystems.One size does not fit all when it comes to coral reefs — even an archipelago hammered by coral-killing warm waters can harbor refugia for biodiversity. Adapted from Bing Maps.The Galápagos Islands are not widely known for their coral reefs. Most visitors to the islands’ waters seek big charismatic residents like sharks, manta rays, sea lions and whales, or unique creatures like marine iguanas. Dive shops in the Galápagos almost exclusively advertise the opportunity to see these large creatures, while few mention corals. Yet the archipelago is home to vibrant reefs, and we commenced the global Reefscape project there.Perhaps so little is mentioned about reefs in the Galápagos today because of a history of coral bleaching across the archipelago. The scientific literature reports ocean temperature spikes of up to 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) during the 1982-83 and 1997-98 El Niño events, and again to a much lesser degree in 2015. El Niño’s hot waters pushed many corals beyond their thermal tolerances, resulting in widespread reef-scale bleaching.last_img read more

‘Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise’ film shows how farmers are fighting climate change

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Food, Education, Environment, Extreme Weather, Film, Flooding, Green, Oceans, Overpopulation, Population Article published by Shreya Dasgupta A recent documentary looks at how Bangladeshi farmers are adapting to rising sea levels.The film documents how Bangladeshi farmers are keeping their farms from flooding by building floating gardens made of water hyacinth and bamboo.The film won the Best Short Film at the New York WILD Film Festival, which begins on Feb. 22.Mongabay interviewed cultural anthropologist Alizé Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important. This is a story of hope.Bangladesh is extremely vulnerable to climate change. Threatened by rising sea levels, storms and cyclones, floods have become commonplace, with seawater encroaching both homes and agricultural farms. But Bangladeshi people have found ingenious ways of adapting to the rising sea level. A recent documentary, “Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise,” explores one such example of resilience.To keep their farms from flooding, Bangladeshi farmers have been building floating gardens — farms made of water hyacinth and bamboo that float on water, no matter what the water level. These floating gardens help the people “fish, raise ducks, and grow produce,” Alizé Carrère, a cultural anthropologist and National Geographic explorer, told National Geographic in 2016.“Adaptation Bangladesh,” featuring Carrère and directed by documentary filmmaker Justin DeShields, looks not only at simple floating farms that farmers have traditionally used in flood-prone areas, but also explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries, and even high-tech floating farms that could potentially provide food for entire cities. For Carrère, it was important to document these “slices of hope.”“So while I sometimes wonder if people will criticize these stories as futile or inaccurate portrayals given what’s coming down the pike, I have to remind myself that those small narratives (and practices) of resilience are all that we have left,” she told Mountain film education. “And frankly, most of what we’ve used so far to push people to action on climate change are doomsday narratives, which clearly haven’t been working. So why not try a new, more uplifting narrative and see where it brings us?”“Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise” won the Best Short Film award at the New York WILD Film Festival, held at the Explorers Club in Manhattan, which began Feb. 22 (watch the trailer here).Mongabay interviewed Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important.Buoyant fields made of plants and manure can support crops in Bangladesh. Carrère (at right) toured several with Bangladeshi reporter Tania Rashid. Photo by Katia Nicolova.Mongabay: What makes Bangladesh a good location for a film about climate change and rising sea levels?Alizé Carrère: Bangladesh is one of the most climate vulnerable countries in the world, for a multitude of reasons. To begin with, it’s a giant river delta. Bangladesh sits at the confluence of the Ganges, Jamuna and Meghna rivers, so it’s flat and extremely wet. Any fluctuation in sea level rise or monsoon patterns dramatically impacts the population, many of whom live on or near the water. It’s also the most densely populated country on our planet — more than 160 million people live in a landmass the size of Wisconsin. That’s staggering. When you have that many people living so close together, and when the environment is so susceptible to minor fluctuations in water levels, you end up with a highly vulnerable population. On top of that it is also a very impoverished country, so the alternatives for most people are limited once flooding occurs.How did you come to look at climate adaptation efforts in Bangladesh, and how did the film come about?I actually learned about the floating gardens of Bangladesh in college, when I took a geography course at McGill University. I was fascinated by the concept: if you could build gardens that float, then you’re not beholden to your environment. Regardless of what the water level is, your farm stays afloat, continuing to provide food even during the wettest months of the year (when all fields are under water). I loved this idea, and started finding other examples of resilience and practical design in the face of change. Once I started collecting these stories, it gave rise to the idea of making a series. We started with the case study in Bangladesh.Whereas we normally hear a lot of doom and gloom about climate change, Adaptation Bangladesh seems to strike something of a hopeful note by focusing on the ways farmers are attempting to cope with sea level rise. What are some of the key adaptations you feature in the film?The film looks at four different adaptive designs as it relates to sea level rise and erratic monsoon patterns: traditional floating farms made of extremely simple materials (all organic plants), more advanced floating farms made with recycled materials, floating school boats and libraries, and finally, large-scale, high-tech floating farms out in the ocean that could provide food for entire cities.In your time with them, how hopeful did these farmers seem that they could adapt to climate change and even perhaps continue to thrive in a warming world?That’s a tough question, and I think it changes depending on where you are and who you’re talking to. Bangladeshis have always lived with, on and around water, and therefore constantly adjust to it. To be surrounded by water demands, in some way, that you always stay present. You can’t project too far into the future about the way things will be, because water is incredibly fickle and may be one way today and completely different tomorrow. And when that’s your dominant landscape feature, you get pretty good at, quite literally, going with the flow. From our conversations, and from what I saw, this seemed to be the prevailing attitude. That’s not to say there isn’t suffering and difficulty with that reality, but it’s more of a take-each-day-as-it-comes mentality.Bangladeshi farmers use floating farms to grow food. Photo by Katia Nicolova.These farmers must still be facing significant challenges. Which of those challenges seemed most daunting to you?Population growth. I can’t put into words how intense it is to be immersed in such a densely inhabited area such as Dhaka, the capital city. I had never seen anything like it. You can be the most sustainable population in the world, but when there’s 160 million of you – and the land on which you live is disappearing before your very eyes – it’s not easy. Population growth is something we have to start thinking about more seriously in general, somehow it seems like the climate change conversation has taken over the population conversation in the last two decades. I don’t have the answer to it, but I do think we underestimate the power of educating girls and young women. When they have agency in their own lives, it creates a trickle-down effect and results in healthier decision-making for themselves and their families.There is obvious value in telling these farmers’ stories, but what do you hope this film can achieve in a broader sense? What are the main takeaways for people who maybe don’t live in an area subject to such severe sea level rise?I always say that adaptation is more of a mindset than it is a practice. To me, this project is about waking up the part of ourselves that has allowed us to exist for as long as we have in the first place – and that’s our ability to be resilient and adaptive in our thinking. Most of my work is looking at the positive, but truthfully, the most depressing part is that those of us living in relative comfort and stability are the least adaptable of all! It gets back to the old adage, “necessity is the mother of invention.” There’s something about people who have nothing between them and environmental change that we can all learn from, and my goal with this series is to start bringing those lessons of creativity into classrooms so that young minds can start thinking differently for our future. We will not solve our present-day issues with traditional, linear approaches. I do a lot of work in schools and with educators, and it’s amazing to see how kids absorb this content. They are so much better at it than adults – they have no limits to their imagination, and that’s exactly what we need.What are the distribution plans for the film? When and where can the public see it?We’re still working on that right now, but in the meantime I’m working on putting together a website. Ultimately this project is more than just the series. With the help of an educational consultant, we’re starting to design curriculum around each case study, so that any student, teacher or citizen can go to the site, watch the episodes, and then download educational content if they want to dive deeper into the issues. I’m hoping to have this up by the end of the year.This film is part of a series, correct? What’s coming next?Yes, that’s right. It’s a 6-part series that looks at 6 distinct case studies around the world where we see people innovatively adapting to landscape changes. I’ve been following these different case studies/communities for the last few years now, and will be heading to Vanuatu for the month of May as the next installment. I don’t want to reveal too many details, but it has to do with starfish compost!Large farms made of water hyacinth keep the farms afloat and safe from floods. Photo by Katia Nicolova.The film explores not just traditional floating farms but explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries. Photo by Andy Maser.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Should Pacquiao still strive for a knockout?

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Possible venues mentioned included Melbourne and Sydney.There were other details that should be clarified. For example, there has been no word on Hall-of-Fame trainer Freddie Roach, who had made himself scarce after Pacquiao was upset by Horn in Brisbane last July 2.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’Did Roach and Pacquiao have a pleasant parting of ways after the Battle of Brisbane?Post-fight eyewitness accounts had pictured a gloomy and tense dugout scene, with Pacquiao fervently attending to his hairdo, while Roach was left to stare around. Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite There are things that must be cleared now. For the record, Roach had allowed Pacquiao only one last fight—the Horn rematch—after the controversial bloody upset of July 2.Several pundits, this early, would also like to know if Roach would still stick to his original order for Pacquiao to push for a knockout against the bigger, younger Horn.Pacquiao came very close to either downing or stopping Horn in the ninth round of the encounter in Brisbane.Observers were one in saying that Horn’s toughness, after he survived a monster onslaught by the ferocious Pacquiao, was almost miraculous.Either Horn had proved bigger than life, or wholly tough and too courageous.ADVERTISEMENT Gilas sews up QF berth End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ Or was it a case of Pacquiao realizing right there and then he had lost his original power, if not his killer instinct? He was observed going faintly through the motions [of striking hard] in the final minute of the 12th round, which he clearly lost.Still, there was the prevailing post-fight punch audit which showed Pacquiao could’ve clearly claimed a unanimous verdict if he had just fought normally well, and not allowed himself to be limited to throwing punches mainly to the head.For one, there was Nonito Donaire who would later say that Pacquiao should’ve been made to go for the body, noting that Horn had been through a horrible weight reducing regimen on the eve of the championship.There was another thing that should be made clear: Who between Pacquiao and Roach faulted?Did Roach suffer a blackout, after failing to order an attack to the [very] open body in the middle rounds?Shouldn’t Pacquiao refuse to be operated like a rusty knockout robot—and instead fight his normal good fight—next time around?Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next APVeteran promoter Bob Arum claims that Manny Pacquiao, raring to go, has provided his preferred dates for the rematch against WBO welterweight champion Jeff Horn of Australia.This was all to be expected, and the rematch could be held later in the year, when the Philippine Senate will be in recess.ADVERTISEMENT 2 nabbed in Bicol drug stings 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano Teen gunned down in Masbate MOST READ Albay to send off disaster response team to Batangas View comments LATEST STORIES Ai-Ai delas Alas on Jiro Manio: ‘Sana pinahalagahan niya ang naitulong ko’ Vilma Santos, Luis Manzano warn public of fake account posing as her 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcanolast_img read more

Afcon safety, security systems ‘in place’

first_img28 November 2012South Africa has put effective plans in place to ensure a safe and secure 2013 Africa Cup of Nations (Afcon) tournament, Deputy Police Minister Maggie Sotyu told reporters in Pretoria on Tuesday.“Everything is in place with regards to security; we started planning as early as May this year, [and] both national and international screening with regard to all participating 16 teams has been completed,” Sotyu said.“Security will be provided to all the participating teams including Bafana Bafana 24/7. We will strengthen security at all ports of our entry during this period, especially our borders, airports, seaports and land ports of entry.“All the teams will be escorted from the airport to their respective hotels; teams will also be escorted from their hotels to their training venues 24/7 to make sure that they are safe,” she said.Sotyu also said permanent police officers would be deployed to all the hotels where the national teams will be staying.She said Home Affairs was ready to handle the movement of both people and goods at the ports of entry.“We also have our own police officers that we’ve trained with regard to assistance at the ports of entry in case we need more man power,” she said.“Buses carrying players will be escorted by the police all the times; each and every movement of the buses carrying the teams will be provided with security by the police.”Dedicated investigators for criminal casesWith regard to criminal cases during the tournament, Sotyu said that unlike the 2010 Fifa World Cup there wouldn’t be special courts for criminal activities, but there would be dedicated investigators who will focus on the cases that happen during the tournament.While there would be the normal procedure of handling the cases, she said criminal cases committed during the tournament will always be prioritised in the courts of law.Police were going to make sure that they control the crowd in and outside the stadiums.Chairperson of the National Joint Intelligence Structure, Lieutenant-General Elias Mawela, said part of their security concept to effectively deal with any form of hooliganism in the stadiums was also in place.“Part of our security concept to deal with hooliganism in and around the stadiums includes ensuring that we put ‘spotters’ among the spectators to identity the so- called hooligans, remove them from the stadium and take them into police custody.“We will ensure that the intelligence community that we are working with in the region, through the Southern African Regional Police Chief Council Organisation (Sarpcco) and Interpol, will also assist us with the movement of the people who will be coming to our country for the tournament,” he said.Sarpcco is an official forum comprising all the police chiefs from southern Africa.“We are not going to drop the standards which we’ve created in dealing with all the major events that we host in our country,” he said.Should the security guards, who will be working at the stadiums, decide to embark on an illegal strike like they did during the 2010 Fifa World Cup, General Mawela said: “We have plan D and even plan E.”“We have a reserve group at a national level who can be moved around the country at any given time and we also have the contingency funds whereby we will ensure that people will be moved around head office to whatever affected stadium. We will never have any problem with regards to this issue.”South Africa will host the tournament from 19 January to 10 February 2013.Source: SANews.gov.zalast_img read more

Top stories of 2018: No. 10

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Our web site keeps track of the stories that generate the most interest and at the end of the year we like to review the top stories to gain insight into how to better serve readers of our web and print content and our radio listeners. Plus, it is always fun to see which story comes out on top. To revisit all of these favorite web stories and videos in the last year, look for “2018 top stories of the year” on the right side of this web page. In addition to these top posts, other noteworthy drivers of web traffic in 2018 included the Ohio and Pro Farmer crop tours, the Ohio State Fair livestock show results, and Between the Rows. Weather challenges, the tough farm economy, and all things draft horse also garnered major web traffic in the last 12 months. Here is the tenth most popular web story from 2018Kasich announces executive order directed at agriculture and water qualityThis is the story that kicked off #WaterDrama18 after Governor John Kasich signed an executive order to take action on water quality in Lake Erie with Ohio’s agriculture in the crosshairs. After staunch agricultural opposition and some political wrangling on both sides of the issue, the debate has been tabled until the start of the DeWine Administration.last_img read more

WATCH: PBA Q&A with Blackwater rookie Paul Desiderio

first_imgHotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue View comments Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss PBA rookie Paul Desiderio talks about his rookie struggles and how he can translate his ‘atin to!’ spirit to the pros with Blackwater. Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img MOST READ SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Kevin Alas raring to prove he’s better than before despite ACL injury LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Dara Singh to present Hindi version of The Champ, movie to be called Rustom

first_imgKishore and Leena: A swoop by taxmenEven as Bombay’s film industry showed up in full strength for New Delhi’s International Film Festival, having dropped their threatened boycott over last month’s income tax raids, income tax officers suddenly swooped on popular playback singer, Kishore Kumar and screen siren Leena Chandavarkar, whom,Kishore and Leena: A swoop by taxmenEven as Bombay’s film industry showed up in full strength for New Delhi’s International Film Festival, having dropped their threatened boycott over last month’s income tax raids, income tax officers suddenly swooped on popular playback singer, Kishore Kumar and screen siren Leena Chandavarkar, whom Bombay’s film press describe as the “much married Kumar’s lady love”. Although the raid on Kumar’s residence yielded virtually nothing, income tax sources claimed that the Chandavarkar raid was more productive, but they refused to disclose the amount. In a simultaneous raid, Rs 12 lakh was discovered in a disused well in a farm just outside Bombay. Taxmen were tightlipped about the owner or exact whereabouts. Neither Chandavarkar nor Kumar were available for comment. But Kumar’s son who seems to have been posted to take care of inquisitive reporters said: “Yes, we were raided. But how dare you ask questions’ about my father’s personal life?”(From left) Dass, Mushtaq Ali, Singh (actors in Rustom) and Dilip Kumar, who launched the filmFirst there was an Indian Rocky, then an Indian Love Story, and now, ladies and gentlemen, Bombay’s eternal strongman Dara Singh is proud to present a Hindi version of The Champ to be called Rustom. The way the casting goes, the movie ought to be called Four Champs. As many as “four international champions” boasts the blurb, “are involved in the all-sports movie”. These include Janki Dass (international cycling champion), Mushtaq Ali (international cricketer), Dara Singh himself (international wrestling champion) and Randhawa (another international wrestler). Last week, the movie was launched by Bombay’s ex-sheriff Dilip Kumar (“he came to bless the sports celebrities” quoth Singh) but described Dilip as “the matinee idol and keen cricketer”. Obviously, the “international” category is for champs only.Sadachari : Quick fallHere is one swami who crashed before he could fly. Swami Sadachari, the portly, long-maned Bihari Bramhin, last fortnight found himself jettisoned from the voodoo clique that surrounds Mrs Gandhi, before he could fire the first shot at his prime target, Dhirendra Brahmachari. The 24-year-old yogi, called Brahmachari a “fraud” – and that proved to be his undoing. Within 24 hours, a spokesman of the prime minister’s office issued a terse statement which made him a persona non grata with the hocus pocus hierarchy. Sadachari, alias Binodanand Jha, who reportedly served as cook to another swami, promptly summoned the press to predict that 1981 could be a bad year for Mrs Gandhi. While Sadachari’s prestige dipped, the stock of his patron, Kamal Nath, MP, too hit a new low. As an aide to Brahmachari gleefully remarked: “We never knew this Sadachari fellow to be anything other than Kamal Nath’s valet.” Sadachari hotly denied it, saying: “I’ve never been anybody’s valet or cook.” But even without being either, he has got himself and Nath shoulder-deep into a perfect soup.advertisementlast_img read more

9 months agoFulham eyeing Leicester fullback Danny Simpson

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Fulham eyeing Leicester fullback Danny Simpsonby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFulham are eyeing Leicester City fullback Danny Simpson.The Mirror says Cottagers boss Claudio Ranieri wants a Leicester reunion with Simpson to help Fulham ‘s battle against relegation.Ranieri led Leicester to the title in 2016 and is desperately looking to strengthen his squad in the January window.Leicester full back Simpson, 32, could be available to loan this month. last_img