10 months agoNice chief Julien Fournier a target for Southampton

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Nice chief Julien Fournier a target for Southamptonby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNice chief Julien Fournier is a target for Southampton.The Daily Mail says Fournier, the general manager of French club Nice, is lined up to be the next director of football at Southampton.The vastly experienced 44-year-old who played a key role in persuading Patrick Vieira to become Nice’s manager, has worked previously as secretary general of Marseille and was the youngest president of Strasbourg.Southampton sacked Les Reed as vice-chairman in November and technical director Martin Hunter.The club’s Chinese owner, Gao Jisheng and his family, who took control in the summer of last year, have been working on a restructure of the club after appointing highly-rated Ralph Hasenhuttl as manager. last_img read more

9 months agoFulham eyeing Leicester fullback Danny Simpson

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Fulham eyeing Leicester fullback Danny Simpsonby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFulham are eyeing Leicester City fullback Danny Simpson.The Mirror says Cottagers boss Claudio Ranieri wants a Leicester reunion with Simpson to help Fulham ‘s battle against relegation.Ranieri led Leicester to the title in 2016 and is desperately looking to strengthen his squad in the January window.Leicester full back Simpson, 32, could be available to loan this month. last_img

11 days agoKuyt says Liverpool too strong for Man Utd

first_imgKuyt says Liverpool too strong for Man Utdby Paul Vegas11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool hero Dirk Kuyt says they’ll be too strong for Manchester United.Liverpool travel to United on Sunday to rekindle what is one of the fiercest rivalries in football. “If you look into the Liverpool side now, I think they have a lot of confidence, and they should have because they are a great team,” Feyenoord youth coach Kuyt said.“I think they can win there.“It’s a belief, and you always give everything for the shirt. Play as a team and never give up. That’s what we did at the time.“If you watch the Liverpool team now, they never give up, even in difficult times they’re winning games, they keep winning and hopefully they will do at Old Trafford as well.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

St Louis upset of Memphis headlines NCAA Tournament action at Nationwide Arena

Day one of the NCAA Tournament in Columbus Friday did not disappoint. Midwest No.11-seed North Carolina State, Midwest No. 3-seed Georgetown, West No.9-seed Saint Louis and West No.1-seed Michigan State all won, advancing to the third round. Georgetown and N.C. State is scheduled to meet in the first game at Nationwide Arena at 12:15 p.m. Sunday, with MSU and SLU 30 minutes following, with berths to the Sweet 16 on the line. Midwest Region’s No. 11-seed North Carolina State upsets No. 6 Seed San Diego State, 79-65 Playing in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2006, the No. 11-seeded North Carolina State Wolfpack (23-12) upended No. 6-seed San Diego State (26-8), taking advantage of its superior play in the paint on the way to a 79-65 victory. N.C. State got a team-high 22 points from junior forward Richard Howell, and sophomore guard Lorenzo Brown added 17 while grabbing nine rebounds. “I thought today inside around the basket we were able to get a lot done,” N.C. State coach Mark Gottfried said. “And I thought Richard (Powell) in the first half was just sensational. And it wasn’t just him. But Richard really set the tone for us offensively.” It was a two-man show for SDSU, as sophomore guard Jamaal Franklin (23) and junior guard Chase Tapley (19), combined for 42 of the Aztecs’ 65 points. SDSU coach Steve Fisher attributed the loss to N.C. State’s size. “It’s one thing to be big. It’s another thing to be big and good. And they’re big and good. And we had a hard time with their size,” he said. N.C. State outscored the Aztecs’ 38-18 in the paint. During the first half, neither team was able to pull away, with the lead changing six times and N.C. State on top, 33-29, after twenty minutes. The beginning of the second half was more of the same, but towards the midway point, SDSU started to miss shots, and NCST didn’t. The Wolfpack shot 65 percent from the field in the final twenty minutes, with the Aztecs only managing to hit 37 percent of their second-half shots. Midwest Region’s No. 3-seed Georgetown defeats No. 14-seed Belmont, 74-59 Georgetown and senior guard Jason Clark weren’t going to be denied this time. After being one-and-done in their previous two NCAA Tournament trips, the No.3-seeded Hoyas, propelled by Clark, played with insistence Friday, cruising past No.14-seed Belmont, 74-59, in the second round. Clark led the way for Georgetown (24-8), pouring in a game-high 21 points, while Hoyas’ freshman forward Otto Porter scored 16 and senior center Henry Sims added 15. Sophomore forward Blake Jenkins dropped a team-high 17 points for Belmont (27-8). “I think it was definitely a sense of urgency, not just for me but the whole team,” Clark said. “We know what we’ve done in the past. So it was a big thing for us to get this win today.” The urgency showed early, as Clark scored 10 of Georgetown’s first 14 points. Along with Clark’s play, the Hoyas’ used a major size advantage inside to take a 36-27 lead into half time. The lead remained around the 10-point mark for the majority of the second half. Belmont coach Rick Byrd said his team was not able to make any runs against the Hoyas’ zone defense. “I just didn’t predict that we’d face zone or that we’d do as poorly as we did,” he said. “But (Georgetown’s zone is) a great one. They’re well taught, and they’ve got great athletes.” Georgetown’s efficiency on the offensive end allowed it to stave off any Belmont runs as well. The Hoyas shot 61 percent from the field, including nearly 70 percent in the final 20 minutes. West Region’s No. 9-seed Saint Louis beats No.8-seed Memphis, 61-54 In the most competitive game of the day, No.9-seed Saint Louis (26-7) held all but one No. 8-seed Memphis (26-9) player to single-digit points in a 61-54 victory. Billikens junior guard Kwamain Mitchell led all scorers with 22, and SLU senior forward Brian Conklin played tough inside against bigger Memphis defenders, adding 16 points. Conference USA Player of the Year Will Barton was the only Tiger in double-digits with 16 points. Memphis sophomore forward Tarik Black, who Barton said Thursday was the Tigers’ biggest advantage heading into the game, was held to four points and only played 19 minutes due to foul trouble. SLU frustrated the Tigers by preventing them from getting out and running. “Honestly, they didn’t even – they didn’t have nobody on offensive boards, just one guy, and the rest of their players got back on defense,” Memphis sophomore guard Joe Jackson said. “So they basically took away the fast break, and we played into their hands, just settling for bad shots.” The first half saw back-and-forth play with the teams tied, 23-23, after 20 minutes. SLU held Memphis to 33 percent shooting, 1-of-8 from 3-point range in the first half. “To keep (Memphis) to 23 points in a half is really good, but look, that’s what we pride ourselves on is our defense,” SLU junior forward Cody Ellis said. Memphis used a 7-2 run early in the second half to get up 37-29, thanks in part to a few steals by Barton and sophomore guard Chris Crawford. The Billikens followed with a 14-5 run of their own. After a long, shot-clock beating three pointer by Mitchell, SLU led, 48-44, with fewer than five minutes to play, and held on for the victory. “We could have given up and went down, 10, 15 points, but the guys kept fighting back, making big shots and knocking down key free throws,” SLU sophomore forward Dwayne Evans said, who scored six points and grabbed 11 rebounds. West Region’s No.1-seed Michigan State beats West No.16-seed LIU Brooklyn, 89-67 It was closer than expected for the first 25 minutes, but eventually, No.1-seed Michigan State (28-7) proved why it is a top-seed, as the Spartans topped the No.16-seeded LIU Brooklyn Blackbirds (25-9), 89-67. MSU senior forward Draymond Green led the way with a triple-double, pouring in 24 points while adding 12 rebounds and 10 assists. Spartans’ centers sophomore Adrien Payne (16 points and seven rebounds) and junior Derrick Nix (18 points and eight rebounds)-combined for 34 points and 15 rebounds. “Those guys are monsters. They’re really good players and they’re really skilled. That’s why they’re a No.1 seed,” LIU Brooklyn coach Jim Ferry said, LIU Brooklyn jumped out to a five-point lead early, but it didn’t last long, as the Spartans started to feed their bigs, exploiting the Blackbirds lack of size inside. Greeen, Payne and Nix combined for 24 points and 16 rebounds in the first half, as the Spartans scored 34 of their 42 first-half points in the paint. A balanced attack kept LIU Brooklyn in the game, with eight different players scoring in the first twenty minutes. MSU led, 42-37, at the end of the first half. The Blackbirds held strong early in the second half, but a 28-12 run by MSU allowed the Spartans to cruise for the majority of the game’s final minutes. “It was a big win for us, on a team that I think is a very solid, good team. I was concerned (early), but I thought we took control in the second half,” MSU coach Tom Izzo said. read more

Researchers track global dispersion of chickens throughout history using DNA

first_img Journal information: PLoS ONE Research reveals the origins of chooks Because humans have had such a long history of moving chickens around, it’s been difficult to pin down just where they came from originally, that’s why the team decided to turn to mitochondrial DNA testing. They examined the bones of 48 chickens that have been found in various archeological sites all over the world, and which were in good enough condition to extract mitochondrial DNA. They focused particularly on a strand known as the D-Loop, because it’s not involved in functional genes which means they are retained generation after generation. In that sequence, they found clear similarities between all of the chicken samples, which they say proves that chickens all came from a common ancestor. And because the samples found in Southeast Asia (India, Malaysia and Burma) were the oldest, they were able to narrow down the origin of the chicken to one of those three countries or maybe one nearby.Prior to domestication, researchers believe chickens were simple junglefowl, which don’t migrate. This means the birds could only get to the other places they’ve traveled through being carried by people, because no other means has been found. Thus, in tracking the different locations of the birds over time, it’s possible to also track the migration of people. The research team believes for example, that chickens arrived in the Americas via several routes; Polynesia, Europe and Africa and perhaps directly from Asia, which of course coincides with theories regarding how people first arrived.Unfortunately current technology can’t yet clear the picture entirely, but the researchers are confident that advances over the next few years will allow them to pin down the actual location of the first domesticated chicken and settle the matter once and for all. More information: Storey AA, Athens JS, Bryant D, Carson M, Emery K, et al. (2012) Investigating the Global Dispersal of Chickens in Prehistory Using Ancient Mitochondrial DNA Signatures. PLoS ONE 7(7): e39171. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0039171AbstractData from morphology, linguistics, history, and archaeology have all been used to trace the dispersal of chickens from Asian domestication centers to their current global distribution. Each provides a unique perspective which can aid in the reconstruction of prehistory. This study expands on previous investigations by adding a temporal component from ancient DNA and, in some cases, direct dating of bones of individual chickens from a variety of sites in Europe, the Pacific, and the Americas. The results from the ancient DNA analyses of forty-eight archaeologically derived chicken bones provide support for archaeological hypotheses about the prehistoric human transport of chickens. Haplogroup E mtDNA signatures have been amplified from directly dated samples originating in Europe at 1000 B.P. and in the Pacific at 3000 B.P. indicating multiple prehistoric dispersals from a single Asian centre. These two dispersal pathways converged in the Americas where chickens were introduced both by Polynesians and later by Europeans. The results of this study also highlight the inappropriate application of the small stretch of D-loop, traditionally amplified for use in phylogenetic studies, to understanding discrete episodes of chicken translocation in the past. The results of this study lead to the proposal of four hypotheses which will require further scrutiny and rigorous future testing. (Phys.org) — The lowly chicken has had a remarkable impact on human history, providing a food source for innumerable people over the years. Modern scientists believe chickens (Gallus gallus) were first domesticated over 5000 years ago somewhere in Southeast Asia, and since that time have been carried to every place that humans exist. Tracking their migration helps historians track human migration. Now new research by a team made up of people from a variety of sciences from around the world has found, using mitochondrial DNA evidence from bones of ancient chickens, what they believe to be the great-grandmother’s of the modern chicken. They have published their findings in the journal PLoS One. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Citation: Researchers track global dispersion of chickens throughout history using DNA (2012, July 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-track-global-dispersion-chickens-history.html A close up of the E and D branches of a Maximum Parsimony Network showing the affinities of ten of the eleven, non-continuiously numbered, ancient haplogroups detected in our 48 samples with those previously defined by Liu et al. Image: PLoS ONE 7(7): e39171. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0039171 © 2012 Phys.Org Explore furtherlast_img read more

Cryptocurrencies Could Solve 2 Big Problems for the Cannabis Industry

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Subscribe Now Green Entrepreneur provides how-to guides, ideas and expert insights for entrepreneurs looking to start and grow a cannabis business. Add to Queue Founder of crypto site Blocklr & Growth Nuts, an organic growth co. Blockchain –shares Scott McGovern October 10, 2018 Barriers to banking and increasingly complex regulations make running a cannabis business costly and complicated, hampering what could be astronomical growth for the industry. Cannabis cryptocurrencies can solve both problems but, like all cryptocurrency, cannabis cryptocurrencies weren’t created equal. Some cannabis cryptocurrencies exist as a means to invest. Others were designed to address cannabis business’ inability to process credit cards, and little else.Out of the thriving cryptocurrency market, these cannabis cryptocurrencies stand apart.Obstacles facing the cannabis industry.Legal U.S. marijuana sales will reach between $8 billion and $10 billion in 2018. However, Americans spent a total of $56 billion on marijuana in 2017. In other words, there is a lot of room for growth in the legal cannabis industry, if not for two problems resulting from cannabis’ legal status.BankingThe biggest issue for the cannabis industry is that marijuana is still illegal federally, which means cannabis businesses do not have the same access to banking or credit card processing as other industries. Operating a cash-only marijuana business is dangerous, complex and expensive. Not only do these businesses have to transport cash in armored cars, but they often cannot open a bank account or qualify for a loan.To make matters worse, a survey found that only nine percent of Americans prefer paying in cash. Not only is having a cash-only business expensive, but it’s increasingly unprofitable in the digital age.Related: Cryptocurrency and the Allure of a Cashless Cannabis IndustryA complicated supply chain.The difficulties of managing a cash-only business extend to employee payroll and the entire supply chain. There are a lot of supplies that “plant touching” cannabis businesses — growers, retailers and transporters –have to purchase entirely in cash.On top of buying everything in cash, they also have to license, lab test and track goods. This requires adhering to contracts and complex city and state-specific regulations, like those facing marijuana growers in California. The “green rush” is more complex and expensive than it appears. Luckily, the cannabis industry can overcome these obstacles with cannabis cryptocurrency.Related: Many Licensed California Marijuana Growers Face Regulatory Roadblocks Getting Their Harvest to MarketCannabis cryptocurrencies offer a solution.Cryptocurrency is decentralized digital currency. Cryptocurrency mining, the process of solving algorithms to validate transactions within the network and ‘mint’ new coins, replaces governments, banks and credit card companies.In other words, cryptocurrency doesn’t go through a bank, but through a blockchain. Blockchain is the decentralized, unalterable ledger that records transactions. Since blockchain is not ‘owned’ by a bank that could be accused of money laundering for accepting cannabis money, it can process cannabis transactions in cryptocurrency.And because cryptocurrency is digital currency, the most common way to spend it is through mobile payment. Since digital sales will reach between $1.9 and 4 trillion by 2020, adopting cryptocurrency as a digital payment could boost business.Cannabis cryptocurrencies make sense for business-to-business transactions, too. Instead of buying fertilizer with an armored truck full of cash, a marijuana grower could pay with a click, all within the cryptocurrency market.The supply chain on blockchain.Blockchain can function as a record for virtually anything. Though blockchain started off as the digital record for Bitcoin transactions, it has rapidly expanded into the private sector.Companies including Maersk, De Beers and Walmart use blockchain to record supply chain transactions. Smart contracts—agreements with preset constraints that automatically fulfill themselves once terms are met—help move goods between vendors. And blockchain’s ledger can store information about a product, thereby guaranteeing regulatory compliance and quality.By adopting blockchain, cannabis companies could cut costs, increase efficiency and ensure product value.Related: Smart Contracts: Here Are the Practical Applications of This Exciting Blockchain Technology.Cannabis cryptocurrency marketToday, there are at least 17 cannabis cryptocurrencies. Paragon (PRG) functions as payment for a Los Angeles cannabis co-working space. PotCoin (POT), which has a high cannabis cryptocurrency market cap, has its own ATMs in Colorado.But like all cryptocurrency news, every coin and token in the cannabis cryptocurrency market has different attributes. Do your own research before you buy cryptocurrency.HempCoin (THC)Launched in 2014, HempCoin (THC) was the first cryptocurrency for agriculture. Specifically, HempCoin originated as a tobacco, hemp and cannabis cryptocurrency on Bitcoin’s blockchain.In 2018, HempCoin pivoted to create a more anonymous blockchain. Now, this cannabis cryptocurrency has masternodes, meaning computers that hold a complete copy of a cryptocurrency ledger. The more masternodes, the more decentralized a blockchain.According to their whitepaper, HempCoin has two new features. PrivateSend conceals funds’ origins and InstantSend allows for instantaneous transactions. HempCoin is integrating these features into HempPAY, their mobile and online platform, which can also function as a debit card.HempCoin is also developing a peer-to-peer payment solution. Though it, the customer first specifies how much THC they’re willing to pay. Next, the merchant scans their HempCoin wallet cryptocurrency address to receive the funds.Growers International (GRWI)Growers International (GRWI) is a cannabis cryptocurrency and blockchain for investors and growers. Investors can finance cannabis businesses through the Growers International token (GRWI), which the network will pool to make large-scale investments. The platform will eventually accept Bitcoin, Steem and DopeCoin.For growers, this cannabis cryptocurrency platform will have a cryptocurrency wallet, cannabis and cryptocurrency news, information about nutrients, grow room designs, social media and cryptocurrency price analytics. Furthermore, growers can track plant cycles, initiate smart contracts and buy supplies.According to their whitepaper, Growers International will build a grow facility in California.Tokes (TKS)Tokes (TKS) is a Waves blockchain-based cannabis cryptocurrency for buying marijuana online and in stores. In their whitepaper, Tokes explains that customers first buy Tokes (TKS) on a cryptocurrency exchange, then add it to their wallet, which will also contain product information. Next, they can spend Tokes at approved merchants. All transactions will cost one cent and take less than a minute.Additionally, Tokes offers a point of sale system. Once the merchant accepts Tokes cryptocurrency, the system automatically converts it to USD, Bitcoin or a currency of the merchant’s choosing.Cannabis businesses can also pay one another in Tokes through their platform. This is all possible through Tokes’ partnership with TheraCann, software for marijuana producers, processors and distributors. Tokes also gives merchants access to sales analytics and regulatory information.GreenMed (GRMD)GreenMed (GRMD) has an app that functions as a credit card for marijuana purchases. The app converts a user’s USD into GRMD tokens. Once the dispensary receives the tokens, GreenMed converts them back into USD. These funds can be transferred to a bank account or withdrawn via the GreenMed debit card.Though the app, the customer can choose between dispensaries, strains, pick up and delivery and packaging options. Additionally, GreenMed will have its own delivery service, though the app can function as in-store payment.Overall, the purpose GreenMed token is to facilitate in-app transactions with USD, according to GreenMed’s whitepaper.Cryptocurrency is an affordable and convenient method of digital payment. The ability to bypass financial institutions makes cryptocurrency adoption especially beneficial for the cannabis industry.Furthermore, cannabis could benefit from blockchain adoption. The distributed ledger can securely store data and ensure strain quality and regulatory compliance, all while facilitating business-to-business payments.For investors, marijuana consumers and cannabis farmers alike, cannabis cryptocurrency is the way of the future. And Growers International, GreenMed, HempCoin and Tokes are four cannabis cryptocurrencies poised to redefine the cannabis market. Next Article Cryptocurrencies Could Solve 2 Big Problems for the Cannabis Industry Contributor Marijuana businesses are mostly blocked from banks and have onerous compliance obligations. Blockchain is a promising solution to both problems. Get 1 Year of Green Entrepreneur for $19.99 Image credit: GeorgePeters | Getty Images 7 min readlast_img read more

General Mills Has Released Its First New Cereal in 15 Years Start

first_imgStart Up Your Day Add to Queue Looking for the latest headlines in small business, innovation and tech? Our Start Up Your Day recaps are posted every morning to keep you current.Tick-tock. Uber will allow more of its drivers to fine passengers who show up more than two minutes late to their pickup location.Streaming up. Blizzard Entertainment and Facebook are teaming up to blend Facebook Live and logins into Overwatch PC and other popular video games.Priorities. Microsoft has released new planner software, giving Trello some competition.High end. Coach Apple Watch bands are expected to come out on June 12.Balanced breakfast. General Mills has released Tiny Toast, its first new cereal since 2001.A new combination. Burger King has merged a Whopper with a burrito, creating the Whopperrito.Jumpstart. When graduating or setting out on a new path, many people receive the same tidbit of advice — “follow your passion.” But this psychologist says not everyone may know what their passion is just yet.Last man standing. In an effort to revitalize its business, GoPro is investing in making its own video-editing software. Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Lindsay Friedman Image credit: Joe Raedle | Getty Images Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. June 7, 2016 Enroll Now for $5 General Mills Has Released Its First New Cereal in 15 Years — Start Up Your Day Roundup Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Next Article –shares 1 min read Staff writer. Frequently covers franchise news and food trends.last_img read more

Researchers achieve breakthrough in blood vessel engineering

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 6 2018When someone has a deadly disease or sustains a life-threatening injury, a transplant or graft of new tissue may be the best — or only — treatment option. Transplanted organs, skin grafts and other parts need blood vessels to bring oxygen-rich blood their way, but for tissue engineers and regenerative medicine experts, making a functional blood vessel network within large tissues in the laboratory has long been a major challenge.Now, a research group at the University of Delaware has pioneered methods to grow a self-assembling, functional network of blood vessels at a size relevant for human use. Jason Gleghorn and his colleagues are the first to make this system work at this scale, and their results were recently published in the journal Biomaterials.Gleghorn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Delaware, studies how the embryo builds tissues and organs during development with the goal of using this knowledge to define new regenerative medicine strategies. While other groups have made blood vessel networks that span millimeters in size, the UD system works across centimeter scales, necessary for functional tissue replacement. With more development and refinement, Gleghorn’s microfluidic system could someday be utilized to grow blood vessels for tissue and organ transplantation into humans.How to build blood vessel networksThe team embedded human blood vessel cells into a gel made of collagen, a protein found in connective tissue such as skin and joints. The goal was to determine the physical conditions necessary to make the cells grow, multiply and connect with each other so that a network of blood vessels assembled itself.Making blood vessel networks is tricky business because the system doesn’t always behave how investigators expect. During his doctoral training, Gleghorn was part of the first team that developed techniques to create patterned blood vessel networks for tissue engineering using microfluidic techniques.”As an engineer, we can say we think the cells need to be this far apart or the vessels need to be a certain size and spacing,” Gleghorn said. “We can create a very precise environment and structure for the cells, but the problem is that biology doesn’t work that way. The cells remodel everything. They change shape and size and push and pull on each other and the materials they are embedded in to rearrange our ‘perfect’ home that we think they need. The reality is we need to design systems that will encourage cells to remodel themselves and their environment to generate a functional tissue.”Instead, Gleghorn’s group asked: “What is the fundamental initial starting point of the system that we need, and then can we kick it in the right direction to get it to evolve and build its own architecture similar to the way your body does it during development?” he said.For one, using a powerful confocal microscope at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute, the group found that the density, or stiffness, of the collagen gel affected how the cells suspended within it behaved, ultimately affecting the size and connectivity of the vessels.Related StoriesInnovative microfluidic device simplifies study of blood cells, opens new organ-on-chip possibilitiesMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorBlood based test using AI and nanotechnology devised for chronic fatigue syndrome”It looks kind of like the holiday dessert with fruit suspended in Jell-O,” said Gleghorn of the cells in the collagen gel. “You have a bunch of cells randomly distributed throughout the volume of the gel, and if they are sparsely distributed, it gets very hard for them to talk to each other and form connections to form vessels. The languages they use are chemical signals and physical forces.” The key is to find the sweet spot of stiffness, stiff enough so that neighboring cells can interact with the material and each other, but not so stiff that the cells can’t move.The team also found that by perturbing their system in a specific way, they could affect the size and shape of the vessel networks under assembly.”From larger vessels to much smaller microvessels, which are really hard to make, we can now tune the vessel network architecture with the initial starting parameters,” said Gleghorn. This means that the new system could have applications from forming larger vessels deep within the body to tiny capillaries, the teeny vessels in your fingertips.Gleghorn’s team also found that their lab-grown blood vessels were perfusable, suggesting that blood could flow through them without leaking out of the vessels into surrounding gel. The vessel networks can also form throughout a variety of shaped gels, meaning that this system could be useful for building blood vessel networks in tissues with complicated shapes, such as the meniscus cartilage that pads your knees or a large skin graft for burn patients.In addition to Gleghorn, authors on the new paper include Joshua Morgan, a former postdoctoral scholar at UD who is now an assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside; Jasmine Shirazi, a graduate student in biomedical engineering; Erica Comber, a former undergraduate research assistant who earned an honors degree in biomedical engineering from UD in 2017 and is now pursuing a doctoral degree at Carnegie Mellon University; and Christian Eschenburg, head of R&D at Orthopedic Technology Services GmbH active in Germany, who did research in Gleghorn’s lab as part of the Fraunhofer-UD graduate student exchange program. This work was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, University of Delaware Research Foundation, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities Ralph E. Power Junior Faculty Enhancement Award and the March of Dimes Basil O’Connor Award.Now, Gleghorn’s group is learning even more about how blood vessel networks form so that they can refine their system. With Babatunde Ogunnaike, the William L. Friend Chair of Chemical Engineering, Gleghorn is mapping out mathematical formulas to describe how blood vessels form and remodel in developing chicken embryos in the egg. “Then we plan to take the math and systems engineering and couple it with the biology — the molecules and the signaling pathways — that we know, and apply it to these 3D tissue-engineered models to make more complex hierarchical blood vessel networks” said Gleghorn. That project is supported by an award from the University of Delaware Research Foundation.Source: https://www.udel.edu/udaily/2018/november/gleghorn-lab-blood-vessel-network/last_img read more

Zuckerberg Chan give 30M to Harvard and MIT for literacy

The Reach Every Reader program will combine scientific research with methods of tracking and predicting students’ reading abilities to develop a web-based screening tool to identify kindergartners at high risk of reading difficulties.MIT President Rafael Reif said “struggling to read can be a crushing blow with lifelong consequences” and when millions of children struggle, it’s “a crisis for our society.”Chan called the five-year effort “a unique combination of cutting-edge education and neuroscience research.”Zuckerberg created Facebook while a Harvard student but dropped out. Chan graduated from the Ivy League school in 2007. Explore further Facebook’s Zuckerberg to give Harvard graduation speech This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, are giving Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology $30 million to help improve the literacy skills of elementary school students across the nation. Citation: Zuckerberg, Chan give $30M to Harvard and MIT for literacy (2018, March 7) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-zuckerberg-chan-30m-harvard-mit.html read more

How to make computers faster and climate friendly

first_img ‘Approximate computing’ improves efficiency, saves energy This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. When the cryptocurrency mining company Hut 8 opened Canada’s largest bitcoin mining project outside Medicine Hat, Alta., environmentalists sounded the alarm. The plant consumes 10 times more electricity, largely produced by a natural gas-fired power plant, than any other facility in the city. Globally, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the information, communication and technology (ICT) sectors are forecast to reach the equivalent of 1.4 gigatonnes (billion metric tonnes) of carbon dioxide annually by 2020. That’s 2.7 per cent of global GHGs and roughly double Canada’s total annual greenhouse gas output.By designing energy-efficient computer processors we could reduce energy consumption, and we could reduce GHG emissions in places where electricity comes from fossil fuels. As a computer engineer specialized in computer architecture and arithmetic, my colleagues and I are confident these positive effects can be achieved with almost no impact on computer performance or user convenience. Powerful connectionsThe Internet of Things (IoT) —made up of the connected computing devices embedded into everyday objects —is already delivering positive economic and social impacts, transforming our societies, the environment and our food supply chains for the better. These devices are monitoring and reducing air pollution, improving water conservation and feeding a hungry world. They’re also making our homes and businesses more efficient, controlling thermostats, lighting, water heaters, refrigerators and washing machines. With the number of connected devices set to top 11 billion —not including computers and phones —in 2018, IoT will create big data requiring huge computations. Citation: How to make computers faster and climate friendly (2018, September 26) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-faster-climate-friendly.html Your smartphone is far more powerful than the NASA computers that put Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon in 1969, but it is also an energy hog. In computing, energy use is often considered a secondary problem to speed and storage, but with the rate and direction of technological advancement, it is becoming a growing environmental concern. Provided by The Conversationcenter_img Making computation more energy efficient would save money and reduce energy use. It would also allow the batteries that provide power in computing systems to be smaller or run longer. In addition, calculations could run faster, so computing systems would generate less heat.Approximate computingToday’s computing systems are designed to deliver exact solutions at a high energy cost. But many error-resilient algorithms like image, sound and video processing, data mining, sensor data analysis and deep learning do not require exact answers.This unnecessary accuracy and excessive energy expenditure is wasteful. There are limitations to human perception —we don’t always need 100 per cent accuracy to be satisfied with the outcome. For example, minor changes in the quality of images and videos often go unnoticed. Computing systems can take advantage of these limitations to reduce energy use without having a negative impact on the user experience. “Approximate computing” is a computation technique that sometimes returns inaccurate results, making it useful for applications where an approximate result is sufficient. At the University of Saskatchewan’s computer engineering lab, we are proposing to design and implement these approximate computing solutions, so that they can optimally trade off accuracy and efficiency across software and hardware. When we applied these solutions to a core computing component of the processor, we found that power consumption dropped by more than 50 per cent with almost no drop in performance.Flexible precisionNowadays, most personal computers contain a 64-bit standard numerical format. This means that they use a number with 64 digits (either zero or one) to perform all the computations. 3-D graphics, virtual reality and augmented reality require the 64-bit format to work. But basic audio and image processing can be done with a 32-bit format and still provide satisfying results. Moreover, deep learning applications can even use 16-bit or 8-bit formats due to their error resilience The shorter the numerical format, the less energy is used to perform the calculation. We can design flexible, yet precise, computing solutions that run different applications using the most appropriate numerical format so that it promotes energy efficiency. For example, a deep learning application using this flexible computing solution could reduce energy consumption by 15 per cent, according to our preliminary experiment. In addition, the proposed solutions can be reconfigured to simultaneously perform multiple operations requiring low numerical precision and improve performance. The IoT holds a great deal of promise, but we must also think about the costs of processing all of this data. With smarter, greener processors we could help address environmental concerns and slow or reduce their contributions to climate change. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Internet of Things could improve quality of life, but it will also consume vast amounts of electricity and boost greenhouse gas emissions. 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Fizzling out – Hafizh unseated in KTM Tech3 team

first_imgThe Malaysian only scored three points after nine races thus far. Hafizh did a much better job in 2018 when he became the first rider from South-East Asia to race in the premier class.He scored 46 points and only lost out to Italian Franco Morbidelli in the fight for the Rookie of the Year award. Sepang International Circuit (SIC) chief executive officer Datuk Razlan Razali said he met Hafizh after the news broke.“The news effectively puts Hafizh without a race seat in MotoGP next year,” said Razlan. “It will be really difficult as there are no more seats available in the class. We have also secured rider contracts for our own team (Petronas Yamaha Sepang Racing Team) for next year. “But I’m confident he will be racing in the world championships. There are two offers available for him in Moto2 and he needs time to decide. “I’m sure Hafizh will make the right decision based on the circumstances and we at the SIC will do our best to assist,” added Razlan. The SIC are also running their own team in Moto2 with Khairul Idham Pawi expected to return to action when the season resumes with the Czech Grand Prix in Brno next month. Motorsport 03 Jul 2019 Hafizh eyes more points in Germany after Holland boost Related News Motorsport 07 May 2019 Hafizh looking to bounce back after birthday bummer PETALING JAYA: Hafizh Syahrin Abdullah’s (pic) run in the MotoGP will come to an end next year.Hafizh has lost his seat in the KTM Tech3 team to 2016 Moto3 world champion Brad Binder of South Africa.The team announced that Binder and Portugal’s Miguel Oliveira will be their riders for the 2020 season. The sad outcome for Hafizh was expected as he has been struggling since the team switched from Yamaha to KTM bike this season.center_img Related News {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Motorsport 09 Jul 2019 Quartararo vows to bounce back from disastrous outing at German GPlast_img read more