CDC cites bacterial infections in some H1N1 deaths

first_imgEditor’s note: This story was revised Sep 29 to correct a detail about when pneumonia cases were diagnosed.Sep 28, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Almost one third of a group of patients who died in the past 4 months from H1N1 influenza had bacterial infections that complicated their illnesses, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today in a conference call with healthcare providers. But the agency cautioned against applying that ratio to all cases of H1N1, saying the death records it reviewed were submitted by hospitals and medical examiners and did not represent a statistically valid sample.Nevertheless, the 22 cases (among 77 deaths confirmed to be from H1N1) emphasize that bacterial co-infections are playing a role in the ongoing pandemic, something that was not clear at first, the CDC’s Dr. Matthew Moore said on the call.”During the early part of this pandemic, evidence of bacterial co-infection was pretty much absent,” Moore said during the call, part of the CDC’s “Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity” program. That “may have led to the perception that bacterial co-infection is playing only a limited or maybe even no role in this current pandemic. . . . [But] bacterial pneumonia may be contributing to influenza-associated mortality in a manner similar to that in previous pandemics.”The 77 patients whose deaths and autopsy data were evaluated by the CDC are expected to be described in a forthcoming article in the agency’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. They ranged in age from 2 months to 84 years, with a median age of 39. Nine out of 10 had some underlying condition that made them vulnerable to the severest effects of flu, such as obesity, cardiac disease, asthma, diabetes, or HIV infection. Three were women in the last trimester of pregnancy.All appear to have been severely ill: 63% received influenza antivirals and 81% were put on ventilators. Pneumonia was diagnosed before death in 39% of the cases.The 22 patients (29%) who were confirmed to have bacterial complications were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), Staphylococcus aureus, Group A strep, and Haemophilus influenzae. (Four were infected with more than one bacterial type.) Five of the seven S aureus infections involved methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strains.Moore said the CDC is especially concerned that 16 of the 22 fall into categories of people who are recommended to receive pneumococcal vaccine because of their age or underlying chronic conditions. The agency received limited clinical data on the cases and thus could not say whether they received the vaccine—but it is well-known, Moore said, that only 16% of Americans who should receive pneumococcal vaccine do so.In response, the CDC is urging people at high risk for pneumococcal disease to be vaccinated, Moore said: “If you add up all the people in the United States who should have received pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine but have not yet received it, that totals 70 million individuals. We have a terrific opportunity here to prevent additional pneumococcal disease.”See also: CDC recommendation for pneumococcal vaccination for adultshttp://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5934a3.htmCDC recommendation for pneumococcal vaccination for childrenhttp://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr4909.pdflast_img read more

10 things to know about the Carrier Dome renovations

first_img Published on August 21, 2019 at 12:52 pm Contact Arabdho: armajumd@syr.edu | @aromajumder For almost the entirety of Syracuse men’s basketball head coach Jim Boeheim’s coaching career, the Carrier Dome’s iconic air-supported roof has remained a staple of SU’s campus, but from 2020 onward, a new frame will dominate the skyline. Three years ago, Syracuse University announced renovations to the Carrier Dome as a part of its Campus Framework plan, a 20-year guideline for physical campus development. Many of the major improvements are expected to be completed by the fall of 2020, including a new roof, hanging scoreboard, lighting and sound changes, a larger Wi-Fi network and improvements to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Here’s what to expect from the ongoing construction process for the renovated Carrier Dome.1. Changing timelineOriginally, University Vice President and Chief Facilities Officer Pete Sala announced that the construction of the new steel roof would commence in May 2020, and the impact on Syracuse Athletics during the 2019-2020 season would be minimal. In April, the timeline was shifted to include all Syracuse Athletics vacating the Carrier Dome on March 1. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThat could impact late-season men’s and women’s basketball play as well as home games for the men’s and women’s lacrosse teams. Commencement activities will be affected. A more concrete timeline is expected to be released early in the fall semester.2. Advantages The new roof is expected to have a 40-year lifespan, more than double its predecessor’s, and include less costs for maintenance. Inside, air conditioning and new bathrooms will bring it back up to modern standards. A new LED lighting system will turn on faster after power outages, and better Wi-Fi will also help make the gameday experience better, especially for students. “What it’s going to be when it’s renovated is the best building between New York and Toronto,” Director of Athletics John Wildhack said in April.3. No more inflatable roof Without the inflatable bubble, there will no longer be concern of clearing off snow from the roof during winters. There will also no longer be an air-lock system, making the building more friendly to hosting concerts and other non-sporting events that require materials to be transported in and out of the building quickly. Amy Nakamura | Co-Digital Editor4. Natural light?The amount of natural light entering the Dome will not be vastly different to what it is now. In 2016, Sala said the roof would be built with ethylene tetrafluoroethylene, a fluorine-based plastic, which resembles glass and is used in Minnesota’s U.S. Bank Stadium. However, making the Dome suitable for basketball with that material would have been difficult and added costs, so it was scrapped. The new roof will make the building more transparent, and over the summer, Wildhack said men’s basketball head coach Jim Boeheim was able to run camps without turning on artificial lighting until 6 or 7 p.m. 5. JumbotronA new four-sided hanging scoreboard will be added along with the roof, which will have a “wow factor” for the fans, Wildhack said in April. The scoreboard may be portable — SU could move it to the center of the Dome for football games or to the side for basketball games. 6. FundingSU Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Amir Rahnamay-Azar said in 2018 the $118 million used to fund the renovations will come from three sources: fundraising, school reserves and borrowing. More than $6 million of the funds will go toward ADA compliance. That includes elevators, accessible seating, closed captioning software and five ADA electronic door operators. 7. AmenitiesWhile major changes such as the roof are expected to be completed in time for the 2020 football season, other minor changes will continue until 2022. Air conditioning, enhanced bathrooms and new concession spaces have been listed for the longer timeline. Sala has said SU is also considering replacing some of its seating. Aesthetically, Syracuse will feature a new skyline with the addition of steel crusts stretching above the bubble-roof shape of the Dome.Daily Orange File Photo8. Parking during the processBecause of construction on the Dome, parking at the rear of the Quad parking lot will remain limited through winter break. Quad permit holders will still have access, but Service permits will only be honored based on availability. Loading docks at Falk College and Heroy Geology Laboratory will remain open. 9. CraneAn 1,100-ton crane with a boom reaching 580 feet will be used in the construction of the new steel crust roof. While construction continues with this crane, the stairs leading up to the Gate C area will remain open, Sala said. Fans and visiting teams will come in through that entrance during the 2019-20 season. A large crane pad by Gates N, E and P will feature an 800-ton crane also in place for some of the football season. When the new roof around that area is built, the crane will move to Gates F, G and H, where it will be disassembled after finishing its work. 10. New roof, same nameRahnamay-Azar said in 2018 that the Dome renovations will not alter Syracuse’s relationship with Carrier Corp., a heating and air conditioning company which has had naming rights for the Dome since 1979. But, SU did remove all 64 mentions of “Carrier” in its football media guide, Syracuse.com reported on Aug. 21.  Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Environmental policy under the Kuczynski Administration: Steps forward for conservation efforts in Peru (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Many national and foreign initiatives exist to curb deforestation in Peru; these range from the implementation of sustainable management plans to the purchase of carbon credits. Still, domestic environmental policy remains a key factor in preserving biodiversity.The election of Pedro Pablo Kuczynski in June 2016 held the potential for an improved approach towards environmental conservation.While it is still too early to determine Kuczynski’s environmental legacy, a recent series of events suggest that Peru is trying to find a balance between its need for development and the protection of its biodiversity.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Peru’s megadiversity has placed the country under an international spotlight, as its many ecosystems have become a global conservation priority. However, Peru has suffered from high deforestation rates in recent years, largely due to the expansion of small-scale agriculture.According to an official MAAP report, Peru lost approximately 4.5 million acres of Amazonian forest between 2001 and 2015. The size of this area is larger than the state of Connecticut.Many national and foreign initiatives exist to curb deforestation in Peru; these range from the implementation of sustainable management plans to the purchase of carbon credits. Still, domestic environmental policy remains a key factor in preserving biodiversity. The election of Pedro Pablo Kuczynski in June 2016 held the potential for an improved approach towards environmental conservation.While it is still too early to determine Kuczynski’s environmental legacy, a recent series of events suggest that Peru is trying to find a balance between its need for development and the protection of its biodiversity. The following initiatives demonstrate the advances and challenges that the current administration faces in relation to this process.Programa Bosques and Geo Bosques: Efforts to control deforestation and encourage sustainable land useFirst proposed at the 2008 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP14), the National Forest Conservation Program, known as Programa Bosques, has proven to be a successful conservation initiative under the Peruvian Ministry of Environment. The program aims to preserve 54 million hectares (more than 133 million acres) of tropical forest in an effort to mitigate climate change and promote sustainable development. This includes supporting sustainable forest use to increase income in local communities, mapping both forested and deforested areas, and building local and regional capacity for improved conservation. In an approach similar to the REDD+ initiative, this program makes payments to Amazonian indigenous communities to encourage forest protection.Many indigenous communities in Peru serve as custodians of the forest, benefiting from conservation programs such as Programa Bosques. Photo Credit: Enrique Ortiz.In August, the Kuczynski administration announced the expansion of Programa Bosques, which would grant an additional $3.7 million to its budget. This increase in funding will allow the program to work with over 100 additional communities over the remainder of the year and will protect another three million acres of forest. The program has preserved a total of 1.7 million acres to date, which is helping meet the goals of the initiative and the government’s commitment to achieving zero-net deforestation by 2021.Coupled with this initiative, the current government has also promoted the use of Geo Bosques (Geo Forests), a free satellite monitoring tool created under the administration of former President Ollanta Humala. Its purpose is to improve public management of lands by allowing anyone to track forest cover and loss in the Peruvian Amazon through online reports. Users have the ability to monitor individual regions, provinces, or districts. Those interested can also sign up for cellphone alerts, which warn users of encroaching deforestation; new data is available every week, providing timely information. This initiative aims to empower the public through its distribution of information, as local stakeholders and communities have proven to be effective tools against the spread of deforestation.In defense of biodiversity: Illegal mining crackdownsHome to the Tambopata National Reserve, the Amazonian region of Madre de Dios in southeastern Peru is known for being one of the most biodiverse parts of the country. However, its gold deposits and lack of law enforcement presence make it a primary target for illegal mining. Whereas corporate mining companies tend to focus on concentrated areas with gold deposits, illegal miners often sift through vast amounts of territory in a short matter of time. This, along with illegal miners’ use of mercury to extract gold, makes them a serious environmental threat.Illegal mining camps along the Madre de Dios river. Photo Credit: Enrique OrtizAlthough efforts to stop illegal mining within Tambopata Reserve began under Humala, the Kuczynski administration has continued to support this work. A June MAAP report found that deforestation due to illegal mining peaked in March and August of 2016 and then significantly decreased that September after a series of government-led raids. As a result, Peru’s National Protected Area Service (SERNANP) has concluded that 90 percent of the reserve is now free of illegal mining, an important victory for conservation efforts in Peru.However, the fight is not over. Between September 2016 and May 2017, illegal mining in the reserve buffer zone resulted in the deforestation of 1,135 acres of land. Since 2012, the buffer zone has lost a total of 10,970 acres, according to MAAP report #60. This is approximately the size of 11,000 soccer fields. However, the Kuczynski administration has continued to monitor this area, seizing 104 illegal mining operations in July followed by another interdiction this October.Protected Area Creation under the Kuczynski AdministrationThe recent declaration of Tres Cañones Regional Conservation Area in Cusco signifies another step forward for conservation efforts in Peru. As the first protected area created under the Kuczynski administration, Tres Cañones is a clear example of how environmental conservation and economic development are not mutually exclusive. Established in August, the area spans 97,570 acres and is comprised of a series of canyons formed alongside the Gran Apurímac river. Tres Cañones’ natural beauty makes it an ideal tourist destination for adventure seekers, families, and photographers alike.Tres Cañones Regional Conservation Area. Photo Credit: Walter Wust.As a result, Tres Cañones is expected to attract even more tourists to Cusco, a region that hosted over three million visitors this past year. This aligns with Kuczynski’s goal to increase annual tourism in Peru to seven million visitors by 2021.Tourism has become a vital part of Peru’s economy in recent years, comprising 9.7 percent of the country’s GDP in 2014. In comparison, mining and hydrocarbons — highly valued industries in Peru — accounted for 14 percent of the GDP in 2016. The economic power of Peru’s protected area system has the potential to expand even more, as several areas are awaiting government approval, such as Pacifico Tropical in Piura and Vista Alegre Omia in Amazonas. The Yaguas reserve zone, a protected area under a transitory status, is also in the final steps of becoming a national park, as the consultation process with local communities has been finalized. If approved, Yaguas will help protect approximately 2.7 million acres of Amazonian forest.Looking Ahead: The Fate of Conservation in Peru under the Kuczynski AdministrationWhile environmental policy under the Kuczynski administration has produced a number of positive results, a central question remains: Are these efforts enough? As the deforestation rate in Peru this year is likely to be as high as previous years, many would argue that the answer to this question is no.Traveling along the Madre de Dios river. Photo Credit: Enrique Ortiz.The proposed road between Iquitos and Saramiriza is one of the many conservation issues that requires further government analysis. One of Kuczynski’s 2016 campaign promises was to connect Iquitos to markets by road to increase economic activity. Opponents fear that the proposed road would have serious environmental impacts, as it would be constructed through part of Peru’s rainforest. However, many local people support its construction. This dichotomy demonstrates one of the central sustainability challenges in Peru.Despite the obstacles ahead, the Kuczynski administration has an opportunity to reinforce its environmental policy through the creation of protected areas, practice of sustainable development, and added support for enforcement and monitoring programs. If this is achieved, Peru could very well emerge as an environmental leader in the Western Hemisphere and face the COP23 in November with laudable achievements.CITATIONSFiner, Matt. “MAAP Synthesis #2: Patterns and Drivers of Deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon.” MAAP. February 14, 2017. http://maaproject.org/2017/maap-synthesis2/Finer, Matt. “MAAP #60: Gold Mining Increases in Buffer Zone of Tambopata National Reserve.” MAAP. May 24, 217. http://maaproject.org/2017/buffer_tambopata_2017/Haley Wiebel is a communications specialist and Enrique Ortiz is the program director at the Andes Amazon Fund. Amazon Destruction, Amazon Rainforest, Biodiversity, Commentary, Conservation, Deforestation, Editorials, Environment, Environmental Policy, Forests, Researcher Perspective Series, Tropical Forests center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Experts to China: cooperate or South China Sea fisheries may collapse

first_imgChina’s Demand For Resources, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Islands, Law Enforcement, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing Article published by Rebecca Kessler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img More than half the fishing vessels in the world operate in the South China Sea, where sovereign rights have been an object of fierce contention among bordering countries.Scientists have been warning that the sea is fast becoming the site of an environmental disaster, the impending collapse of one of the world’s most productive fisheries.Now a group of experts that includes geopolitical strategists as well as marine biologists is calling on the disputing parties to come together to manage and protect the sea’s fish stocks and marine environment.Effective management hinges on China’s active participation, but it remains unclear whether that country, now the dominant power in the sea with a big appetite for seafood, will cooperate. For years, sovereign rights in the South China Sea have been an object of fierce contention among the states that border it: the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei, Indonesia and Vietnam (all members of the 10-nation ASEAN group), China, their giant neighbor to the north, and Taiwan as well. But while the bordering states jockey for advantage, with China now clearly the dominant local power, scientists have been warning that the sea is fast becoming the site of an environmental disaster, the impending collapse of one of the world’s most productive fisheries.Now a group of experts that includes geopolitical strategists as well as marine biologists is calling on the disputing parties to come together to manage and protect the sea’s fish stocks and marine environment. All can do so, the experts argue, without compromising their territorial claims. The success of any management scheme hinges on China’s whole-hearted participation, but it remains unclear whether that country, a major power with a big appetite for seafood, will cooperate.“In the South China Sea, fish may spawn in one nation’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ), live as juveniles in another’s, and spend most of their adult lives in a third. Overfishing or environmental destruction at any point in the chain affects all those who live around the sea,” the experts wrote this fall in a brief outlining their recommendations. “The entire South China Sea is teetering on the edge of a fisheries collapse, and the only way to avoid it is through multilateral cooperation in disputed waters.”A Malaysian navy pier on Layang Layang Atoll in the disputed Spratly Islands of the South China Sea. Photo courtesy of Greg Asner / Divephoto.org.“Steady catches mask a serious problem” The South China Sea, SCS for short, is a broad, semi-enclosed expanse, half again larger than the Mediterranean, and no less strategically important. More than half the fishing vessels in the world operate in the SCS, and in recent years, it has regularly produced about 12 percent of the global fish catch.But this regularity is deceptive. “Steady catches mask a serious problem,” U.S. Air Force area specialist Adam Greer wrote in the Diplomat last year. The amount of effort required to sustain production has risen sharply, and “catches increasingly consist of smaller species whose populations have boomed as natural predators have been overfished — a phenomenon commonly referred to as ‘fishing down the food web.’” A report led by University of British Columbia professors Rashid Sumaila and William Cheung concluded that biomass in the SCS has been fished down to between 5 and 30 percent of its 1950 level, and that perhaps 40 percent of the total catch is either illegal or simply unreported.The five ­­ASEAN member states bordering the sea have staked claims to exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in accordance with rules laid down in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) that came into force in 1994. These claims overlap where neighboring nations have different ideas about where to draw their baselines, but most observers agree that they shouldn’t be too hard to sort out should the need arise. China’s claim, by contrast, is legally intractable.Map shows South China Sea, including occupied islands by country. (Unoccupied islands not shown.) Map courtesy of CSIS Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative.UNCLOS, which China ratified, says China can claim only an EEZ off its southern coast extending halfway to Vietnam and the Philippine archipelago. Instead, Beijing claims that all the islands, rocks and reefs of the South China Sea have been “China’s historical territory since ancient times.”In 1974, Chinese forces wrested control of the Paracel Islands from a South Vietnamese garrison. Subsequently, China occupied a number of reefs in the Spratly Islands adjacent to islands and reefs already occupied by Vietnamese and Philippine detachments. When Chinese Coast Guard vessels chased Filipino fishermen from Scarborough Shoal, a rich fishery about 200 km (124 miles) west of Luzon, the main island of the Philippine archipelago, Manila’s patience was exhausted. It appealed to the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea in the Hague. When the tribunal ruled against China in July 2016, calling its extensive SCS claim incompatible with international law, China’s vice foreign minister, Liu Zhenmin, called the ruling “nothing more than a piece of waste paper” that “will not be enforced by anyone.”In addition to dismissing China’s “historic use” argument, the tribunal also ruled that the activities of China’s fishing fleet flouted UNCLOS injunctions to cooperate with neighbors in protecting fragile ecosystems and managing fisheries. Although Chinese Coast Guard vessels have attacked foreign fishing vessels near islands it contends are its own, China has seemed less dismissive of this part of the tribunal’s ruling. This has heartened marine biologists with decades of experience studying changes in South China Sea ecosystems, who reason that China has as much to lose as any other of the claimant states from continued free-for-all competition over dwindling resources. On that they hang a hope: that China, now strongly implanted at least as far south as the artificial islands it has built in the disputed Spratly Islands, will choose to cooperate in managing SCS fish stocks sustainably.A Vietnamese fishing boat on the South China Sea. Photo by Jean-Pierre Bluteau via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).“Join … or we’ll eat everything”Meetings sponsored this summer by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, D.C., brought more than two-dozen participants together to explore the dilemma. They came from the U.S., the Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia, Australia, Canada, Vietnam, and Taiwan. Chinese experts were not invited because, meeting coordinator Gregory Poling of CSIS told Mongabay, “it is difficult these days to find Chinese experts willing to call publicly for compromise on the South China Sea. At the end of the day, the goals of including a member from every claimant … and of giving ourselves the best chance of reaching consensus on a robust final product were at odds.”Participants focused on how to induce China to work with other claimant states to limit the annual catch of fast-declining stocks of tuna, halibut, mackerel, grouper, and other prized species, and to protect dozens of reefs that supply larval fish to coastal fisheries. In September they published their recommendations online as “A Blueprint for Fisheries Management and Environmental Cooperation in the South China Sea.” Explicit in the Blueprint is the notion that all claimants must cooperate for management and protection to be effective, and that they can do so without compromising their territorial claims. Implicit in it is recognition that China must step up to lead such an effort.China’s posture is pivotal because of the sheer size and industrial scale of its fishing fleet, which, as China’s coastal fisheries have been depleted, has ranged deeply into waters traditionally fished by other SCS states. Moreover, China has established bases in the Paracel and Spratly archipelagos (the latter on the carcasses of seven reefs it destroyed for the purpose), which greatly extend the range of its naval and paramilitary forces.China’s posture is also problematic because marine environmental protection, particularly multilateral efforts, have to date been a low priority in the SCS, ranking far behind unilateral measures aimed at dominating the sea militarily and winning control of its resources, which include oil and gas fields as well as open ocean and reef fisheries.China’s ritual assertion of “indisputable sovereignty over the islands of the South China Sea, and the adjacent waters” is a formulation associated with Mao Zedong’s reformist successor, Deng Xiaoping, who frequently coupled it with a call for “joint development” of SCS resources. However, although the ASEAN group has aimed at collective agreements that include all SCS claimants, China has shown a decided preference for unilateral action or for one-on-one pacts, arrangements that if concluded it can easily dominate. Its annual proclamation of a fishing moratorium in the northern half of the SCS is a good example of this strategy.“China is in effect holding a gun to the head of the Southeast Asia fishing industry, saying either join our fish management arrangements or we’ll eat everything,” Bill Hayton, author of The South China Sea: The Struggle for Power in Asia, told Mongabay.A green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) in the Spratly Islands of the South China Sea. Photo courtesy of Greg Asner / Divephoto.org.“This sea is a bit like a large bowl of soup” And yet, this may change. Specialists argue that unilateral Chinese efforts to enforce its annual three-month ban on fishing are doomed. They say the proscribed area is too vast for China to patrol effectively. Further, Beijing’s edicts inspire the Philippines, Vietnam and Taiwan to urge their fishermen to defy them. For these countries, doing less would be tantamount to recognizing Chinese sovereignty over areas they claim as EEZ in conformity with UNCLOS rules.John McManus, a marine ecologist at the University of Miami who coauthored the Blueprint, told Mongabay that to police the fish-rich areas of the expanse it claims, China would need to deploy ”an enormous enforcement fleet at tremendous expense both in terms of money and in terms of a loss of global respect — something which runs directly counter to what China is trying to achieve.”Lina Gong, a security researcher at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore with close ties to Chinese academics, argues that Beijing has recognized that “Chinese fishermen tend to overfish” and is moving to bring the activities of its fishing fleet under tighter control. In 2015 China reportedly accounted for 18 percent of the total world ocean catch. McManus told Mongabay he is heartened by a Chinese promise to “cut back substantially on the size of its SCS fishing fleet, which would be a major step toward sustainability.”Not just in the CSIS Blueprint but also in policy papers and at conferences this autumn in England and Taiwan, a range of experts have been delivering a consistent message to policy-makers: fisheries management, with effective policing, can’t wait for rival states to agree on who owns what in the SCS. Instead, they say, China and its ASEAN neighbors must soon set up some sort of regional fisheries management organization. Failing that, fish stocks, already severely stressed, will crash and take decades to recover.“This sea is a bit like a large bowl of soup with at least six nations each sipping through straws. If one nation sips slowly, the others will take up the slack,” McManus said. “The only way to achieve sustainability is via cooperative agreement … China alone cannot do it. There is no reason to believe that they will oppose joining a new, more regionally focused fishery and environmental sustainability organization.”A manta ray in the South China Sea. Photo courtesy of Greg Asner / Divephoto.org.“A rules-based framework”Cooperative action including China is not a new idea. For two decades, ASEAN has sought to win China’s agreement to a Code of Conduct (COC) for the South China Sea. At last, in August 2017, the foreign ministers of China and the 10 ASEAN members endorsed a plan for substantive negotiations on a COC, with the first objective being “To establish a rules-based framework containing a set of norms to guide the conduct of parties and promote maritime cooperation in the South China Sea.” The agreement was hailed as a breakthrough, although Beijing once again gave no indication that it is prepared to accept binding constraints on its behavior.Neither maritime scientific research nor environmental protection is specifically mentioned in the one-page plan. However, these are believed to be among the activities subsumed under the catchall phrase “promotion of practical maritime cooperation,” according to an analysis of the plan by Singapore-based researcher Ian Storey,Assuming that’s so, the authors of the Blueprint seek to persuade ASEAN’s COC negotiators to aim high. “What we hoped to do is lay down a marker, to prove that it is possible to negotiate fair, legal and workable agreements,” said Poling of CSIS. “Our blueprint on fisheries and environmental cooperation … is detailed, entirely feasible, and in accordance with both international law and domestic law in the relevant countries.”As the ASEAN states begin what likely will be protracted wrangling over details of the long-elusive COC, the Blueprint’s authors hope the negotiators will give priority to agreement on a fisheries chapter with teeth. These include the creation of a collective fisheries management organization, agreement to set aside ecosystem-based fisheries zones covering remaining reefs vital to the health of regional fish stocks, and real resolve to fast track their implementation. Would China agree if, as the CSIS group hopes, ASEAN presses a proposal along these lines?In reply to Mongabay’s e-mail query, Nong Hong, director of the Institute for China-America Studies in Washington, D.C, was non-committal. The Blueprint, she said, “is not really something new. We (including scholars from China, Taiwan and other claimants) have been discussing fishery conservation and management issues for years.”Carl Thayer, an emeritus political scientist at the University of New South Wales in Australia, has tracked the ASEAN-China discussions on an SCS Code of Conduct for over two decades. Judging by Beijing’s past behavior, he said he doubts China’s sincerity, pointing to Beijing’s disregard for the UNCLOS Tribunal Award and its continual militarization of reefs and islands it occupies in the South China Sea.And yet, Thayer told Mongabay, the elements of an agreement are at hand. Beijing has achieved its goal of effective hegemony over the SCS expanse. It has ambitious plans for building infrastructure and alliances in Central Asia and the Indian Ocean region to implement president Xi Jinping’s “One Belt, One Road” concept. Continued bullying of China’s neighbors around the SCS puts other would-be development partners on guard. Common sense for China, Thayer pointed out, lies in the direction of striking an agreement with ASEAN on cooperation in the South China Sea that reflects current realities and its own interest, so it can move on.An underwater view of the reef at Layang Layang Atoll in the Spratly Islands, South China Sea. Photo courtesy of Greg Asner / Divephoto.org.David Brown, a retired American diplomat, is now a frequent writer on contemporary Vietnam and its neighborhood. His e-mail address is nworbd@gmail.com.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Indonesia unveils plan to halve forest fires by 2019

first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong Banner image: A peat swamp in Sumatra smolders during the 2015 haze crisis. The drainage canals were dug in order to prepare the land for planting with oil palm, but the practice renders the land vulnerable to catching fire. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Forestry, Forests, Indonesia, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests The Indonesian government has launched a plan to cut down land and forest fire hotspots by nearly half, in part by protecting peat forests.The program, which calls for $2.73 billion in funding, aims to ensure that 121,000 square kilometers of land, a fifth of it peat forest, will be fire-free by 2019.The move comes as the government anticipates drier weather conditions than usual next year in perennial hotspot regions like West Kalimantan. JAKARTA – The Indonesian government has unveiled an ambitious plan to nearly halve the number of fire hotspots in the country by 2019, in part through the restoration of degraded peat forests.The fires are an annual occurrence, linked to the clearing of forests for logging and monoculture plantations. In recent years the problem has been exacerbated by the draining of peat swamps, which leaves them highly combustible.Under the new plan revealed Tuesday by the Coordinating Ministry for the Economy, the government aims to tackle the fires through a two-pronged approach.First is ensuring that the 24,000 square kilometers (9,266 square miles) of degraded peat areas slated to be restored by Indonesia’s peatland restoration agency (BRG) are not burned. Second is boosting prevention efforts in 731 villages in Sumatra and Kalimantan, the Indonesian portion of Borneo, identified as being historically prone to fires.In all, the plan calls for the protection of 121,000 square kilometers (46,718 square miles) of land, which, if kept successfully free of fire by 2019, will reduce the anticipated number of hotspots by 49 percent compared to business-as-usual levels.Fire set for peatland clearing in Riau Province, Indonesia in July 2015. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerFive action plansBecause of its wide scope, the plan will involve multiple government agencies and require at least 39 trillion rupiah ($2.73 billion) in funding.It comprises five action plans, the first of which is to provide economic incentives and disincentives. Each of the fire-prone villages, for instance, will be eligible for 300 million rupiah ($21,000) in funding if it manages to prevent land and forest fires for a full year. Concession holders, meanwhile, risk the revocation of their permit if found liable for fires on their land.“This strategy is the most important [of all the strategies], in my opinion,” Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya said on the sidelines of the launch of the plan.The second action plan calls for empowering villagers and forest communities to prevent and tackle fires, while the third focuses on more stringent enforcement of existing laws and regulations on forest concessions.Improving water management in peat forests, exploring weather modification techniques and developing wind farms make up the infrastructure-oriented fourth action plan. The last one calls for upgrading fire monitoring systems, setting up a crisis center and early response system, and distributing fire-extinguishing equipment.Indonesia on fire, October 16, 2015. The fires there were blamed on a record El Nino drought that was intensified by climate change, along with forest clearance for industrial agriculture. An image posted on Twitter purporting to show the smoke-choked city of Palangkaraya.Dry weather aheadThe rollout of the plan comes as Indonesia’s weather agency, the BMKG, is predicting drier-than-usual conditions in parts of the country starting in May next year, as a result of the La Niña weather system.A similar phenomenon occurred in 2016, when the country experienced a longer-than-normal wet season. This time around, however, the prolonged rains from La Niña will only affect regions such as Sulawesi and Maluku, while provinces such as West Kalimantan, one of the main areas routinely stricken by fires, will see drier weather.“The region that needs special attention is West Kalimantan because the rainfall there is expected to be significantly lower than normal,” BMKG head Dwikorita Karnawati told reporters at the unveiling of the fire-prevention plan. “The region is relatively the driest compared to other regions.”Drier weather across Sumatra brought by El Niño in 2015 led to fires across huge swaths of land that generated some of the worst haze on record. Smoke from the fires sickened half a million Indonesians, per government estimates, and drifted into neighboring countries. At the height of the disaster, the daily emissions of carbon dioxide as a result of the burning exceeded those from all U.S. economic activity.In the wake of the disaster, the government has taken steps to prevent peat fires, including ordering the conservation of peat forests in existing plantation concessions. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Colombian land defenders: ‘They’re killing us one by one’

first_imgTheir fears are well-founded: Colombia is the second-most deadly place in the world for environmental leaders and land defenders.Rural resident leaders in the community of Carmen del Darien say that now their lives are under imminent threat because of their work to defend local land from palm oil and cattle ranching.In this intimate look into the lives and struggles of environmental activists and community members in Carmen del Darien, Mongabay reports from ground zero in the global grassroots battle to fend off the reach of powerful agribusiness interests. CARMEN DEL DARIEN, Colombia – Community leaders in Colombia’s western Chocó are calling on the government to provide security after receiving ongoing threats from individuals they accuse of working for local and national industrial agricultural business owners. They say those business interests are occupying and invading their land, and they refuse to stay silent despite recent violence in the area.In November and December 2017, two land defenders in nearby communities were allegedly killed by paramilitary hitmen within about ten days of each other: Mario Castaño and Hernan Bedoya.Following deaths of Castaño and Bedoya, representatives from the region traveled to the capital city of Bogotá this past December with the Colombian human rights group Inter-church Commission for Justice and Peace in Colombia (CIJP). Their aim was to denounce widely-circulated threats against other leading land defenders, much like a recent report co-published by The Guardian and Global Witness, part of an effort to document every single such murder around the world. The report noted that 32 environmental and land defenders were murdered in 2017 alone in Colombia, second only to Brazil.Particularly in western Chocó’s municipalities of Carmen del Darién and Riosucio, violent pressure of all kinds continue to increase.On January 28, the Colombian Ombudsman issued an early warning for the “imminent risk” posed to 32,000 people due to armed confrontation between ELN guerrilla and Gaitanista Self-Defense Forces (AGC), a neo-paramilitary group. The report said both illegal armed groups have taken advantage of the demobilization of the FARC guerrillas to consolidate territorial control in the region that is inhabited by six indigenous communities and 12 collective Afro-Colombian territories.Additionally, the report called on the military, police and local government entities to provide “protection mechanisms” for threatened community leaders in the region.According to CIPJ, cattle ranchers and palm oil and banana growers have counted on the support of the AGC to intimidate, threaten and kill the community leaders who are defending their land from the expansion of agribusiness and commercial logging interests in the region. Chocó is where almost half of all the forest cover loss in Colombia from mining activities happens.A representative of CIPJ who works in the area but asked not to be named for security reasons said that agribusiness concerns in the area are sending proxy growers into collective territory with the aim of invading land claimants’ farms. According to the CIPJ staffer, the goal is to “expand the agricultural frontier and extract wood” at the largely undeveloped entryway to the remote, roadless rainforests of the Darién Gap.Map of the Darién Gap and the break in the Pan-American Highway between Yaviza, Panama and Turbo, Colombia. Map by CMG Lee and OpenStreetMap contributors.The Darién Gap national park is a 60-mile stretch of  tropical rainforest, marshland and mountains that runs between Colombia and Panama. It is an unfinished gap in the Pan-American Highway that will someday connect North and South America.Security measuresBack in Carmen del Darién, Maria Chaverra is one of the names that the CIPJ and other members of the community have said was singled out as a target by paramilitary hitmen and industrial agriculturalists. At 67 years-old, Chaverra is an outspoken leader and advocate for the land rights of the displaced campesinos of Curvaradó. CIPJ refers to her as a “matriarch of the community.”As explained by her son Wilson Martinez, “There’s no one else like [Chaverra]…we go where the old woman tells us, we all respect her and follow her word.”last_img read more

ICC slams ‘disrespectful’ West Indies

first_imgDUBAI, United Arab Emirates (CMC):Cricket’s governing body, the International Cricket Council (ICC), blasted the West Indies cricket team for the behaviour of some of its players following the final of the Twenty20 World Cup in India earlier this month.In an unusual step yesterday, the ICC labelled the players’ behaviour as “inappropriate and disrespectful” and argued that it “brought the event into disrepute”.In a statement following a meeting of its board over the weekend, the ICC said it had even given “serious consideration” to bringing sanctions against the players.INAPPROPRIATE”The board considered the behaviour of some of the West Indies players in the immediate aftermath of the final and unanimously agreed that certain comments and actions were inappropriate, disrespectful, and brought the event into disrepute,” the governing body said.”The board acknowledged an apology by the WICB but was disappointed to note that such behaviour had detracted from the success of what was otherwise a magnificent tournament and final.”West Indies beat England by four wickets in a dramatic final over in Kolkata to win their second Twenty20 World Cup, following their triumph four years ago in Sri Lanka.Many of the Caribbean players celebrated wildly afterwards, with some removing their shirts as they danced in delight.West Indies captain Darren Sammy also stunned many by openly criticising the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) during the official post-game interview and highlighting the players’ ongoing pay dispute, which had marred the build-up to the tournament.Man-of-the-Match Marlon Samuels was also fined for his verbal tirade against bowler Ben Stokes during the final over of the game.While not specifying exactly what behaviour the ICC found offensive, the ICC chairman, Shashank Manohar, said the Windies players actions were not “acceptable conduct” for ICC events.”The sport of cricket is proud of its unique spirit and this involves being gracious in victory as well as defeat and respectful at all times to the game, one’s opponents, the sponsors and the fans,” Manohar said.”The Board also noted that very serious consideration had been given to bringing Code of Conduct charges in respect of the behaviour of the West Indies players and emphasised that this was not acceptable conduct at ICC events played out on a world stage in front of millions of people around the globe.”Following Sammy’s interview, WICB president Dave Cameron also tendered an apology for what the board deemed to be his “inappropriate” comments and promised to investigate.last_img read more

UPDATED: COLEMAN STARS AS IRELAND BEAT ITALY 2-0

first_imgIRELAND have beaten Italy 2-0 in Belgium last night in a friendly.And Killybegs sensation Seamus Coleman had a cracking game for Ireland.Keith Andrews scored a brilliant goal to put Ireland ahead nine minutes before the break and substitute Simon Cox made sure with a second in the final minute of normal time. Italy enjoyed most of the possession, but Ireland goalkeeper Mike Forde – standing in for Shay Given – had few saves of note to make on his first senior international start.And Coleman made some fantastic tackles and runs on the wing.He survived TWO crunching Italian tackles in the first few minutes as the Azzuri appeared to employ some shocking tactics.And just before half time – after Ireland had taken the lead – Coleman was able to lash a shot…though it was blocked by Italian defenders. The Killybegs man was back in the thick of it shortly after the break putting in a great tackle to Criscito sending the ball into the box. The Italy defender stayed down well after the tackle.A superb performance right through what is Ireland’s second team. And Donegal man Coleman was at the centre of it.Republic of Ireland: David Forde; Paul McShane, Darren O’Dea (Stephen Kelly, 83), Sean St. Ledger, Stephen Ward (Damien Delaney, 94); Seamus Coleman, Kevin Foley (Glenn Whelan, 60), Keith Andrews, Stephen Hunt, Andy Keogh (Keith Treacy, 75), Shane Long (Simon Cox, 60).Italy: Emiliano Viviano; Mattia Cassani, Alessandro Gamberini, Giorgio Chiellini, Domenico Criscito (Federico Balzaretti, 66); Antonio Nocerino (Sebastian Giovinco, 59), Andrea Pirlo (Angelo Palombo, 46), Claudio Marchisio, Riccardo Montolivo; Giuseppe Rossi (Alessandro Matri, 46), Giampaolo Pazzini (Alberto Gilardino, 59)UPDATED: COLEMAN STARS AS IRELAND BEAT ITALY 2-0 was last modified: June 8th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:2-0Irelanditalyseamus coleanseamus colemanlast_img read more