Videos unlock secrets of jellyfish as deep-sea killers

first_imgScientists have for the first time captured extensive visual documentation of deep-sea food webs using 27 years’ worth of video observations from remotely operated vehicles run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).The research greatly enhances scientists’ understanding of deep-sea food webs by documenting the importance of soft-bodied predators like jellyfish.Until now, our understanding of food webs in the deep ocean have been limited by what can be captured by net and whose bodies survive a journey to the survey. Video footage of a Gonatus squid feeding on a bathylagid fish. © of MBARIScientists have for the first time captured extensive visual documentation of predation events that underpin deep-sea food webs. The research, which relies on hundreds of video observations captured over nearly three decades by deep-diving remotely operated vehicles run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), reveals the importance of deep-sea jellies in these ecosystems as major predators and sources of sustenance.Until now, our understanding of food webs in the deep ocean have been limited by what species can be captured by net and whose bodies can survive a journey to the surface. That meant soft-bodied, gelatinous animals like jellyfish have been greatly underrepresented using traditional surveying techniques. MBARI’s approach enabled researchers Anela Choy, Steven Haddock, and Bruce Robison to capture deep-sea predators in the act of feeding, offering new insight into predator-prey relationships at depths up to nearly 4,000 meters (13,000 feet) off the California coast.“This direct approach has never been used systematically before,” Robison said in a statement. “Unlike other methods, it involves no guesswork and provides very precise information about who eats whom in the deep sea.”ROV frame grabs of pelagic predators and their prey from Choy et al (2017). (a) Gonatus squid feeding on a bathylagid fish (Bathylagidae). (b) Periphylla periphylla, the helmet jellyfish, feeding on a gonatid squid (Gonatidae), with a small narcomedusa (Aegina sp.) also captured. Images © MBARI; caption adapted from Choy et al (2017).The research, which is published in the December 6th issue of the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, identified 84 different predators and 82 different prey types across almost 750 different video observations of predation events. Soft-bodies animals Ô medusae, ctenophores and siphonophores — consumed the greatest diversity of prey, outpacing cephalopods like squid.“The most surprising thing to me was how important gelatinous animals were as predators, and how their unexpectedly complex food habits spanned the entire food web. Who would have thought that a deep-sea jelly that looks like a big dinner plate would eat 22 different types of animals?” lead author Anela Choy, a MBARI Postdoctoral Fellow, said via a news release. “Our video footage shows that jellies are definitely not the dietary ‘dead ends’ we once thought. As key predators, they could have just as much impact as large fishes and squids in the deep sea!”ROV frame grabs of pelagic predators and their prey from Choy et al (2017). (d) A narcomedusa, Solmissus, ingesting a salp chain (Salpida). (e) The ctenophore Thalassocalyce inconstans, with a euphausiid (Euphausiacea) in its gut. Images © MBARI; caption adapted from Choy et al (2017).ROV frame grabs of pelagic predators and their prey from Choy et al (2017). (c) Images from an undescribed physonect siphonophore known as ‘the galaxy siphonophore’ feeding on a lanternfish of the family Myctophidae. (f) The trachymedusa, Halitrephes maasi, with a large, red mysid (Mysidae) in its gut. Images © MBARI; caption adapted from Choy et al (2017).The findings show that jellies play a critical role in deep-sea ecosystems, added Haddock.“There is a misconception that jellies are merely a nuisance and serve no real purpose in marine ecosystems,” he said in a statement. “Our results and other studies around the world show that they are a common source of food for a diverse group of predators. Interactions involving gelatinous predators and prey create most of the complexity that we see in our new deep-sea food web.”Counts and depth distributions of 718 pelagic feeding observations categorized into nine different broad animal groupings, made by ROVs within the study ecosystem between the years 1991 and 2016. (a) Prey and (b) predator identities and depth distributions illustrate the depth distributions and general animal identities of the feeding interactions presented throughout Choy et al (2017).Citation:Choy, C.A., Haddock, S.H.D. Robison, B.H. (2017). Deep pelagic food web structure as revealed by in situ feeding observations. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 284: 20172116, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2017.2116 (6 December 2017) Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Archive, Deep Sea, Ecology, Fish, Jellyfish, Oceans, Strange, Wildlife center_img Article published by Rhett Butlerlast_img read more

Study reveals forests have yet another climate-protection superpower

first_imgScientists looked at reactive gases emitted by trees and other vegetation, finding they have an overall cooling effect on the atmosphere globally.As forests are cleared, emissions of these cooling reactive gases are reduced. The researchers estimate the loss of this function this may contribute 14 percent towards deforestation-caused global warming.The authors write that effective climate policies will require a “robust understanding” of the relationship between land-use change like deforestation and climate, and urge more research be done toward this goal. As big carbon storehouses, forests have the power to influence the climate. So much so that the protection and expansion of forests is a key part of the Paris Agreement, which seeks to lower greenhouse gas emissions and stave off the worst effects of global warming.A new study, published last week in Nature Communications, finds forests may have an even bigger cooling effect on climate than we thought. And that without them, the world may be heating up more quickly than expected.Living vegetation emits gases that can react and combine with other gases in the atmosphere. Some of these, called biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), affect the formation of other compounds like aerosol, ozone and methane, the presence of which can influence atmospheric temperature.For their study, an international team of researchers led by the University of Leeds in the UK looked at these reactive compounds to see what kind of a temperature changes they induce. To do this, they simulated boreal, temperate and tropical forest conditions and calculated different warming and cooling effects through computer modeling.They discovered that while trees emit gases that can warm the atmosphere (e.g., they can increase the formation of ozone and methane), gases that had a cooling effect had a greater overall impact.“We found that the cooling impacts of these gases outweigh the warming impacts, meaning that reactive gases given out by forests have an overall cooling effect on our climate,” said study coauthor Dominick Spracklen, a professor at the University of Leeds.A kapok tree bursts into bloom in the Amazon rainforest. The study found warming and cooling effects related to the emissions of reactive gases is most closely balanced in tropical forests compared to temperate and boreal forests.As forests are cleared, emissions of these cooling reactive gases are reduced. The researchers estimate the loss of this function this may contribute 14 percent towards deforestation-caused global warming.According to the researchers, this study is the first thorough analysis of the climatic impact of non-CO2 reactive gases emitted by forests and how it’s affected by human-caused land-use change.“Most previous assessments on the climate impacts of deforestation have focused on the amount of carbon dioxide that would be emitted, or changes to the way the land-surface exchanges energy and water with the atmosphere,” said lead author Catherine Scott of the University of Leeds. “But as well as taking in carbon dioxide and giving out oxygen, trees emit other gases that take part in complicated chemical reactions in the atmosphere and there are implications for reducing these gases.”The scientists write that effective climate policies will require a “robust understanding” of the relationship between land-use change like deforestation and climate, and urge more research be done toward this goal.“By understanding these complex effects we now know more about how forests are affecting our climate, and we are able to see a clearer picture of the repercussions of deforestation,” Scott said. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored boreal forests, carbon, Carbon Sequestration, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Politics, Environment, Gas, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Rainforests, Research, Temperate Forests, Trees, Tropical Forests Citation:Scott, C. E., Monks, S. A., Spracklen, D. V., Arnold, S. R., Forster, P. M., Rap, A., … & Ehn, M. (2018). Impact on short-lived climate forcers increases projected warming due to deforestation. Nature Communications, 9(1), 157.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

‘Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise’ film shows how farmers are fighting climate change

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Food, Education, Environment, Extreme Weather, Film, Flooding, Green, Oceans, Overpopulation, Population Article published by Shreya Dasgupta A recent documentary looks at how Bangladeshi farmers are adapting to rising sea levels.The film documents how Bangladeshi farmers are keeping their farms from flooding by building floating gardens made of water hyacinth and bamboo.The film won the Best Short Film at the New York WILD Film Festival, which begins on Feb. 22.Mongabay interviewed cultural anthropologist Alizé Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important. This is a story of hope.Bangladesh is extremely vulnerable to climate change. Threatened by rising sea levels, storms and cyclones, floods have become commonplace, with seawater encroaching both homes and agricultural farms. But Bangladeshi people have found ingenious ways of adapting to the rising sea level. A recent documentary, “Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise,” explores one such example of resilience.To keep their farms from flooding, Bangladeshi farmers have been building floating gardens — farms made of water hyacinth and bamboo that float on water, no matter what the water level. These floating gardens help the people “fish, raise ducks, and grow produce,” Alizé Carrère, a cultural anthropologist and National Geographic explorer, told National Geographic in 2016.“Adaptation Bangladesh,” featuring Carrère and directed by documentary filmmaker Justin DeShields, looks not only at simple floating farms that farmers have traditionally used in flood-prone areas, but also explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries, and even high-tech floating farms that could potentially provide food for entire cities. For Carrère, it was important to document these “slices of hope.”“So while I sometimes wonder if people will criticize these stories as futile or inaccurate portrayals given what’s coming down the pike, I have to remind myself that those small narratives (and practices) of resilience are all that we have left,” she told Mountain film education. “And frankly, most of what we’ve used so far to push people to action on climate change are doomsday narratives, which clearly haven’t been working. So why not try a new, more uplifting narrative and see where it brings us?”“Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise” won the Best Short Film award at the New York WILD Film Festival, held at the Explorers Club in Manhattan, which began Feb. 22 (watch the trailer here).Mongabay interviewed Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important.Buoyant fields made of plants and manure can support crops in Bangladesh. Carrère (at right) toured several with Bangladeshi reporter Tania Rashid. Photo by Katia Nicolova.Mongabay: What makes Bangladesh a good location for a film about climate change and rising sea levels?Alizé Carrère: Bangladesh is one of the most climate vulnerable countries in the world, for a multitude of reasons. To begin with, it’s a giant river delta. Bangladesh sits at the confluence of the Ganges, Jamuna and Meghna rivers, so it’s flat and extremely wet. Any fluctuation in sea level rise or monsoon patterns dramatically impacts the population, many of whom live on or near the water. It’s also the most densely populated country on our planet — more than 160 million people live in a landmass the size of Wisconsin. That’s staggering. When you have that many people living so close together, and when the environment is so susceptible to minor fluctuations in water levels, you end up with a highly vulnerable population. On top of that it is also a very impoverished country, so the alternatives for most people are limited once flooding occurs.How did you come to look at climate adaptation efforts in Bangladesh, and how did the film come about?I actually learned about the floating gardens of Bangladesh in college, when I took a geography course at McGill University. I was fascinated by the concept: if you could build gardens that float, then you’re not beholden to your environment. Regardless of what the water level is, your farm stays afloat, continuing to provide food even during the wettest months of the year (when all fields are under water). I loved this idea, and started finding other examples of resilience and practical design in the face of change. Once I started collecting these stories, it gave rise to the idea of making a series. We started with the case study in Bangladesh.Whereas we normally hear a lot of doom and gloom about climate change, Adaptation Bangladesh seems to strike something of a hopeful note by focusing on the ways farmers are attempting to cope with sea level rise. What are some of the key adaptations you feature in the film?The film looks at four different adaptive designs as it relates to sea level rise and erratic monsoon patterns: traditional floating farms made of extremely simple materials (all organic plants), more advanced floating farms made with recycled materials, floating school boats and libraries, and finally, large-scale, high-tech floating farms out in the ocean that could provide food for entire cities.In your time with them, how hopeful did these farmers seem that they could adapt to climate change and even perhaps continue to thrive in a warming world?That’s a tough question, and I think it changes depending on where you are and who you’re talking to. Bangladeshis have always lived with, on and around water, and therefore constantly adjust to it. To be surrounded by water demands, in some way, that you always stay present. You can’t project too far into the future about the way things will be, because water is incredibly fickle and may be one way today and completely different tomorrow. And when that’s your dominant landscape feature, you get pretty good at, quite literally, going with the flow. From our conversations, and from what I saw, this seemed to be the prevailing attitude. That’s not to say there isn’t suffering and difficulty with that reality, but it’s more of a take-each-day-as-it-comes mentality.Bangladeshi farmers use floating farms to grow food. Photo by Katia Nicolova.These farmers must still be facing significant challenges. Which of those challenges seemed most daunting to you?Population growth. I can’t put into words how intense it is to be immersed in such a densely inhabited area such as Dhaka, the capital city. I had never seen anything like it. You can be the most sustainable population in the world, but when there’s 160 million of you – and the land on which you live is disappearing before your very eyes – it’s not easy. Population growth is something we have to start thinking about more seriously in general, somehow it seems like the climate change conversation has taken over the population conversation in the last two decades. I don’t have the answer to it, but I do think we underestimate the power of educating girls and young women. When they have agency in their own lives, it creates a trickle-down effect and results in healthier decision-making for themselves and their families.There is obvious value in telling these farmers’ stories, but what do you hope this film can achieve in a broader sense? What are the main takeaways for people who maybe don’t live in an area subject to such severe sea level rise?I always say that adaptation is more of a mindset than it is a practice. To me, this project is about waking up the part of ourselves that has allowed us to exist for as long as we have in the first place – and that’s our ability to be resilient and adaptive in our thinking. Most of my work is looking at the positive, but truthfully, the most depressing part is that those of us living in relative comfort and stability are the least adaptable of all! It gets back to the old adage, “necessity is the mother of invention.” There’s something about people who have nothing between them and environmental change that we can all learn from, and my goal with this series is to start bringing those lessons of creativity into classrooms so that young minds can start thinking differently for our future. We will not solve our present-day issues with traditional, linear approaches. I do a lot of work in schools and with educators, and it’s amazing to see how kids absorb this content. They are so much better at it than adults – they have no limits to their imagination, and that’s exactly what we need.What are the distribution plans for the film? When and where can the public see it?We’re still working on that right now, but in the meantime I’m working on putting together a website. Ultimately this project is more than just the series. With the help of an educational consultant, we’re starting to design curriculum around each case study, so that any student, teacher or citizen can go to the site, watch the episodes, and then download educational content if they want to dive deeper into the issues. I’m hoping to have this up by the end of the year.This film is part of a series, correct? What’s coming next?Yes, that’s right. It’s a 6-part series that looks at 6 distinct case studies around the world where we see people innovatively adapting to landscape changes. I’ve been following these different case studies/communities for the last few years now, and will be heading to Vanuatu for the month of May as the next installment. I don’t want to reveal too many details, but it has to do with starfish compost!Large farms made of water hyacinth keep the farms afloat and safe from floods. Photo by Katia Nicolova.The film explores not just traditional floating farms but explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries. Photo by Andy Maser.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

‘Photo Ark’ a quest to document global biodiversity: Q&A with photographer Joel Sartore and director Chun-Wei Yi

first_img Amphibians, Animals, Beetles, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Birds, Cats, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Ecosystem Services, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Film, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Insects, Interviews, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Orangutans, Parks, Photography, Primates, Rainforests, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sixth Mass Extinction, Species, Tigers, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Zoos Mongabay: How long have you been working on the Photo Ark, and what was the original impetus behind the project?Joel Sartore: I started about 12 years ago. My wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. Though she’s fine now, her treatment took about a year, and I stayed home to take care of her and our three young children. During my time at home, I began to think more and more about what I might do with the second half of my life and career in order to make a difference. That’s how the Ark got started, and I’ve been going at it ever since.How did you first hear about Joel’s work and the Photo Ark? What made you decide to feature his work as the subject of a documentary?Chun-Wei Yi: I met Joel back in 2006 or 2007 through Stella Cha [the film’s producer and writer] during my early days at National Geographic Television & Film. This was soon after he had started what was to become the Photo Ark (with a naked mole rat), and I was immediately blown away by what kind of impact eye contact with an animal could have on someone. Stella and Joel had already made a bunch of films together and were longtime colleagues with [executive producer] John Bredar. With Joel’s humor and passion driving the story, John had always thought that a behind-the-scenes look at these intimate portraits would be hilariously revealing.Fast forward to 2013, Joel now had over 3,000 species in the Photo Ark, and I helped him produce and edit a video about his latest work. Once John saw it, he had a pitch tape to send to commissioners. It took a few years, but we eventually found ourselves in eight different countries filming some of the rarest animals in the world, a couple with population counts in the single digits.Three yearling Burmese star tortoises (Geochelone platynota), a critically endangered species, at the Turtle Conservancy, taken for the National Geographic Photo Ark. © Photo by Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark.What was it like traveling to all these different locations to film Joel as he took photos of endangered animals? Did any of the locations present significant obstacles to filming due to remoteness or ruggedness of terrain, etc.?Yi: The scientists and rangers on the front lines of conservation put in an unimaginable amount of work day after day in some of the harshest conditions in the world. We wanted audiences to get a taste of that, and what better way to do that than to put Joel in harm’s way. I’m only half joking, but really, Joel’s up for anything that’ll get species the attention they need and deserve.The trips we made to New Zealand and Cameroon required a fair bit of hiking. Now, hiking with 25-40 pounds [11-18 kilograms] of gear is one thing. Hiking while filming with 25-40 pounds of gear is another. To give a sense of the ruggedness in Cameroon, we hiked over 40 kilometers [25 miles] in three days, which at first doesn’t sound like a lot, but when you factor in over 3,000 feet [914 meters] of total elevation changes, up and down thick forest mountains and valleys that gorillas prefer, your already-deep appreciation for the cinematographer, Erin Harvey, and sound recordist, Rodrigo Salvatierra, grows exponentially. Last but not least, our support crew of warm and friendly porters made everything possible.And in New Zealand, a protected forest is a dense forest. So during a trek with a biologist looking for a rare kiwi nest, even though the hike was less than a mile long, it took over six hours to cover it … and you too can suffer through this hike with Joel all throughout the third and last episode!You photograph your 5,000th species in the course of the film, a Persian leopard in Budapest. Are all 5,000 species endangered?Sartore: We photograph all species, great and small, rare or common. The goal is to show what biodiversity looks like at this point in time. We’re nearing 8,000 species photographed now, by the way.You also photographed one of the rarest species of rhinoceros in the world, the northern white rhino, in the Czech Republic. What’s it like to encounter so many endangered animals? I imagine you must eventually wish you could do more than just photograph them.Sartore: You bet, I wish I could save them all, and that’s what I’m trying to do through the Photo Ark. It’s humbling and a big responsibility to tell the story of these animals before they leave us. I’m determined to do it as well as I can in order to prevent further extinction.How do you go about finding them?Sartore: I approach the zoos, aquariums, wildlife rehab centers and private breeders wherever I’m going to speak. I also target specific places housing species that I’ve been hoping to get.After a photo shoot for the National Geographic Photo Ark at the Columbus Zoo in Ohio, a clouded leopard cub (Neofelis nebulosa) climbs on Joel Sartore’s head. The leopards, which live in Asian tropical forests, are illegally hunted for their spotted pelts. © Photo by GRAHM S. JONES, COLUMBUS ZOO AND AQUARIUM.Have you prioritized certain endangered animals over others, or are you just systematically trying to photograph them all?Sartore: I do look for extremely rare animals, hoping to get to them before they’re not found in human care anymore.Do you have any favorites?Sartore: The next one.Do you have any favorite moments in the film?Yi: It’s always fun to watch Joel at his best. A perfect example of this is from the very beginning of the second episode where Joel drops to his knees near the end of an unsuccessful 10-hour hike in the highlands of Cameroon. He’s tagging along with Wildlife Conservation Society [WCS] scientists who study the Cross River gorilla, and unlike Joel, they do this hike every day.Since their 4 a.m. start time, the team hasn’t seen any of the world’s rarest gorillas and Joel hasn’t shot a single frame either. We’re rolling on him and figure we’re getting more funny “exhausted Joel” footage, but we soon realize he’s not capitulating. Rather, he’s digging through a fresh pile of cow dung!I’ve never seen anyone more excited about poop. As he peels back each moist lump, we see the gold he’s after: dung beetles. A herd of cattle have infiltrated the gorilla sanctuary, and from within this cow pie about the size of a personal pan pizza, he pulls out four new species of dung beetle to add to the Photo Ark.All I could think was, “This guy knows how to get a picture.” He’s always figuring out different ways to show people how our planet works and the animals with which we share it. After witnessing scenes like that, you really begin to understand how this guy has built his Photo Ark to over 7,000 species. Just when I thought he was too exhausted to go on, he was really just getting started and went on to photograph those dung beetles late into the night back at camp by generator. I think he even returned those beetles to a dung pile. I’m not too sure — I was asleep by then.A Fiji Island banded iguana (Brachylophus fasciatus) at the Los Angeles Zoo, taken for the National Geographic Photo Ark. © Photo by Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark.How does it feel to have the project documented in film? Will it help raise the profile of these endangered species even further?Sartore: Yes, the more coverage the better. This is a public awareness campaign that will span many decades. We need to make folks aware that all species need our empathy and our support. And they need habitat to survive as well. That’s critical. We must leave some areas of the Earth alone so that species can thrive in those places.The best part is that when we save other species, we’re actually saving ourselves as well. We need bees and other pollinating insects to bring us fruits and vegetables. We need healthy, intact rainforests to regulate rainfall around the planet, the moisture we need to grow our crops. These ecological functions are crucial to human survival. The sooner all of us realize that, the sooner we can start to save nature, and ourselves in the process.In the end, what is the main story you’re trying to tell here? And what do you hope your documentary can achieve?Yi: We wanted to tackle a word that many of us may find boring: biodiversity. We may turn off at its mention, but Joel taught me a great analogy early on — that our planet is like a plane and all the species in the world are like the rivets keeping the plane intact and flying. Now you lose a few of those rivets and the plane’s OK — we’re still flying. But you lose enough of them or lose ones in critical places, and the plane’s going down with us in it. To extend this analogy a little bit further, we’re not just passive passengers. In fact, each one of us helps run the airline company, so the integrity of the plane (or planet) is on us.Like Joel says about his pictures, we’re hoping to get people to care about these animals while we still have time to save them. If we can get folks to look at an animal differently, see the value in them and their direct role in our lives, then we’re getting the idea and importance of biodiversity across.Awareness is also a goal. If folks Google something about a species or come away with a new favorite animal after watching these shows, the necessary global awareness is growing and that’s progress. And if a kid watching Joel or the scientists in our films realizes that she wants to do the same with her life, that’s great bonus points.A pair of red wolves (Canis rufus gregoryi) at the Great Plains Zoo in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, taken for the National Geographic Photo Ark. © Photo by Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark.Have you seen any impacts from your photography?Sartore: The Florida grasshopper sparrow got extra protection (extra funding) from the federal government after Photo Ark coverage turned into an Audubon magazine cover story. But overall the goal is to raise public awareness, get people to realize that there are many other amazing species that we share the planet with and that the future of life on Earth really is in our hands now.When and where can the public see the film? What are your distribution plans for the film after the festival?Yi: The three films aired on PBS over the summer of 2017. It’s currently streaming on PBS and Amazon Prime now, and [it’s] available on DVD or Blu-Ray as well.We’ve been talking with National Geographic about the possibility of making a new season, so we will have to see if that could come together. If so, viewers would get to travel around the world with Joel again, meet more amazing species and the scientists dedicated to saving them and see what other lengths Joel will go to get a photo!Editor’s note: this interview has been edited  for style and length.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannon The film “RARE: Creatures of the Photo Ark” follows National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore as he travels the world snapping pictures of thousands of different animal species.In the last 12 years, Sartore has photographed nearly 8,000 species.“RARE: Creatures of the Photo Ark” was named Best Conservation Film at the New York WILD Film Festival. At turns haunting, humorous or just downright bizarre, the studio portraits of the thousands of animal species that photographer Joel Sartore has collected are more than just a catalog of life on Earth. When someone sees one of his photographs for the National Geographic Photo Ark, Sartore wants the encounter, often with an animal looking directly into the camera’s lens, to be inspiring.A recent three-part film documents the lengths to which he’ll go to take the most compelling images and showcase our planet’s biodiversity. “RARE: Creatures of the Photo Ark” follows Sartore through jungle treks and sittings with ornery birds, and the filmmakers will be honored Thursday for Best Conservation Film at the New York WILD Film Festival, held at the Explorers Club in Manhattan.An endangered Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni) at Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, in Nebraska, taken for the National Geographic Photo Ark. © Photo by Joel Sartore/National Geographic Photo Ark.Sartore isn’t picky about the species he photographs. He’s trained his lens on raccoons and dung beetles as eagerly as he has on critically endangered orangutans and rhinos. But there’s a sense of urgency with the rarer animals. Yes, it’s an image for posterity, a snapshot of life as it exists at this moment in time before some of these animals disappear forever. But Sartore also knows that it might just be the push that someone needs to make a difference.“I want people to care, to fall in love, and to take action,” Sartore says on the project’s website.To his mind, the global extinction crisis isn’t just about the potential loss of a species. It’s an issue that affects us all.“It’s folly to think that we can drive half of everything else to extinction, but that people will be just fine,” Sartore says in the opening moments of the film.Sartore and director Chun-Wei Yi spoke to Mongabay about making the documentary, sharing stories from the field and explaining why the Photo Ark project is so important. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

How loopholes in Indonesia’s corruption law let environmental crime persist

first_imgIn the leadup to the release of the second installment of Indonesia for Sale, our series examining the corruption behind Indonesia’s deforestation and land-rights crisis, we are republishing the first article in the series, “The Palm Oil Fiefdom.” This is the fifth part of that article. The first part described a secret deal between the son of Darwan Ali, head of Indonesia’s Seruyan district, and Arif Rachmat, CEO of one of Indonesia’s largest palm oil companies. The second part gave Darwan’s backstory, and the third part chronicled the palm oil boom that hit Seruyan after he took office. The fourth part examined the corruption behind that boom. The fifth part focused on Seruyan’s people as they organized against Darwan. The article can be read in full here.Indonesia for Sale is co-produced with The Gecko Project, an initiative of the UK-based investigations house Earthsight.The cover image for ‘The Palm Oil Fiefdom.’To the handful of observers who were aware of what Darwan had done, it was clear that he had abused his office to make money for his family, while inflicting considerable harm on the people he was elected to serve. The KPK investigators circled around the case for years, so why didn’t they pounce?The investigators involved, who have all since left the agency, were either unwilling or unable to comment for this article. We sought answers through interviews with current KPK officials, NGOs and academics focusing on anticorruption efforts in Indonesia, and our own research on other KPK cases.The easiest way to prosecute a corrupt official under Indonesian law is to catch them redhanded accepting a bribe, usually after tapping their phone, which the KPK can do without a warrant. In 2012, the agency intercepted a payment to a bupati on the island of Sulawesi. The money came from a businesswoman seeking an oil palm permit. She initially claimed it was a “donation,” and then that she had been extorted.Both the bupati and the businesswoman were imprisoned, but it is one of the very few licensing rackets the KPK has prosecuted. Tama Langkun, a researcher from Indonesia Corruption Watch (ICW), a Jakarta-based NGO that helped Nordin Abah pursue Darwan, drew a comparison with Seruyan. “In my view it’s the same,” he told us. “The difference is that [in Sulawesi] they caught them in the act.”Tama Langkun, left, and Lais Abid, researchers with Indonesia Corruption Watch.Seruyan involved a more complex ruse. Rather than demand cash in exchange for permits, Darwan’s friends and relatives created shell companies that served as vehicles for making money from oil palm firms. This avoided the more obvious offense of bribery. But Indonesian law includes a broader definition of corruption, provided the case can fulfill three criteria. Firstly, the suspect must have abused their power. Secondly, they must have done so with the intention of “enriching” themselves or someone else. Thirdly, they must have caused “state losses,” meaning a monetary cost to the government can be determined.It seemed self-evident that Darwan had acted with the aim of enriching his family and cronies. They had made more than a million dollars up front from permits he provided them. Similarly, there seemed to be a strong case he had abused his power. The permits Triputra bought from his son were a case in point; there is evidence they may have violated a range of laws during the course of their operations, as a consequence of Darwan’s light-touch regulatory regime.The third criterion, state losses, may have proved a sticking point. When it comes to skimming money from budgets or contracts, it is easy to calculate the drain on public coffers. Indeed, it is just this sort of crime for which most bupatis are arrested. On the other hand, losses arising from the crooked issuance of a permit to log a forest, plant oil palm or mine coal are harder to measure. If the companies pay taxes, there is no obvious cost to the state. “This is the basic problem of why the number of natural resource corruption cases processed by Indonesian law enforcement is so small,” said Lais Abid, another ICW researcher.There was another obstacle to prosecution unrelated to the law. Overstretched and understaffed, the KPK’s backlog of complaints topped 16,000 in 2008, the year after Marianto met the whistleblower in Kuala Pembuang. In 2007, it completed investigations of just 19 cases. It is also constantly under attack from rival institutions. In 2009, as Nordin discussed Darwan with the KPK’s top brass, the agency was embroiled in a feud with the national police and attorney general’s office that culminated in its chairman and two of its deputies being framed for murder, extortion and bribery. Dimas Hartono, a Palangkaraya-based activist who worked with Nordin, argued that the campaign to undermine the KPK distracted from Darwan’s case.A display of public support for the KPK in 2009, the year of the agency’s first big feud with the national police. Photo by ivanatman/Flickr.The KPK is Indonesia’s most trusted institution, and most feared  —  it has never lost a case it has taken to court. But the agency holds dear to the mystique created by its perfect record, making it reluctant to proceed with any case in which a conviction is uncertain. It also cannot drop an investigation once it has begun, a clause embedded in the law to prevent defendants from paying their way out of trouble. But the rule, ICW’s Langkun believes, has had the perverse effect of scaring the agency away from more complex cases.In recent years, ICW has reported 18 cases that “resemble Seruyan” that it believes were not processed for lack of a clear kickback to the officials involved. “Frankly, we’re disappointed,” Langkun said. “It’s made things very difficult for us.”Darwan may also have been perceived as too small a target to merit the resources it would have required to take him down. The KPK focuses more on “big fish” in the capital than bupatis from the outer islands. Whether it deprioritized the case because he was too small a catch, or because the state losses were not clear enough, it highlights a gaping hole in the agency’s ability to prevent precisely the kind of corruption that has the biggest impacts on Indonesia’s forests and its millions of rural people.In theory, an alternative pathway exists: Darwan might have been reported for nepotism. Nepotism is defined similarly to corruption, but a viable case does not require proof of state losses. The glaring caveat is that the crime falls under the jurisdiction of the police and attorney general’s office, whom Nordin believed would have asked Darwan for money to drop the case. Jimly Asshiddiqie, the founding chief justice of Indonesia’s Constitutional Court, echoed this view. “In practice, we have a problem with these traditional institutions,” he told us. “They are not enforcing the law; they’re actually protecting the companies.”Jeffrey Winters, a Northwestern University professor who studies oligarchies in Indonesia and elsewhere, compared the legal system outside the KPK to “a light switch that can be turned on or off” by those with money or political clout. If the entire system operated like the antigraft agency, he said, the country would be as corruption-free as Singapore. “The KPK has a relatively narrow anticorruption mandate and capacity,” he said. “A large part of the corruption spectrum is outside the purview of the KPK. And that part of the spectrum is not effectively pursued.”Whichever combination of flaws allowed Darwan to slip through the net, the fact that he did was symptomatic of a problem that stretched far beyond the borders of Seruyan. Across the archipelago, the control of the office of the bupati over natural resources, combined with the option of using proxies and shell companies to nefarious ends, has attracted politicians with the aim of consolidating power and wealth at the expense of their people.“It’s a loophole,” said Grahat Nagara, a researcher at Auriga, an NGO that works closely with the KPK. “That’s how all the dynasties in Indonesia make their money.”Read the entire the story here. And then follow Mongabay and The Gecko Project on Facebook (here and here in English; here and here in Indonesian) for updates on Indonesia for Sale. You can also visit The Gecko Project’s own site, in English or Indonesian. Read the article introducing the series here. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Anonymous Companies, Corruption, Environment, Environmental Law, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Law Enforcement, Rainforests, Transparency, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by mongabayauthorlast_img read more

Police to Confiscate Motor Bikes for Violations

first_imgAuthorities of the Liberian National Police (LNP) have vowed to seize motorbikes if the operators violate recent restrictions that banned them from ridding in certain areas described as “No Go Zones.”  According to an LNP release issued yesterday, police will be left with no alternative, but to take   stern actions against motor cycle operators who violate the “No Go Zones” restriction that was imposed by the government on November 6, 2012.The release quoted the Director of Police, Colonel Chris Massaquoi, warning that repeated violation of the restriction by motorcyclists will no longer be tolerated. Col. Massaquoi has called on owners of motorcycles to advise their riders to desist as drastic measures, including the confiscation of their bikes and subsequent prosecution await anyone caught disregarding the regulation.The “No Go Zones” restriction prohibits motorcycle operators from plying the Tubman Boulevard to Central Monrovia, Somalia Drive, and from Bong Mines Bridge to Central Monrovia.”The restriction was imposed as the result of an increase in the wave of motorcycle-related accidents and injuries as well as the facilitation of criminal activities around Monrovia and its environs perceived to be masterminded by some motorcyclists.At the same time, the LNP said the City of Paynesville still remains closed to motorcyclists until the ongoing investigation into the recent incident that resulted in the death of a cyclist and the burning of police detachments in Paynesville is completed.The April 16 incident saw the vandalizing of police zones and depots. Director Massaquoi has instructed the LNP to arrest any violators who challenge the officers while they are enforcing the restriction and send those violators to the Ministry of Justice for prosecution.Col. Massaquoi  called on the general public to remain law abiding and continue to report suspected crimes to the police to ensure the safety of community dwellers.He admonished those politicizing the operations of the LNP to    desist as they remain focus on their law enforcement responsibility.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Sheffield Wednesday boss Luhukay slates team’s defending after defeat at QPR

first_imgEmbed from Getty Images​Sheffield Wednesday manager Jos Luhukay admitted his side were punished for some sloppy defending in their defeat at QPR.Wednesday were beaten 3-0 at Loftus Road, where Nahki Wells, on as a substitute, fired home with seven minutes remaining after goals from Tomer Hemed and Luke Freeman.“In our defending we were not consistent enough and did not clear the dangerous moments. The goals were too easy,” Luhakay said.“We were not strong enough to win and the result of 3-0 says something about this game.“At 1-0 we had three or four moments when the ball was not lucky for our strikers to ​score​ and then QPR came one time in the second half and scored a second goal.“Our team did not give up. But the third goal we also gave away, losing the ball in a dangerous area.“When you do that you invite the opponent to score the third goal and then it’s over.“In possession we were poor. We could not keep the ball and every time the ball went to one of our strikers we were losing the ball.“The crucial moment was the second goal. Before that you must make it 1-1 and the game maybe goes in a different direction.”See also:McClaren hails Wells after QPR win again Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebookby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksRecommended for youApartments for Sale | Search AdsApartments in Dubai Might Be Cheaper Than You ThinkApartments for Sale | Search AdsUndoProperty Investment | Search AdsDubai Real Estate Investment Properties May Surprise YouProperty Investment | Search AdsUndoFood PreventAnti-Aging Foods That Will Make Your Skin GlowFood PreventUndoElcondicional.com找出為什麼你應該停止吃白麵包Elcondicional.comUndoU.S Green Card – Free check您是否符合入籍美國的資格?快速檢查一下。U.S Green Card – Free checkUndoHashtagchatterHuman Barbie Takes Off Makeup, Doctors Have No WordsHashtagchatterUndoHair Transplant | Search AdsThe Cost of Hair Transplant in Dubai Might Surprise YouHair Transplant | Search AdsUndoRelocation Target11 Most Luxurious Hotels That Will Surprise YouRelocation TargetUndolast_img read more

Of cupcakes and hockey sticks: Sharks say they have routines, but not superstitions

first_imgSAN JOSE — The first rule about having superstitions is to not to refer to them as being superstitions.They’re called routines, in case you were curious.“Superstition has this stigma about it,” Sharks winger Evander Kane said. “Superstitions are fine. Everybody has them, whether they admit it or not.”The Sharks have won six straight going into Tuesday’s home game against the Edmonton Oilers. They’ve completely turned around their season in that time, going from a team that was at the …last_img

10 months agoNice chief Julien Fournier a target for Southampton

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Nice chief Julien Fournier a target for Southamptonby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNice chief Julien Fournier is a target for Southampton.The Daily Mail says Fournier, the general manager of French club Nice, is lined up to be the next director of football at Southampton.The vastly experienced 44-year-old who played a key role in persuading Patrick Vieira to become Nice’s manager, has worked previously as secretary general of Marseille and was the youngest president of Strasbourg.Southampton sacked Les Reed as vice-chairman in November and technical director Martin Hunter.The club’s Chinese owner, Gao Jisheng and his family, who took control in the summer of last year, have been working on a restructure of the club after appointing highly-rated Ralph Hasenhuttl as manager. last_img read more