Experts to China: cooperate or South China Sea fisheries may collapse

first_imgChina’s Demand For Resources, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Islands, Law Enforcement, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing Article published by Rebecca Kessler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img More than half the fishing vessels in the world operate in the South China Sea, where sovereign rights have been an object of fierce contention among bordering countries.Scientists have been warning that the sea is fast becoming the site of an environmental disaster, the impending collapse of one of the world’s most productive fisheries.Now a group of experts that includes geopolitical strategists as well as marine biologists is calling on the disputing parties to come together to manage and protect the sea’s fish stocks and marine environment.Effective management hinges on China’s active participation, but it remains unclear whether that country, now the dominant power in the sea with a big appetite for seafood, will cooperate. For years, sovereign rights in the South China Sea have been an object of fierce contention among the states that border it: the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei, Indonesia and Vietnam (all members of the 10-nation ASEAN group), China, their giant neighbor to the north, and Taiwan as well. But while the bordering states jockey for advantage, with China now clearly the dominant local power, scientists have been warning that the sea is fast becoming the site of an environmental disaster, the impending collapse of one of the world’s most productive fisheries.Now a group of experts that includes geopolitical strategists as well as marine biologists is calling on the disputing parties to come together to manage and protect the sea’s fish stocks and marine environment. All can do so, the experts argue, without compromising their territorial claims. The success of any management scheme hinges on China’s whole-hearted participation, but it remains unclear whether that country, a major power with a big appetite for seafood, will cooperate.“In the South China Sea, fish may spawn in one nation’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ), live as juveniles in another’s, and spend most of their adult lives in a third. Overfishing or environmental destruction at any point in the chain affects all those who live around the sea,” the experts wrote this fall in a brief outlining their recommendations. “The entire South China Sea is teetering on the edge of a fisheries collapse, and the only way to avoid it is through multilateral cooperation in disputed waters.”A Malaysian navy pier on Layang Layang Atoll in the disputed Spratly Islands of the South China Sea. Photo courtesy of Greg Asner / Divephoto.org.“Steady catches mask a serious problem” The South China Sea, SCS for short, is a broad, semi-enclosed expanse, half again larger than the Mediterranean, and no less strategically important. More than half the fishing vessels in the world operate in the SCS, and in recent years, it has regularly produced about 12 percent of the global fish catch.But this regularity is deceptive. “Steady catches mask a serious problem,” U.S. Air Force area specialist Adam Greer wrote in the Diplomat last year. The amount of effort required to sustain production has risen sharply, and “catches increasingly consist of smaller species whose populations have boomed as natural predators have been overfished — a phenomenon commonly referred to as ‘fishing down the food web.’” A report led by University of British Columbia professors Rashid Sumaila and William Cheung concluded that biomass in the SCS has been fished down to between 5 and 30 percent of its 1950 level, and that perhaps 40 percent of the total catch is either illegal or simply unreported.The five ­­ASEAN member states bordering the sea have staked claims to exclusive economic zones (EEZs) in accordance with rules laid down in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) that came into force in 1994. These claims overlap where neighboring nations have different ideas about where to draw their baselines, but most observers agree that they shouldn’t be too hard to sort out should the need arise. China’s claim, by contrast, is legally intractable.Map shows South China Sea, including occupied islands by country. (Unoccupied islands not shown.) Map courtesy of CSIS Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative.UNCLOS, which China ratified, says China can claim only an EEZ off its southern coast extending halfway to Vietnam and the Philippine archipelago. Instead, Beijing claims that all the islands, rocks and reefs of the South China Sea have been “China’s historical territory since ancient times.”In 1974, Chinese forces wrested control of the Paracel Islands from a South Vietnamese garrison. Subsequently, China occupied a number of reefs in the Spratly Islands adjacent to islands and reefs already occupied by Vietnamese and Philippine detachments. When Chinese Coast Guard vessels chased Filipino fishermen from Scarborough Shoal, a rich fishery about 200 km (124 miles) west of Luzon, the main island of the Philippine archipelago, Manila’s patience was exhausted. It appealed to the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea in the Hague. When the tribunal ruled against China in July 2016, calling its extensive SCS claim incompatible with international law, China’s vice foreign minister, Liu Zhenmin, called the ruling “nothing more than a piece of waste paper” that “will not be enforced by anyone.”In addition to dismissing China’s “historic use” argument, the tribunal also ruled that the activities of China’s fishing fleet flouted UNCLOS injunctions to cooperate with neighbors in protecting fragile ecosystems and managing fisheries. Although Chinese Coast Guard vessels have attacked foreign fishing vessels near islands it contends are its own, China has seemed less dismissive of this part of the tribunal’s ruling. This has heartened marine biologists with decades of experience studying changes in South China Sea ecosystems, who reason that China has as much to lose as any other of the claimant states from continued free-for-all competition over dwindling resources. On that they hang a hope: that China, now strongly implanted at least as far south as the artificial islands it has built in the disputed Spratly Islands, will choose to cooperate in managing SCS fish stocks sustainably.A Vietnamese fishing boat on the South China Sea. Photo by Jean-Pierre Bluteau via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).“Join … or we’ll eat everything”Meetings sponsored this summer by the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, D.C., brought more than two-dozen participants together to explore the dilemma. They came from the U.S., the Philippines, Singapore, Malaysia, Australia, Canada, Vietnam, and Taiwan. Chinese experts were not invited because, meeting coordinator Gregory Poling of CSIS told Mongabay, “it is difficult these days to find Chinese experts willing to call publicly for compromise on the South China Sea. At the end of the day, the goals of including a member from every claimant … and of giving ourselves the best chance of reaching consensus on a robust final product were at odds.”Participants focused on how to induce China to work with other claimant states to limit the annual catch of fast-declining stocks of tuna, halibut, mackerel, grouper, and other prized species, and to protect dozens of reefs that supply larval fish to coastal fisheries. In September they published their recommendations online as “A Blueprint for Fisheries Management and Environmental Cooperation in the South China Sea.” Explicit in the Blueprint is the notion that all claimants must cooperate for management and protection to be effective, and that they can do so without compromising their territorial claims. Implicit in it is recognition that China must step up to lead such an effort.China’s posture is pivotal because of the sheer size and industrial scale of its fishing fleet, which, as China’s coastal fisheries have been depleted, has ranged deeply into waters traditionally fished by other SCS states. Moreover, China has established bases in the Paracel and Spratly archipelagos (the latter on the carcasses of seven reefs it destroyed for the purpose), which greatly extend the range of its naval and paramilitary forces.China’s posture is also problematic because marine environmental protection, particularly multilateral efforts, have to date been a low priority in the SCS, ranking far behind unilateral measures aimed at dominating the sea militarily and winning control of its resources, which include oil and gas fields as well as open ocean and reef fisheries.China’s ritual assertion of “indisputable sovereignty over the islands of the South China Sea, and the adjacent waters” is a formulation associated with Mao Zedong’s reformist successor, Deng Xiaoping, who frequently coupled it with a call for “joint development” of SCS resources. However, although the ASEAN group has aimed at collective agreements that include all SCS claimants, China has shown a decided preference for unilateral action or for one-on-one pacts, arrangements that if concluded it can easily dominate. Its annual proclamation of a fishing moratorium in the northern half of the SCS is a good example of this strategy.“China is in effect holding a gun to the head of the Southeast Asia fishing industry, saying either join our fish management arrangements or we’ll eat everything,” Bill Hayton, author of The South China Sea: The Struggle for Power in Asia, told Mongabay.A green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) in the Spratly Islands of the South China Sea. Photo courtesy of Greg Asner / Divephoto.org.“This sea is a bit like a large bowl of soup” And yet, this may change. Specialists argue that unilateral Chinese efforts to enforce its annual three-month ban on fishing are doomed. They say the proscribed area is too vast for China to patrol effectively. Further, Beijing’s edicts inspire the Philippines, Vietnam and Taiwan to urge their fishermen to defy them. For these countries, doing less would be tantamount to recognizing Chinese sovereignty over areas they claim as EEZ in conformity with UNCLOS rules.John McManus, a marine ecologist at the University of Miami who coauthored the Blueprint, told Mongabay that to police the fish-rich areas of the expanse it claims, China would need to deploy ”an enormous enforcement fleet at tremendous expense both in terms of money and in terms of a loss of global respect — something which runs directly counter to what China is trying to achieve.”Lina Gong, a security researcher at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore with close ties to Chinese academics, argues that Beijing has recognized that “Chinese fishermen tend to overfish” and is moving to bring the activities of its fishing fleet under tighter control. In 2015 China reportedly accounted for 18 percent of the total world ocean catch. McManus told Mongabay he is heartened by a Chinese promise to “cut back substantially on the size of its SCS fishing fleet, which would be a major step toward sustainability.”Not just in the CSIS Blueprint but also in policy papers and at conferences this autumn in England and Taiwan, a range of experts have been delivering a consistent message to policy-makers: fisheries management, with effective policing, can’t wait for rival states to agree on who owns what in the SCS. Instead, they say, China and its ASEAN neighbors must soon set up some sort of regional fisheries management organization. Failing that, fish stocks, already severely stressed, will crash and take decades to recover.“This sea is a bit like a large bowl of soup with at least six nations each sipping through straws. If one nation sips slowly, the others will take up the slack,” McManus said. “The only way to achieve sustainability is via cooperative agreement … China alone cannot do it. There is no reason to believe that they will oppose joining a new, more regionally focused fishery and environmental sustainability organization.”A manta ray in the South China Sea. Photo courtesy of Greg Asner / Divephoto.org.“A rules-based framework”Cooperative action including China is not a new idea. For two decades, ASEAN has sought to win China’s agreement to a Code of Conduct (COC) for the South China Sea. At last, in August 2017, the foreign ministers of China and the 10 ASEAN members endorsed a plan for substantive negotiations on a COC, with the first objective being “To establish a rules-based framework containing a set of norms to guide the conduct of parties and promote maritime cooperation in the South China Sea.” The agreement was hailed as a breakthrough, although Beijing once again gave no indication that it is prepared to accept binding constraints on its behavior.Neither maritime scientific research nor environmental protection is specifically mentioned in the one-page plan. However, these are believed to be among the activities subsumed under the catchall phrase “promotion of practical maritime cooperation,” according to an analysis of the plan by Singapore-based researcher Ian Storey,Assuming that’s so, the authors of the Blueprint seek to persuade ASEAN’s COC negotiators to aim high. “What we hoped to do is lay down a marker, to prove that it is possible to negotiate fair, legal and workable agreements,” said Poling of CSIS. “Our blueprint on fisheries and environmental cooperation … is detailed, entirely feasible, and in accordance with both international law and domestic law in the relevant countries.”As the ASEAN states begin what likely will be protracted wrangling over details of the long-elusive COC, the Blueprint’s authors hope the negotiators will give priority to agreement on a fisheries chapter with teeth. These include the creation of a collective fisheries management organization, agreement to set aside ecosystem-based fisheries zones covering remaining reefs vital to the health of regional fish stocks, and real resolve to fast track their implementation. Would China agree if, as the CSIS group hopes, ASEAN presses a proposal along these lines?In reply to Mongabay’s e-mail query, Nong Hong, director of the Institute for China-America Studies in Washington, D.C, was non-committal. The Blueprint, she said, “is not really something new. We (including scholars from China, Taiwan and other claimants) have been discussing fishery conservation and management issues for years.”Carl Thayer, an emeritus political scientist at the University of New South Wales in Australia, has tracked the ASEAN-China discussions on an SCS Code of Conduct for over two decades. Judging by Beijing’s past behavior, he said he doubts China’s sincerity, pointing to Beijing’s disregard for the UNCLOS Tribunal Award and its continual militarization of reefs and islands it occupies in the South China Sea.And yet, Thayer told Mongabay, the elements of an agreement are at hand. Beijing has achieved its goal of effective hegemony over the SCS expanse. It has ambitious plans for building infrastructure and alliances in Central Asia and the Indian Ocean region to implement president Xi Jinping’s “One Belt, One Road” concept. Continued bullying of China’s neighbors around the SCS puts other would-be development partners on guard. Common sense for China, Thayer pointed out, lies in the direction of striking an agreement with ASEAN on cooperation in the South China Sea that reflects current realities and its own interest, so it can move on.An underwater view of the reef at Layang Layang Atoll in the Spratly Islands, South China Sea. Photo courtesy of Greg Asner / Divephoto.org.David Brown, a retired American diplomat, is now a frequent writer on contemporary Vietnam and its neighborhood. His e-mail address is nworbd@gmail.com.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

UN General Assembly adopts resolution to move forward with high seas treaty negotiations

first_imgThe General Assembly of the United Nations adopted a resolution on Sunday to convene negotiations for an international treaty to protect the marine environments of the high seas.Earth’s high seas represent about two-thirds of the oceans, but are not governed by any one international body or agency and there is currently no comprehensive management structure in place to protect the marine life that relies on them.According to the Pew Charitable Trusts, the treaty would be the first international agreement to address the impacts of human activities like fishing and shipping on the high seas. The General Assembly of the United Nations adopted a resolution on Sunday to convene negotiations for an international treaty to protect the marine environments of the high seas.Vast areas of ocean that lie outside any country’s exclusive economic zone — or, in other words, more than 200 nautical miles or more from any country’s shores — the high seas are areas of Earth’s oceans that lie beyond all national jurisdiction. They represent about two-thirds of the oceans, but the high seas are not governed by any one international body or agency and there is currently no comprehensive management structure in place to protect the marine life that relies on them.According to the Pew Charitable Trusts, the treaty would be the first international agreement to address the impacts of human activities like fishing and shipping on the high seas. It would not only create a global system for coordinating the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity, but would also pave the way for the creation of marine protected areas (MPAs) and fully protected marine reserves in open waters.The UN reports reports that, as of 2017, 5.3 percent of the total global ocean area has been protected. That includes 13.2 percent of marine environments that fall under national jurisdiction, but just 0.25 percent of marine environments beyond national jurisdiction.Pew’s Liz Karan told Mongabay that high seas fisheries are estimated to account for up to $16 billion annually in gross catch, while estimates of the economic value of carbon storage from the high seas ranges from $74 billion to $220 billion a year. There are regional and sectoral bodies that have a very narrow mandate to look after particular high seas areas, but no body that looks at the ecosystem as a whole. “In these times, with a changing climate, looking at ecosystem resilience is especially important,” Karan said.The resolution adopted on December 24 had been anticipated since the final meeting this past June of a UN Preparatory Committee, which issued an official recommendation that the General Assembly launch an intergovernmental conference to negotiate a high seas treaty.“After more than 10 years of discussion, it is encouraging that United Nations member states unanimously agreed to move forward in 2018 with negotiations for an international agreement that would fill the gaps in ocean management to ensure protection for marine life on the high seas,” Karan said in a statement.“The international community, including scientists and members of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), agrees that at least 30 percent of the world’s ocean should be set aside in MPAs and reserves to achieve a sustainable ocean. Protecting biodiversity on the high seas will be a key component of moving toward this goal.”The resolution lays out the negotiation process as consisting of four meetings, starting in 2018 and going through mid-2020. The first intergovernmental talks will take place in September 2018, and the final treaty text is expected by the end of 2020.At the conclusion of its meetings, the UN Preparatory Committee issued a report that made several recommendations of items to be included in an international high seas agreement, but there are still some crucial issues that must be hammered out via treaty negotiations.“Key questions that the countries will be discussing over the next two years through this intergovernmental conference will be what are the protections that can be taken at an international level, who are the decision-makers, how will that management be conducted and implemented, and then what kind of mechanisms for monitoring, review, and enforcement will follow through to make sure that those protections are not just designated but actually result in conservation benefits and change on the water,” Karan told Mongabay.Many other conservationists were quick to applaud the UN’s adoption of a resolution to move forward with high seas treaty negotiations, as well.“This is great news. This vote could open the way to create a Paris Agreement for the ocean,” Maria Damanaki, a former European Union Commissioner for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries who now works for The Nature Conservancy, told The Guardian on the eve of the adoption of the resolution to move forward with treaty negotiations. “This could be the most important step I have seen in my 30 years working on oceans.”Two fishing vessels at sunset. Photo via Max Pixel, licensed under Creative Commons Zero – CC0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Climate Change, Climate Change And Conservation, Environment, Fisheries, Fishing, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Oceans And Climate Change, Protected Areas, United Nations last_img read more

Microplastic pollution in world’s oceans poses major threat to filter-feeding megafauna

first_imgA study published in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution last month looks at how filter-feeding marine animals like baleen whales, manta rays, and whale sharks are impacted by microplastic pollution in the world’s oceans.Filter-feeding megafauna must swallow hundreds to thousands of cubic meters of water every day in order to catch enough plankton to keep themselves nourished. That means that these species are probably ingesting microplastics both directly from polluted water and indirectly through the consumption of contaminated plankton prey.Microplastic particles can block nutrient absorption and damage the digestive tracts of the filter-feeding marine life that ingest them, while toxins and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) found in plastic can accumulate in the bodies of marine wildlife over time, changing biological processes such as growth and reproduction and even leading to decreased fertility. Even as the world is waking up to the problems created by the massive amounts of plastic pollution in Earth’s oceans — and taking steps to address the issue — new research is shedding light on how detrimental that pollution is to marine wildlife.A study published in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution last month, for instance, looks at how filter-feeding marine animals like baleen whales, manta rays, and whale sharks are impacted by microplastics. Filter feeders face exceptionally high risks of exposure to plastic pollution in the oceans because many of them are found in some of the most polluted waters in the world, such as the Bay of Bengal, the Gulf of Mexico, the Mediterranean Sea, and the Coral Triangle, a geographical region that lies in the waters between Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, and the Philippines.A 2016 report by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation found that more than 8 million metric tons of plastic waste makes its way into the oceans every year, which works out to be roughly a garbage truck-full of plastic being dumped into the oceans every minute. What’s more, the report also determined that if we allow business-as-usual to continue, plastic pollution could find its way into our oceans at four times the current rate by 2050 — at which point the plastic in our oceans would weigh more than all of the fish combined.In response to this issue, more than 40 countries have joined the UN Environment Programme’s CleanSeas campaign, which was launched last year to combat the use of microplastics in cosmetics and single-use plastic products like shopping bags, two of the biggest sources of marine plastic litter.A whale shark in the waters of Isla Mujeres, Mexico. Photo Credit: Dr Simon Pierce/Marine Megafauna Foundation.But, according to Elitza Germanov, a researcher with the Marine Megafauna Foundation and a PhD student at Australia’s Murdoch University, while there is a growing body of research on how microplastics are impacting marine environments, few studies have specifically looked at how large filter feeders are effected.“We are still trying to understand the magnitude of the issue,” Germanov, the lead author of the Trends in Ecology & Evolution study, said in a statement. “It has become clear though that microplastic contamination has the potential to further reduce the population numbers of these species, many of which are long-lived and have few offspring throughout their lives.”Filter-feeding megafauna like whale sharks and manta rays must swallow hundreds to thousands of cubic meters of water every day in order to catch enough plankton to keep themselves nourished. That means that these species are probably ingesting microplastics both directly from polluted water and indirectly through the consumption of contaminated plankton prey.“The estimated daily plastic ingestion rates for filter-feeding megafauna vary greatly, depending on location and feeding behavior, and range from as low as 100 pieces for whale sharks in the Gulf of California to as high as thousands of pieces for fin whales in the Pelagos Sanctuary,” Germanov and co-authors note in the study. “Currently, the plastic ingestion rates by filter-feeding megafauna in the Gulf of Mexico, Bay of Bengal, and the Coral Triangle are unknown, as are the ingestion rates for mobulids anywhere in the world.”Microplastics under a microscope. Photo Credit: Elitza Germanov/Marine Megafauna Foundation.Microplastic particles can block nutrient absorption and damage the digestive tracts of the filter-feeding marine life that ingest them, while toxins and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) found in plastic can accumulate in the bodies of marine wildlife over time, changing biological processes such as growth and reproduction and even leading to decreased fertility. Toxins that have bioaccumulated in long-lived filter feeders can also be passed down from mother to offspring. These effects can pose serious risks to animals that are already facing heightened threats to their existence.“It is vital to understand the effects of microplastic pollution on ocean giants since nearly half of the mobulid rays, two thirds of filter-feeding sharks and over one quarter of baleen whales are listed by the IUCN as globally threatened species and are prioritized for conservation,” Germanov said.Germanov and co-authors note in the study that research has yet to directly confirm that filter-feeding megafauna are exposed to POPs and other toxins associated with plastics through the ingestion of microplastics. Because conventional methods used to study the diets of wildlife, like cutting open stomachs to examine their contents, are not suitable for species whose continued existence is already in peril, a more indirect approach must be taken. “Most studies have now moved onto biopsies as strandings are rare and fisheries illegal or unethical for threatened species,” Germanov told Mongabay. She and her co-authors elaborate on the alternative methods available to researchers: “as the analytical approaches available to detect toxins continue to increase, it is possible to analyze small amounts of tissue obtained nonlethally (i.e., via biopsies) and to test for plastic chemical tracers, such as phthalates, organobromines, or specific congeners of POPs, allowing us to investigate correlations between microplastics in the feeding grounds of filter feeders and the exposure of these organisms to toxins.”Sabrina Weiss, a public relations officer for the Marine Megafauna Foundation, noted in an email to Mongabay that while the definite causal link between plastic ingestion and resulting toxin exposure in marine megafauna has yet to be confirmed, “previous reports and laboratory studies in seabirds (Teuten et al. 2009), and small fish (Rochman et al 2014) have already shown these connections.”Study co-author Maria Cristina Fossi, of Italy’s University of Siena, was one of the first scientists to study megafauna filter-feeders and their exposure to microplastic pollution. She and her colleagues found an average of 0.7 plastic items per cubic meter of water around Mexico’s Baja California peninsula, an important feeding ground for endangered whale sharks, and estimated that whale sharks in the Sea of Cortez (also known as the Gulf of California, the body of water that separates mainland Mexico from Baja California) may be ingesting more than 170 plastic items every day. They’ve also estimated that fin whales in the Mediterranean Sea could be consuming thousands of microplastic particles on a daily basis.“Our studies on whale sharks in the Sea of Cortez and on fin whales in the Mediterranean Sea confirmed exposure to toxic chemicals, indicating that these filter feeders are taking up microplastics in their feeding grounds,” Fossi said in a statement. “Exposure to these plastic-associated toxins pose a major threat to the health of these animals since it can alter the hormones, which regulate the body’s growth and development, metabolism, and reproductive functions, among other things.”While Fossi and colleagues’ previous research found that large filter-feeders like fin whales, whale sharks, and basking sharks are exposed to plastic-associated toxins and that there is evidence for plastic ingestion, Germanov told Mongabay that they did not show plastic in the stomach or guts of the species with POPs contamination.What is clear at this point, according to Germanov, is that, with plastic production projected to increase globally, much more research is needed on the impacts of plastic pollution in the world’s oceans. She suggests that future research should focus on coastal regions where microplastic pollution overlaps with the feeding and breeding grounds of threatened species. “Many areas are biodiversity hotspots and of economic importance due to fisheries and marine tourism,” she said. “Targeting these with the backing of local government and industry will help ensure efforts to mitigate the plastic threat are employed to their fullest.”A manta ray swims amidst plastic pollution in Indonesian waters. Photo Credit: Elitza Germanov.CITATIONS• Germanov, E. S., Marshall, A. D., Bejder, L., Fossi, M. C., & Loneragan, N. R. (2018). Microplastics: No small problem for filter-feeding megafauna. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. doi:10.1016/j.tree.2018.01.005• Rochman, C. M., Kurobe, T., Flores, I., & Teh, S. J. (2014). Early warning signs of endocrine disruption in adult fish from the ingestion of polyethylene with and without sorbed chemical pollutants from the marine environment. Science of the Total Environment, 493, 656-661. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.06.051• Teuten, E. L., Saquing, J. M., Knappe, D. R., Barlaz, M. A., Jonsson, S., Björn, A., … & Ochi, D. (2009). Transport and release of chemicals from plastics to the environment and to wildlife. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, 364(1526), 2027-2045. doi:10.1098/rstb.2008.0284Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Environment, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Mammals, Microplastics, Oceans, Plastic, Pollution, Sharks, Sharks And Rays, Whale Sharks, Whales, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Prep CIF schedule

first_imgInvitational Division first round San Pedro at Reseda WEDNESDAYBOYS BASKETBALLSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 7:30 p.m. Division I-AA wild card Wilson at Torrance El Segundo at Bellflower Warren at Dana Hills Division IV-A first round Milken Community at Valley Christian Division V-AA first round Avalon at Woodcrest Christian GIRLS BASKETBALLL.A. CITY SECTION All games at 7 p.m. Invitational Division first round Santee at San Pedro BOYS SOCCERSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 3 p.m. Division I wild card Westlake at Cabrillo Division IV wild card Lynwood at Artesia Norwalk at Irvine Division VI wild card St. Paul at Redlands Adventist GIRLS SOCCERSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 3 p.m. Division III wild card Bellflower at Fullerton Division IV wild card St. Joseph at El Rancho Division V first round Lynwood at Arroyo Division VI wild card CAMS at Azusa Oxford Academy at Calvary Chapel Downey THURSDAYBOYS BASKETBALLL.A. CITY SECTION All games at 7 p.m. Championship Division first round Palisades at King-Drew Narbonne at Westchester GIRLS BASKETBALLSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 7:30 p.m. Division II-AA wild card Los Alamitos at St. Bonaventure GIRLS SOCCERL.A. CITY SECTION All games at 3 p.m. Championship Division first round South East at San Pedro Narbonne at Marshall Banning at Garfield Fairfax at South Gate Carson at Sylmar GIRLS WATER POLOSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 3:15 p.m. Division I first round Bell Gardens at Foothill Millikan at Irvine Mater Dei at Wilson El Toro at Los Alamitos Poly at Corona del Mar Division III first round Chino Hills at Downey FRIDAYBOYS BASKETBALLSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 7:30 p.m. Division I-AA first round Downey at Westlake Lakewood at Mayfair South Torrance/J. Serra winner at Compton La Mirada at Lawndale St. John Bosco at Gahr Servite/Verbum Dei winner at Dominguez North Torrance at Poly Jordan at Centennial Warren/Dana Hills winner at Artesia Division I-A first round Huntington Beach/Tustin winner at Los Alamitos Division IV-A second round Webb/L.A. Baptist winner at St. Anthony Division V-A second round Tarbut V’Torah/La Sierra Academy winner at L.A. Adventist GIRLS BASKETBALLL.A. CITY SECTION All games at 7 p.m. Championship Division first round Banning at Taft Eagle Rock at Carson King-Drew at L.A. Wilson BOYS SOCCERL.A. CITY SECTION All games at 3 p.m. Championship Division first round Banning at South East Huntington Park at Narbonne Carson at Bell San Pedro at Chatsworth Marshall at South Gate GIRLS SOCCERSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 3 p.m. Division I first round Chaminade at Los Alamitos Lakewood at El Toro Esperanza at Poly Trabuco Hills at Wilson Millikan at Mater Dei Division III first round Glenn at Sunny Hills Beverly Hills at La Mirada Corona Centennial at Mayfair Division V first round Beaumont at Downey Citrus Hills/Yucca Valley winner at Bell Gardens Warren at South Torrance Mountain View at Valley Christian Division VI first round Oxford Academy/Calvary Chapel Downey winner at Mary Star St. Matthias at St. Paul SATURDAYGIRLS BASKETBALLSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 7:30 p.m. Division I-AA first round Riverside Poly/Glendale winner at Poly Compton at Fullerton San Marcos at Lynwood Millikan at Santa Margarita Jordan at Bishop Montgomery JSerra at Wilson Sonora at Gahr Dominguez at Moorpark Division I-A first round Artesia at J.W. North Mayfair at Huntington Beach Palos Verdes at Cerritos El Toro at Glenn Division III-AA first round Savanna at St. Paul Mary Star at Jurupa Valley Division IV-AA first round Capistrano Valley Christian at St. Matthias St. Anthony at New Roads Desert Christian at Whitney Division V-AA first round Kern Valley at L.A. Adventist Division V-A first round CAMS at Pilibos BOYS SOCCERSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 3 p.m. Division I first round Schurr at Wilson Crespi/Quartz Hill winner at Millikan San Clemente at Los Alamitos Jordan at Royal Division III first round Santa Ynez/Crescenta Valley winner at Paramount Santa Fe at La Mirada Warren at El Rancho Saddleback/Norco winner at Bellflower Division V first round Valley Christian at La Puente Division VI first round Linfield Chr./Ontario Chr. winner at Avalon 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TODAYBOYS BASKETBALLL.A. CITY SECTION All games at 7 p.m. center_img GIRLS WATER POLOSOUTHERN SECTION All games at 3:15 p.m. Division III wild card Warren at South Pasadena Rowland at Cerritos last_img read more

A’s takeaways: Anderson’s fluke injury can’t prevent ‘W’ thanks to long ball

first_imgCLEVELAND — Baseball people often try to explain the game by simply saying, “That’s baseball.”It was a typical “That’s baseball,” fluky moment that resulted in starting pitcher Brett Anderson’s cervical strain and subsequent removal from the A’s 6-4 win over the Indians on Monday.Anderson said he instinctively jerked his neck away from the broken part of Roberto Perez’s bat after it shattered and flew to Anderson’s left on Perez’s groundout to shortstop Marcus Semien in the bottom of the …last_img

Oil refinery ‘will save SA billions’

first_img Source: BuaNews 18 October 2010 The proposed Mthombo crude oil refinery will help South Africa escape from the “dependency trap” of having to import refined automotive products, ultimately saving the country billions of rands, says President Jacob Zuma. At the same time, the refinery, to be built at the Coega Industrial Development Zone near Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape, would showcase South Africa’s competitive ability to its counterparts globally. Construction on the refinery, which will be the biggest in Africa, is expected to start in 2012, which would bring the refinery on stream by 2015. The US$11-billion refinery, which would have a 400 000 barrel a day capacity, is meant to ensure security of fuel supply in South Africa. The country is currently dependent on international oil companies to provide for its liquid fuel energy needs. “With Project Mthombo, this country stands to save an estimated R12.6-billion a year in energy costs once the refinery is running, and could export oil across Africa,” Zuma said last week. Zuma was speaking during a visit to PetroSA’s gas-to-liquid refinery in Mossel Bay in the Western Cape. The visit by Zuma and Energy Minister Dipuo Peters was to obtain a first-hand account of PetroSA’s operations, his office said. “We welcome the fact that PetroSA is making its impact, not only in job creation but in empowering the people as well. It employs close to 2 000 people, while 27 500 more will be absorbed within the crude oil refinery that is planned,” Zuma said. Zuma welcomed the impressive growth of PetroSA following its successful merger of Mossgas, Soekor and parts of the Strategic Fuel Fund in 2002. PetroSA is reaching markets in Europe, the United States, Caribbean, Middle East and Far East, which Zuma said was an important achievement. He also commended the National Oil Company for the role it was playing in reducing the country’s dependence on imported refined fuel. last_img read more

Srinagar bypoll: miscreants attack polling staff, stations

first_imgMiscreants stepped up attacks on polling staff and polling stations in Kashmir’s Budgam district, a day ahead of bypolls to Srinagar Lok Sabha seat.Some miscreants tried to set ablaze a government school building, designated as a polling station, in Narbal area of Budgam district late last night, DGP S.P. Vaid said.He said the building was saved by the timely action of police personnel deployed in the area.In a separate incident, a group of youth pelted stones at polling staff, who were on their way to a polling station, in Beerwah area of Budgam this morning, a police official said.The police swung into action and chased away the accused, the official said, adding no one was hurt in the brief clashes.Meanwhile, a low intensity blast occurred inside a government school premises, which has been designated as a polling station, in Khanyar of the state capital, triggering panic in the area.The very low intensity blast took place due to mishandling of a tear gas canister by secuirty forces personnel, a police spokesman said.Srinagar Lok Sabha constituency, spread over three districts of Srinagar, Budgam and Ganderbal is scheduled to go to polls on Sunday.The by-poll has been necessitated by resignation of then PDP leader and member Lok Sabha Tariq Hameed Karra last year to protest against the “atrocities” by security forces during the summer unrest triggered by the killing of Hizbul Mujhaideen commander Burhan Wani in an encounter in July last year.last_img read more

2004 NATIONAL 18’S STORIES ARCHIVED

first_imgAll stories and results from the 2004 National 18’s Championships held recently in Coffs Harbour, have now been archived. These stories can now be viewed using the following link: NATIONAL 18’S STORIES AND RESULTS and click on 2004 They can also be viewed using the ‘News Archive’ link on the ATA homepage: NATIONAL 18’S STORIES AND RESULTS NEWS ARCHIVE (all stories will be found under September 2004)last_img

Womens Volleyball Ohio State loses 32 to No 3 Penn State and

Ohio State head coach Geoff Carlston instructs members of the women’s volleyball team during a timeout in a match against No. 3 Penn State on Oct. 6. The Buckeyes lost 3-2. Credit: Rebecca Farage | Lantern ReporterOhio State split two home matches this weekend as it fell 3-2 to No. 3 Penn State Friday, but returned to the court the next day and picked up a 3-0 victory versus Rutgers.No. 3 Penn StateDespite losing 3-2 to Penn State, outside hitter Bia Franklin had a big night with 10 kills and nine digs, both career-highs for the sophomore. Setter Taylor Hughes also played a solid game with a match-high 50 assists, a total she had only matched just once previously this season.Penn State quickly jumped ahead in the first set with an 8-3 lead. Even after two timeouts, the Buckeyes could not match Penn State’s energy. The Nittany Lions delivered 18 kills with a .500 hitting percentage, leaving the Buckeyes behind and allowing Penn State to take the first set 25-13.The Buckeyes did not let the first set affect their performance as they stormed out to an 11-8 lead in the second set.The game grew more intense by the point as both teams fought back-and-forth for the second set with three lead changes. Outside hitter Luisa Schirmer was responsible for five kills and Hughes added 14 assists, leading the Buckeyes to win the set 25-23.The third set was just as competitive as the second, this time with 12 ties. Penn State middle blocker Haleigh Washington helped her team with seven kills on a .364 clip. Tensions were high as both teams played a close point-by-point set, ending in a 30-28 victory for the Buckeyes.The fourth set was quite a turnaround as the Buckeyes fell to a 13-6 deficit, forcing them to call a timeout. The Nittany Lions maintained their momentum and did not relinquish their lead. With 14 kills and 13 digs, Penn State took the set 25-9.The Nittany Lions carried their vibrant energy into the fifth set, leaving the Buckeyes to trail behind them 8-0. Although the Buckeyes attempted to catch up, Penn State took the set and the match with a decisive 15-7 victoryAlthough he sees room for improvement, Ohio State head coach Geoff Carlston thought his team played well against Penn State and recognized the tough moments the Buckeyes worked through.“In this conference and to go where we want to go, you have to be able to do it,” Carlston said. “If it’s a 2 1/2 hour match, you got to do it for 2 1/2 hours. It’s hard.”RutgersThe Buckeyes dominated Saturday night, bouncing back from their loss with a 3-0 sweep against Rutgers. Outside hitter Ashley Wenz was the star of the night with a career-high 18 kills.Wenz said she was not anticipating setting any records this weekend, but sees this as a success for the team as a whole, not just for herself.“I think it helps playing all the way around,” Wenz said. “We’re running the back row attack and it’s been working really well. We have a really nice rhythm with it right now, so that definitely helps.”Ohio State played a sound first set with 11 kills and 10 digs. Wenz put away four kills in the first set, and Rutgers had just a -.050 hitting percentage. The Buckeyes won the opening set 25-15.The second set went just as well for the Buckeyes as they were able to play strong offensively with 13 kills and posses a powerful defensive line with two blocks from middle blocker Madison Smeathers and Hughes. Ohio State claimed the set 25-12 to take a 2-0 lead in the match.  The Buckeyes played no differently in the third set, leading with a 9-1 opening run before the Scarlet Knights called a timeout. Although Rutgers was able to pull within just a couple points, Ohio State maintained a steady pace and won the third set 26-24, taking the match.Wenz thought playing these two teams were completely different experiences, but was proud of her team’s progress despite the weekend split.“I think [Rutgers was] pretty scrappy on defense and [we were] able to make the smart shots that we needed to make to be able to put the ball down,” Wenz said.The team’s success Saturday has shown Carlston what the Buckeyes are capable of, but he is only focused on making the team the best they can be.“We made some strides in some areas this weekend, but we just need to come back and keep getting better on Monday,” Carlston said. “We just got to stay focused. We can be really good, but we need to keep challenging ourselves to get better.”The Buckeyes will hit the road again as they face Illinois at 8 p.m. Friday and Northwestern at 8 p.m. Saturday. read more