Indonesia seeks to slap money-laundering label on illegal fishing

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Indonesia wants to include illegal fishing in a U.N. convention on transnational crime, in order to bring anti-money-laundering tools to bear on the problem.The government is intent on ending poaching and unsustainable fishing, and has already made waves for its public policy of seizing and scuttling illegal foreign fishing boats operating in its waters.Indonesian waters represent one of the world’s largest capture fisheries. JAKARTA — Indonesia is lobbying the United Nations to allow governments worldwide to pursue money-laundering charges against illegal fishing operators, in a bid to crack down on the practice more forcefully.The Indonesian government on Monday proposed that illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing be included in the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC). Indonesia ratified the convention in 2008.The UNTOC, also known as the Palermo Convention, deliberately omits the classification of transnational crimes to allow room for the inclusion of new types of transnational crimes. In theory, this could include IUU fishing, which, if successfully designated a transnational crime, could be tackled through anti-money-laundering processes.Susi Pudjiastuti, the Indonesian fisheries minister, “has in many global forums proclaimed that illegal fishing should be designated [in the UNTOC] as a transnational organized fishery crime,” said Mas Achmad Santosa, an investigator from the ministry’s illegal fishing prevention task force, as quoted by local news portal Tempo.The proposal comes in response to what the ministry sees as obstacles to investigating the funders of foreign vessels that fish in the country’s rich oceans. In November 2014, a month after his inauguration, President Joko Widodo slapped a moratorium on foreign fishing vessels from operating in Indonesian waters, home to one of the world’s largest capture fisheries. The policy has since been followed by the seizure and scuttling of such vessels, which has drawn mixed responses worldwide.In October 2015, the ministry joined forces with Indonesia’s anti-money laundering agency, known as the PPATK, to look into the financial backers behind the illegal fishing operations.“The issue is quite complicated when the case involves foreign vessels, because the owner is outside Indonesia,” Achmad said as quoted by Tempo.Another hurdle is the fact that the fisheries ministry lacks the authority to carry out a criminal investigation into money laundering, said senior ministry official Muhammad Yusuf. Under Indonesian law, only the police, the Attorney General’s Office, the customs department and the national anti-corruption commission, known as the KPK, may pursue such investigations.“But we keep communicating [about the issue] with the KPK and PPATK,” Yusuf said.Banner image: Yu Feng, a Taiwanese-flagged fishing vessel suspected of illegal fishing activity, off the coast of Sierra Leone prior to being boarded by U.S. Coast Guard officers in August 2009. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Public Affairs Specialist 2nd Class Shawn Eggert/Released)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Conservation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Illegal Fishing, Organized Crime center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

How a hunger for teeth is driving a bat toward extinction

first_imgBat teeth are more valuable than paper money on the island of Makira, in the eastern Solomon Islands.The use of bat teeth as a currency means that bats on the island are commonly hunted. One species, the Makira flying fox, is found only on the island and is being threatened with extinction due to human pressures.In addition to direct hunting, human population growth and logging are also threatening the bats.To save the species, researchers recommend developing quotas for sustainable harvesting, as well as an outreach campaign connecting the survival of this key piece of Makiran culture with the need to conserve the bats. On the island of Makira, in the eastern Solomon Islands, bat teeth are more valuable than paper money. But their use as a currency has contributed to widespread hunting of flying foxes and is driving one species toward extinction. Now, conservationists are trying to use this local tradition to save the bats and build local support for their conservation.Known to some as the “forgotten island,” Makira attracts few tourists. Those that make the trek do so primarily to see its rare and endemic birds, such as the rare yellow-legged pigeon (Columba pallidiceps), white-headed fruit dove (Ptilinopus eugeniae) and endangered chestnut-bellied imperial pigeon (Ducula brenchleyi). The island’s mammals, reptiles and amphibians are poorly understood by comparison.Researchers Tyrone Lavery and John Fasi, who was born in Makira, surveyed 197 Makirans to learn why they hunt the bats. While the bats are mainly hunted for food, their teeth are more valuable to the Makirans than the paper money of the Solomon Islands, according to the results of the study, published in Oryx on Oct. 16. The teeth are strung into necklaces or bracelets and exchanged during significant cultural events such as weddings, or to apologize and settle disputes.Two species of flying fox live on Makira; one, the Makira flying fox (Pteropus cognatus), is only found on this island and is considered Vulnerable by the IUCN. Flying foxes are large, fruit-eating bats with dog-like faces. Globally, 31 of the 65 species of flying fox are dangerously close to extinction. Twenty-eight of these threatened species are found only on islands, where they play vital ecological roles.A Makira flying fox (Pteropus cognatus) hangs from a branch. Photo by Tyrone LaveryA Makiran girl shows off a bat-tooth necklace. Photo by Tyrone LaveryFlying foxes are considered ecosystem engineers. As consumers of nectar and fruit they pollinate and spread the seeds of the plants they feed on. Hurricanes can level entire forests on Pacific islands like Makira, but the fruit- and nectar-eating bats help forests regenerate by dispersing seeds and pollinating flowers.Makira’s population is growing by 2 percent annually as of 2016, which has increased hunting pressures on the flying foxes that many Makirans rely on as a source of protein. The communal roosting habits of the flying foxes make them vulnerable to mass killing by Makirans searching for food both for themselves and to sell in markets.Hunting represents the most imminent threat to the flying foxes of the island, Lavery said. But habitat loss is also affecting them as foreign logging companies continue to tighten their grip on the island’s extensive but finite forest resources. Lavery told Mongabay that eight logging companies, mostly from Asia, currently operate approximately 14 camps on the island. Logging companies routinely violate environmental regulations on the island — for example, felling trees too close to rivers, failing to construct proper roadways, and logging at altitudes above 400 meters (1,300 feet), which is prohibited by law. The reliance of many Makirans on the forest for food and water means the negative effects of logging — polluted rivers, loss of forest-dwelling wildlife, and increased flooding — force Makirans off lands that have provided for them for generations.Satellite data from the University of Maryland show logging roads penetrating into Makira’s forests. Data source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, accessed through Global Forest WatchSatellite imagery of expansion of logging roads between early 2016 and late 2017 in southern Makira. Images from Planet LabsA logging road cuts through forest on Makira. Photo by Tyrone LaveryA sign tries to discourage logging of a Makiran forest. Photo by Tyrone LaveryA tree felled along a logging road in the Solomon Islands. Photo by Tyrone LaveryThe most obvious way to save the bats is to ban hunting, but researchers say that the cultural significance of the bat teeth combined with the bats’ value as a food source means this approach is unlikely to be successful. In 2010, an international conservation group paid locals on another of the Solomon Islands to stop hunting dolphins for their teeth, which are also used as currency. But by 2013, hunting had resumed and the price per tooth had risen dramatically, motivating additional hunting.Any effort to conserve flying foxes on Makira will require ongoing local support to succeed. Instead of a ban on hunting, the researchers recommend developing quotas for sustainable harvesting of the flying foxes, as well as an outreach campaign connecting the survival of this key piece of Makiran culture with the need to conserve the bats.“You have to convince people in a different way,” Fasi said. “You can’t just use figures and facts. Appeal to something that makes sense and is important to them.” He added that the pitch to Makirans should be simple: “If you hunt the bats into extinction, a part of your culture will go extinct too.”“The great thing about Tyrone’s work is that it looks at Western models of capitalism and conservation and recognizes that they’re not always the right things to appeal to,” said Nathan Whitmore, a biologist working in Papua New Guinea with the Wildlife Conservation Society, who was not involved in the study.A plume of sediment washes from a Makiran river into the ocean. Deforestation often increases erosion, which can sully water sources. Photo by Tyrone LaveryThe next step in developing a long-term conservation plan for flying foxes on Makira is to conduct population surveys to establish baselines for sustainable harvesting. By virtue of its status as the “forgotten island,” Makira may have enough time to curb the negative effects of population growth and logging with strategic interventions.But Lavery is somber when asked what the future may hold for wildlife on Makira.“So far the only extinctions we’ve documented have been due to introduced species like feral cats,” he said. “But that will probably change fairly quickly in the coming decades with the increasing population and logging.” Citation:Tyrone H. Lavery, John Fasi. Buying through your teeth: traditional currency and conservation of flying foxes Pteropus spp. in Solomon Islands. Oryx, 2017; 1FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Animals, Bats, Deforestation, Environment, forest degradation, Forest Loss, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Islands, Logging, Mammals, Rivers, Sustainability, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Moth rediscovered in Malaysia mimics appearance and behavior of bees to escape predators

first_imgThe Oriental blue clearwing (Heterosphecia tawonoides) was rediscovered in Malaysia’s Taman Negara National Park by Marta Skowron Volponi, a Ph.D. student at Poland’s University of Gdansk and lead author of a paper about the moth recently published in the journal Tropical Conservation Science.The moths have legs like bees, bright blue bands on their abdomens (bees in Southeast Asia can be a variety of colors, including blue), and furry bodies that resemble those of bees — though the moths’ “fur” is actually elongated scales.While the conservation status of the moths is unknown, Skowron Volponi found that the Oriental blue clearwing’s preferred habitat seems to be the banks of clean watercourses flowing through the primary rainforests of Malaysia — a country with one of the highest deforestation rates in the world. Polish researchers have rediscovered a moth in Malaysia that was previously known only from a 130-year-old museum specimen collected in Indonesia.The Oriental blue clearwing (Heterosphecia tawonoides) was rediscovered in Malaysia’s Taman Negara National Park by Marta Skowron Volponi, a Ph.D. student at Poland’s University of Gdansk and lead author of a paper about the moth recently published in the journal Tropical Conservation Science.When Skowron Volponi first encountered the Oriental blue clearwing and noticed the blue sheen of the moth’s wings as well as its reflective, metallic blue scales, she knew right away that the discovery was unique. She and co-author Paolo Volponi (Skowron Volponi’s husband) have now observed 12 Oriental blue clearwing individuals in the wild.Clearwing moths are known for their bee-mimicking appearances, and the Oriental blue clearwing is no exception. They have legs like bees, bright blue bands on their abdomens (bees in Southeast Asia can be a variety of colors, including blue), and furry bodies that resemble those of bees — though the moths’ “fur” is actually elongated scales. By assuming the appearance of and fraternizing with bees, Skowron Volponi theorized, clearwing moths are probably better able to evade predators who fear getting a stinger in the mouth when what they’re looking for is a good meal.“You think about moths and you envision a grey, hairy insect that is attracted to light,” Skowron Volponi said in a statement. “But this species is dramatically different — it is beautiful, shiny blue in sunlight and it comes out during the day; and it is a master of disguise, mimicking bees on multiple levels and even hanging out with them. The Oriental blue clearwing is just two centimeters in size, but there are so many fascinating things about them and so much more we hope to learn.”In fact, the Oriental blue clearwing not only looks and behaves like a bee, but may even buzz like a bee. In the Tropical Science Conservation paper, Skowron Volponi and her co-author detail a behavior known as “mud-puddling,” which they observed male clearwing moths engaging in: While flying amongst groups of bees and wasps from rock to rock on a riverbank, the moths suck up water and sodium with their proboscises (which they give as a “nuptial gift” to females as part of their mating rituals). Skowron Volponi says she also witnessed Oriental blue clearwings imitating a bee’s flight path by flying in zigzag patterns, and even heard them buzzing. This latter finding is still unconfirmed, but if additional research bears it out, it would be a first for clearwing moths.“This is one of those rediscoveries that reminds us of how incredibly fascinating our wild world is and gives us the unique opportunity to learn about a species that would otherwise have been doomed to obscurity in the basement of a museum,” Don Church, president of United States-based NGO Global Wildlife Conservation, said in a statement. “Now we get the chance to unlock this species’ mysteries and help look at opportunities to protect it.”Church was not involved in the research, but Global Wildlife Conservation was mentioned in the Tropical Science Conservation study because Heterosphecia tawonoides fits the organization’s description of a “lost species.” Though it was described to science in 2003, the basis for that description was a single specimen collected in Sumatra, Indonesia in 1887 that has since been housed at the Natural History Museum in Vienna, Austria.Global Wildlife Conservation, with the aid of experts from more than 100 IUCN Species Survival Commission Specialist Groups, launched a project called The Search for Lost Species that aims to rediscover and protect species that haven’t been seen by scientists in a decade or more.While the conservation status of the moths is unknown, Skowron Volponi found that the Oriental blue clearwing’s preferred habitat seems to be the banks of clean watercourses flowing through the primary rainforests of Malaysia — a country with one of the highest deforestation rates in the world. And while she found the moth primarily in Taman Negara National Park, she did come across some individuals of the species outside of the protected area, as well.“When they chop down the trees and the first monsoon rains come, there are mudslides and everything is flooded into the river, which brings mud and pollution into the national park,” Skowron Volponi said. “While people at first may not think that a sandy bank of a river is a diverse habitat, the reality is that this is precious real estate for clearwing moths, bees, and wonderful day-flying butterflies that are often endangered. Once those riverbanks vanish, so too will all of these species, including my favorites, the clearwing moths.”The rediscovered Oriental blue clearwing. Photo Credit: Marta Skowron Volponi.CITATION• Skowron Volponi, M. A., & Volponi, P. (2017). A 130-Year-Old Specimen Brought Back to Life: A Lost Species of Bee-Mimicking Clearwing Moth, Heterosphecia tawonoides (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae: Osminiini), Rediscovered in Peninsular Malaysia’s Primary Rainforest. Tropical Conservation Science, 10. doi:10.1177/1940082917739774 Animal Behavior, Animals, Biodiversity, Environment, Insects, Moths, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rediscovered Species, Research, Wildlife Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Akshay Kumars son gets black belt in kudo

first_imgMumbai, May 8 (PTI) Akshay Kumar is proud that his son Aarav bagged the first degree black belt in kudo, a Japanese martial art sport.The “Airlift” star, 48, took to Twitter to post an image of his 13-year-old son wearing a blue uniform with a black belt.”Its a #SonDay all d way!After 9 yrs of training my son got his 1st degree black belt in Kudo #proudfather #overjoyed,” he wrote.For Aaravs mother Twinkle, it was the best Mothers Day gift.”The biggest Mothers Day gift! Just got the news from his camp-All the years of nagging have paid off #BlackBelt,” she wrote.Akshay, who is himself a martial art expert, and Twinkle are proud parents to Aarav and daughter Nitara. PTI NDS NDSlast_img

10 months agoNice chief Julien Fournier a target for Southampton

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Nice chief Julien Fournier a target for Southamptonby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNice chief Julien Fournier is a target for Southampton.The Daily Mail says Fournier, the general manager of French club Nice, is lined up to be the next director of football at Southampton.The vastly experienced 44-year-old who played a key role in persuading Patrick Vieira to become Nice’s manager, has worked previously as secretary general of Marseille and was the youngest president of Strasbourg.Southampton sacked Les Reed as vice-chairman in November and technical director Martin Hunter.The club’s Chinese owner, Gao Jisheng and his family, who took control in the summer of last year, have been working on a restructure of the club after appointing highly-rated Ralph Hasenhuttl as manager. last_img read more

BC Appeal Court gives Ottawa more time to fix solitary confinement law

first_imgVANCOUVER — The British Columbia Court of Appeal has given the federal government more time to fix its solitary confinement law after a lower court declared the law unconstitutional last year.The B.C. Supreme Court ruling last January gave Ottawa a year to enact replacement legislation, and the Appeal Court has now extended the deadline to June 17, with conditions to protect prisoners’ constitutional rights in the meantime.Those conditions include that health-care professionals must complete daily visual observations of inmates in solitary confinement and advise the institutional head within 24 hours if they believe the inmate must be removed from segregation.The B.C. Civil Liberties Association and the John Howard Society of Canada launched the legal challenge, and the two groups also oppose a bill introduced in October that the government says would limit solitary confinement to 22 hours or fewer per day.The bill would allow segregated prisoners to spend four hours a day outside their cells, with a minimum of two hours to interact with others, but it does not include hard caps on how many days or months prisoners could be isolated from the general population.The Canadian Civil Liberties Association launched a separate case against solitary confinement in Ontario, and the Court of Appeal in that province has given the federal government until April 30 to enact new legislation.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Bail set at 1 mn for US actress accused in bribery scandal

first_imgLos Angeles: US actress Lori Loughlin appeared in federal court in downtown Los Angeles in connection with a massive college admissions scam involving other celebrities and top industry CEOs. Bail for the “Full House” star was set at USD 1 million, the same amount as for her husband, designer Mossimo Giannulli, who has also been charged in the case. The couple, who are to appear in federal court in Boston on March 29, allegedly paid USD 500,000 in bribes to ensure their two daughters were recruited to the University of Southern California rowing team even though the pair did not participate in crew. Also Read – Imran Khan arrives in China, to meet Prez Xi JinpingLoughlin, 54, surrendered to FBI agents early Wednesday after returning from Vancouver, where she was filming. Judge Steve Kim told the star in setting her bail that she would still be allowed to travel for work as long as the court was made aware of her plans. The couple were among 50 people indicted on Tuesday in a scam to help children of the American elite gain entry into top US colleges. “Desperate Housewives” star Felicity Huffman, who has also been implicated in the scandal, was arrested by FBI agents at her home on Tuesday and later released on bail. Also Read – US blacklists 28 Chinese entities over abuses in XinjiangThe 56-year-old actress and her husband William H Macy, the star of Showtime’s hit series “Shameless,” allegedly paid USD 15,000 for their eldest daughter to perform well on a college entrance exam. Macy was mentioned in the case but has not been charged. The ringleader behind the scam, William “Rick” Singer, who authorities say was paid about USD 25 million dollars to bribe coaches and university administrators, has pleaded guilty and is cooperating with authorities. Some of the universities targeted in the elaborate cheating scam include Yale, Stanford, UCLA and Georgetown. None of the schools or the students has been charged in the case. According to prosecutors, the accused parents paid a firm run by Singer as much as USD 6 million to cheat on college entrance exams for their children or to bribe coaches to help non-athletic students get scholarships. Others ensnared in the scandal include Gordon Caplan, co-chairman of New York law firm Willkie Farr & Gallagher, who allegedly paid USD 75,000 to have his daughter’s test grades fixed. Also charged is William McGlashan, an executive at the investment group TPG Capital who specialized in technology investments. He allegedly paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to ensure his son got into the University of Southern California as a student athlete. The scandal has lit up social media, with many poking fun and expressing anger at the wealthy parents indicted notably Loughlin and Huffman as well as their children. “CAPTION THIS: ‘It’s ok honey. We’ll get you in a college close to your mom’s prison so you can visit,” one Twitter user said in response to a picture Huffman had posted on Sunday of her daughter sitting on Macy’s lap and hugging him. Ben Dreyfuss, the son of veteran actor Richard Dreyfuss, quipped: “I got into college the old fashioned way: by letting my father’s celebrity speak for itself.” Another Twitter user said: “So what I’ve learned from #CollegeCheatingScandal is that rich kids are so stupid that they can’t get into colleges without cheating.” Olivia Jade Giannulli, one of Loughlin’s daughters, disabled comments on her Instagram posts on Wednesday after some of her 1.3 million followers lashed out against her. “Please do a video for how you prepared for the SATs,” read one comment. Another berated the young woman, who posted a video blog last year in which she said she didn’t care about school, for stealing a college spot from “another deserving student (who probably actually rows!!)…”last_img read more

Cyclone Fani Odisha likely to start evacuation on May 2

first_imgBhubaneswar: The Odisha government is likely to begin the evacuation of people affected by cyclone Fani from May 2 as the severe cyclonic storm is heading to make a landfall on the state’s coast, an official said here on Tuesday. The state government has also asked the concerned district collectors in the coastal regions to remain prepared to meet any eventuality. “The cyclone is currently headed northwest and after May 1, according to the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD), it will recurve and move towards Odisha. By late evening on May 3, the cyclone is expected to make landfall near Puri. However, the IMD informed that this too is expected to change,” said Special Relief Commissioner (SRC) Bishnupada Sethi. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra Singh “If the cyclone makes landfall in Odisha on the evening of May 3, we will start evacuating the affected people on May 2.” As many as 879 cyclone shelters were already set up. Besides, 20 Odisha Disaster Rapid Action Force (ODRAF) units, 335 fire services and 12 NDRF units were on standby. Fani could become an ‘extremely severe cyclone’ by Wednesday, said the IMD. It predicted that after May 2, south-coastal Odisha and adjacent districts will receive heavy to very rainfall. Thereafter, on May 3 and 4, coastal and interior Odisha is also likely to receive extremely heavy downpours, while wind speed may touch 170 km per hour.last_img read more

Egypt Brotherhood vows protests despite terror listing

first_imgCAIRO – A leader of the Muslim Brotherhood vowed that the movement would keep up protests after Egypt’s military-installed government designated it a “terrorist” group on Wednesday.“The protests will continue, certainly,” Ibrahim Munir, a member of the group’s top guidance council who is in exile in London, told AFP, adding the government’s decision was “illegitimate.”last_img

St Louis upset of Memphis headlines NCAA Tournament action at Nationwide Arena

Day one of the NCAA Tournament in Columbus Friday did not disappoint. Midwest No.11-seed North Carolina State, Midwest No. 3-seed Georgetown, West No.9-seed Saint Louis and West No.1-seed Michigan State all won, advancing to the third round. Georgetown and N.C. State is scheduled to meet in the first game at Nationwide Arena at 12:15 p.m. Sunday, with MSU and SLU 30 minutes following, with berths to the Sweet 16 on the line. Midwest Region’s No. 11-seed North Carolina State upsets No. 6 Seed San Diego State, 79-65 Playing in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2006, the No. 11-seeded North Carolina State Wolfpack (23-12) upended No. 6-seed San Diego State (26-8), taking advantage of its superior play in the paint on the way to a 79-65 victory. N.C. State got a team-high 22 points from junior forward Richard Howell, and sophomore guard Lorenzo Brown added 17 while grabbing nine rebounds. “I thought today inside around the basket we were able to get a lot done,” N.C. State coach Mark Gottfried said. “And I thought Richard (Powell) in the first half was just sensational. And it wasn’t just him. But Richard really set the tone for us offensively.” It was a two-man show for SDSU, as sophomore guard Jamaal Franklin (23) and junior guard Chase Tapley (19), combined for 42 of the Aztecs’ 65 points. SDSU coach Steve Fisher attributed the loss to N.C. State’s size. “It’s one thing to be big. It’s another thing to be big and good. And they’re big and good. And we had a hard time with their size,” he said. N.C. State outscored the Aztecs’ 38-18 in the paint. During the first half, neither team was able to pull away, with the lead changing six times and N.C. State on top, 33-29, after twenty minutes. The beginning of the second half was more of the same, but towards the midway point, SDSU started to miss shots, and NCST didn’t. The Wolfpack shot 65 percent from the field in the final twenty minutes, with the Aztecs only managing to hit 37 percent of their second-half shots. Midwest Region’s No. 3-seed Georgetown defeats No. 14-seed Belmont, 74-59 Georgetown and senior guard Jason Clark weren’t going to be denied this time. After being one-and-done in their previous two NCAA Tournament trips, the No.3-seeded Hoyas, propelled by Clark, played with insistence Friday, cruising past No.14-seed Belmont, 74-59, in the second round. Clark led the way for Georgetown (24-8), pouring in a game-high 21 points, while Hoyas’ freshman forward Otto Porter scored 16 and senior center Henry Sims added 15. Sophomore forward Blake Jenkins dropped a team-high 17 points for Belmont (27-8). “I think it was definitely a sense of urgency, not just for me but the whole team,” Clark said. “We know what we’ve done in the past. So it was a big thing for us to get this win today.” The urgency showed early, as Clark scored 10 of Georgetown’s first 14 points. Along with Clark’s play, the Hoyas’ used a major size advantage inside to take a 36-27 lead into half time. The lead remained around the 10-point mark for the majority of the second half. Belmont coach Rick Byrd said his team was not able to make any runs against the Hoyas’ zone defense. “I just didn’t predict that we’d face zone or that we’d do as poorly as we did,” he said. “But (Georgetown’s zone is) a great one. They’re well taught, and they’ve got great athletes.” Georgetown’s efficiency on the offensive end allowed it to stave off any Belmont runs as well. The Hoyas shot 61 percent from the field, including nearly 70 percent in the final 20 minutes. West Region’s No. 9-seed Saint Louis beats No.8-seed Memphis, 61-54 In the most competitive game of the day, No.9-seed Saint Louis (26-7) held all but one No. 8-seed Memphis (26-9) player to single-digit points in a 61-54 victory. Billikens junior guard Kwamain Mitchell led all scorers with 22, and SLU senior forward Brian Conklin played tough inside against bigger Memphis defenders, adding 16 points. Conference USA Player of the Year Will Barton was the only Tiger in double-digits with 16 points. Memphis sophomore forward Tarik Black, who Barton said Thursday was the Tigers’ biggest advantage heading into the game, was held to four points and only played 19 minutes due to foul trouble. SLU frustrated the Tigers by preventing them from getting out and running. “Honestly, they didn’t even – they didn’t have nobody on offensive boards, just one guy, and the rest of their players got back on defense,” Memphis sophomore guard Joe Jackson said. “So they basically took away the fast break, and we played into their hands, just settling for bad shots.” The first half saw back-and-forth play with the teams tied, 23-23, after 20 minutes. SLU held Memphis to 33 percent shooting, 1-of-8 from 3-point range in the first half. “To keep (Memphis) to 23 points in a half is really good, but look, that’s what we pride ourselves on is our defense,” SLU junior forward Cody Ellis said. Memphis used a 7-2 run early in the second half to get up 37-29, thanks in part to a few steals by Barton and sophomore guard Chris Crawford. The Billikens followed with a 14-5 run of their own. After a long, shot-clock beating three pointer by Mitchell, SLU led, 48-44, with fewer than five minutes to play, and held on for the victory. “We could have given up and went down, 10, 15 points, but the guys kept fighting back, making big shots and knocking down key free throws,” SLU sophomore forward Dwayne Evans said, who scored six points and grabbed 11 rebounds. West Region’s No.1-seed Michigan State beats West No.16-seed LIU Brooklyn, 89-67 It was closer than expected for the first 25 minutes, but eventually, No.1-seed Michigan State (28-7) proved why it is a top-seed, as the Spartans topped the No.16-seeded LIU Brooklyn Blackbirds (25-9), 89-67. MSU senior forward Draymond Green led the way with a triple-double, pouring in 24 points while adding 12 rebounds and 10 assists. Spartans’ centers sophomore Adrien Payne (16 points and seven rebounds) and junior Derrick Nix (18 points and eight rebounds)-combined for 34 points and 15 rebounds. “Those guys are monsters. They’re really good players and they’re really skilled. That’s why they’re a No.1 seed,” LIU Brooklyn coach Jim Ferry said, LIU Brooklyn jumped out to a five-point lead early, but it didn’t last long, as the Spartans started to feed their bigs, exploiting the Blackbirds lack of size inside. Greeen, Payne and Nix combined for 24 points and 16 rebounds in the first half, as the Spartans scored 34 of their 42 first-half points in the paint. A balanced attack kept LIU Brooklyn in the game, with eight different players scoring in the first twenty minutes. MSU led, 42-37, at the end of the first half. The Blackbirds held strong early in the second half, but a 28-12 run by MSU allowed the Spartans to cruise for the majority of the game’s final minutes. “It was a big win for us, on a team that I think is a very solid, good team. I was concerned (early), but I thought we took control in the second half,” MSU coach Tom Izzo said. read more