Perea, the outstanding patch in the weak point of Cádiz

first_imgFrom the first day there was a fixed position. In the first four days he scored three goals that made him take gallons. Without a doubt he is in his best football season. At this point, he has five goals, his best record in Second. These goals have allowed to add six more points to the yellows. He has also intervened directly in two more goals, with two assists; and it is the third most shooting in Cádiz, with 41 shots; only behind Choco Lozano, with 49; and Álex, 43. For much of the season, Álvaro Cervera has demanded the need to sign a left winger. The coach, a lover of counterattack soccer and fast sideline players, has made it clear in more than one intervention that Cádiz would greatly improve with the addition of a left-handed winger, since the team does not have any player in this area; and if two right-handed (Salvi and Alejo). Despite the fact that this signing did not take place, Cervera placed Perea in this position, where it has had more than optimal performance. But if anything Perea is standing out this season, it is in the dribbles. In Cádiz no one overflows more than him. In the global, He is the fourth player in Second that dribbles the most (128) and fifth in successful dribbles (65). Both classifications are commanded by Enzo Lombardo, from Racing. To this we must add that He is the third player from Cádiz, who receives the most fouls, 47; surpassed only by Álex (66) and Alejo (50). As for the passes completed, it has a high success rate (81.6%). He has given 449 good out of 550 attempted.The ’10’ of Cádiz has been in the yellow team for three seasons. Last year he was transferred to Extremadura in the winter market, where he was a permanent and helped the Catalans achieve permanence. Perea, whenever he has had the opportunity, has declared his love for Cádiz. Two weeks ago he had a digital meeting with the yellow fans, in which he made his intention clear: “I hope I retire in Cádiz, but in the First Division.”last_img read more

Peru: the man who overcomes fear to defend the forest

first_imgAmazon Logging, Conservation, Deforestation, Timber Article published by Romina Castagnino The vice president of the Tambopata National Reserve management committee has reported invasions and threats on several occasions.Demetrio Pacheco says that he has found burned and fallen trees inside his concession. MADRE DE DIOS, Peru – It is 6:28 in the evening and everything is already dark in the middle of the rainforest of Madre de Dios, in the south of Peru. I’m about to go to sleep after having talked all day with Demetrio Pacheco. He told me about his love for the forest, about his life, the death threats he has been receiving in recent months, and the bullet he found on the table.“You are not afraid?” I asked.“Yes, of course,” he answered.(Long silence)“How can you sleep here?” I tell him.“Since the last time they threatened me with death, this is the first time I’ve stayed here,” he said.I look at the clock. It’s 6:32. Only four minutes have passed. Ten more hours until sunrise.When the sun hides in the jungle, the darkness becomes more intense and the mood turns serious. Crickets, bats, frogs, birds and hundreds of insects seem to gossip all night, like an endless murmur. An echo that can lull you to sleep, but also bring you closer to your deepest fears. But sleeping with fear is like not sleeping at all. Any sound can wake you up. The rain slowly and mysteriously approaches. The wind is mistaken for a jaguar’s roar or a group of tapir or white-lipped peccary searching for food. Everything can disturb you when you live with fear. Even worse, when you want to see, everything around you is pitch dark.People are entering and invading the concession from several directions, says Pacheco. Photo by Jack Lo for MongabayA peasant who fightsDemetrio Pacheco is the lieutenant governor of the Association of Agricultural Producers San Juan, vice president of the management committee of the Tambopata National Reserve and president of the Association of Forestry Concessions of Reforestation of Madre de Dios. He is a father of four children and has been married for more than 30 years. His hands, rough like sandpaper and hard like a shovel, are representative of his life working the land. Currently, Pacheco has a Forestry Concession for Reforestation of a little more than 800 hectares (1,976.84 acres), at kilometer 70 of the Interoceanic Highway. There, just one hour from Puerto Maldonado, life is becoming a game of Russian roulette.Demetrio Pacheco in his concession. In this area, they burned everything and then planted banana. A crop that grows fast, so invaders use it to file charges against the concessionaires for alleged land use change. Photo by Jack Lo for MongabayEven past his 60, Pacheco keeps walking at a steady pace and appears to be analyzing you at all times. His time in the Army working on intelligence issues made him more curious, daring and outspoken but also distrustful and very analytical.He remembers everything. He writes everything down. He takes pictures of everything.Pacheco has had a varied life. Born in the heights of the Moquegua region, in Carumas, a Peruvian district located more than 3,000 meters above sea level with a little more than 5,000 inhabitants, according to population projection and geographical location studies by the National Institute of Statistics and Information (also known by its acronym in Spanish, INEI).The people of Carumas are farmers or ranchers who live among green hills, deep canyons and crystal-clear waters. As a boy, Pacheco helped his parents farm mainly potatoes, barley and corn. He also became an expert farmer looking after the sheep, goats, cows, donkeys and horses they had at home.When he turned 18, he joined the Army. When he finished his compulsory military service he moved to Arequipa to study business management at a local institute. It was there, at only 20 years old where he realized that if he wanted to progress and make the most of his life he had to do everything he could.He got a job reading the newspaper to a terminally ill patient; he took on the challenge without thinking twice. Then he was a gardener at a colonial house in one of the most affluent districts of the city. His knowledge of farming meant that he had no problems looking after some grass and flowers. When he felt he needed more money to continue studying, he also mended shoes and made leather key chains at night. Everything changed for Pacheco one Sunday when he reunited with a fellow student that had suddenly stopped attending classes. It was a defining moment that changed the direction of his life.A trip to the jungleIn Madre de Dios there are several land defenders who are unwilling to surrender their fight. Víctor Zambrano, president of the Management Committee of the Tambopata National Reserve, is someone who fights for life in the southern Amazon region of Peru. When I asked about fear, he answers firmly.“I’m also a regular visitor of San Pedro,” Zambrano said. They look for me to threaten me, but at this point in my life, what can I do? I can’t go back. We already have our lives planned. We are never going to give up. We are a group of people who fight.”Zambrano was recognized in 2016 by the National Geographic Society as an anonymous leader in conservation and has also received recognition in Peruvian Congress for his commitment to the country, childhood and conservation.“Fear stays in the background,” he said. “What we defend is more important. The environment. Natural resources. We defend life, the generations that are to come and that we need to benefit. We can’t be afraid. That feeling is not part of our lives. And I’ve known Demetrio for decades since we started working for Madre de Dios. He is someone who will never give up.”Demetrio shows the bullet they found on the table of his camp. Image courtesy of Demetrio PachecoAt the end of November 2015, about 25 kilometers (about 15.5 miles) from Demetrio’s forestry concession, forestry concessionaire and environmental activist Alfredo Ernesto Vracko Neuenschwander, who confronted illegal miners, was murdered. The miners invaded his land at kilometer 93 of the Interoceanic Highway.Pacheco says that his son Carlos had a shotgun pointed at his chest in March of this year, something that was noted in a formal complaint. Days later, he adds, they found a bullet on their dining table and asked for protection.Demetrio Pacheco came by chance to Madre de Dios. Which brings us to Pacheco’s reunion with his friend in Arequipa. The friend explained his absence and showed Pacheco a small rock and several sheets of gold. In that moment, Pacheco knew that if he finds gold he would be able to pay for his studies.Pacheco thought he would never return to the classroom. It was the end of the 70s and Puerto Maldonado was a small town full of free land that was populated by people from Cusco, Arequipa, Puno and Moquegua in search of a place where “there was nobody.” It took him more than a week to arrive and walk in the jungle for the first time. He started working with his friend’s partners. According to Pacheco, in those times the artisanal miners were more conscious about the environment.They did not cut down the forest; they only worked on the beaches that were formed next to the Madre de Dios River, in a calm, peaceful way and without harming the environment.After a while, in 1982, he convinced his parents to move to the rainforest. Later, they asked the government for a Reforestation Concession — which is the one he currently manages — and left mining.“Seeing the trees grow and working the land attracted me more,” Demetrio says as he walks through his 835-hectare concession and begins to show me banana plantations, 30-meter-burned trees and the remains of camps which people — invaders according to Demetrio — have left behind.With his eyes overflowing with tears, he points out fallen and burned chestnut trees. He desperately searches for the fruits. “Look what they have done,” he tells me angrily.Who maintains order?Since 2012, Demetrio Pacheco has reported seven invasions into his concession and threats for illegal logging, burning of primary forest, cutting down chestnut trees — which are considered a flagship product of Madre de Dios — for depredation of secondary forest, destruction of forest regeneration and for usurpation of rights.“I have all my papers in order, but it seems that the authorities support those who commit crimes,” he said. “They ignore the complaints. This mafia continues to threaten, invade and destroy all concessions.”Pacheco says that those who invade his land also go to the Agency for the Supervision of Forest Resources and Wildlife (also known by its acronym in Spanish, Osinfor) to file charges against him for alleged land use change. Osinfor visits and verifies a change of land use, and penalizes the concessionaires with massive fines. No investigation is opened. He said the agrarian institute then validates these false associations, and that he’s even had his work tools destroyed.Burned Brazil nuts. Pacheco holds them with sadness. Photo by Jack Lo for MongabayIn the office of the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (also known by its Spanish acronym, SPDA) in Puerto Maldonado, Eddy Peña says more order is needed.“Audits are not done in the best way,” he said. Peña is an agronomist who specializes in the native communities’ conservation, and is part of the technical team of the SPDA in Madre de Dios. “Osinfor, what do they do? They arrive at the site, inspect the concession and, without any contemplation, impose extremely disproportionate fines. It is normal for people to feel discouraged and helpless.”A burned Brazil nut tree. Photo by Jack Lo for MongabayAt the Osinfor headquarters located in Lima, they also say they are very worried about this situation.“There is inaction by the prosecutor’s office and the regional government,” said Ildefonzo Riquelme, director of the Forestry and Wildlife Supervision Division of Osinfor. “Even though we identify the invaders, we can’t sanction them.” In effect, Riquelme says responsibility for sanctions lies with the prosecutor’s office and the regional government. He also says claims against Pacheco were cleared.“He was reported twice,” Riquelme said. “We traveled in 2013 and 2016 to verify. We quickly realized that he was not breaking his contract, but that others were damaging his forest. That is why, in his case, we didn’t fine him.”Riquelme points out that fines for concessionaires who do not comply with forest protection laws can amount up to over $1,200 and adds that the lack of budget in the regional governments is the main excuse for not being effective.“As they don’t have money, they fall into shady acts that prevent things from improving,” Riquelme said. “The issue is people and their will. Everything is justified by money. The police themselves tell us that there are police officials who have also been contaminated with all of this. We are aware of everything that happens and that fines can be disproportionate in many cases, but we are working to make sanctions more and more just and fair.”However, Carlos Alberto Salazar, responsible for the area of ​​planning and budget of the Regional Directorate of Forestry and Wildlife of the Regional Government of Madre de Dios tells Mongabay that there is just no money for the work.“When the functions of forestry control were transferred to the regional government it unfortunately didn’t come with a budget,” Salazar said. “We don’t have resources and our work is scarce. However, we try to make alliances with other organizations. We try to work well, but imagine, a few days ago they also invaded the livestock center of the regional government. Nobody is safe. It is very difficult for us to police everyone.”In Demetrio Pacheco’s concession, there are a variety of trees: achiguas (Huberodendron swietenoides), fine-leaf wadara (Couratari guianensis), moenas (Qualea paraensis), pashacos (Macrolobium acaciaefolium), tornillos ( and tall Brazil nut trees (Bertholletia excels), but unfortunately, they have been burned and knocked down before 2012. There have been years of constant struggle, and the forest has been weakened.Inside the concession he still has a primary forest from which he continues to take resources and reforest afterward. It is a completely different panorama. Photo by Jack Lo for MongabayThe office of the National Forestry and Wildlife Agency (also known by its acronym in Spanish, Serfor) in Lima is the government agency responsible for combating deforestation and illegal trafficking of forest resources.“We understand the importance of the matter and share the concern to these complaints which must be managed through the Public Prosecutor’s Office with the appropriate support of the police force and the regional authority,” a Serfor spokesperson wrote in an email. “Even more so now that there is an initiated process in the aforementioned prosecutor’s office, they claim for the sentence.”In addition, they add that “for this reason, the Regional Government of Madre de Dios was also informed of the opened process in the Public Prosecutor’s Office, and through an official enquiry they requested that in view of the transferred forest competences, they report on the actions implemented in this case —given that the verification proceedings were carried out— and although precautionary measures have been issued, they have not been implemented and the eviction of the occupied areas have not been carried out.”“They even have the nerve to build,” says Demetrio. Photo by Jack Lo for MongabayMongabay contacted Americo Bautista, the environmental prosecutor of Puerto Maldonado, to consult him about Pacheco’s and other concessionaires’ complaints in this part of the Interoceanic highway, but an interview could not be arranged. At Osinfor, Riquelme says that all regional governments have an agreement to share information with one another.Private citizens describe the situation is out of control.“The rule of law is upside down, and it does not help the citizen,” says Víctor Zambrano, who owns the first Private Conservation Area (ACP) of Madre de Dios which he christened with his daughter’s name K’erenda. “When the illegals file charges against the concessionaires, the authorities immediately run to verify the alleged crime. When the concessionaires make a denunciation, it stays on paper. We feel frustrated by the things that are happening, but we don’t have where else to go. The fight continues.” He has planted more than 20,000 trees in his concession, converting what was once pasture into a healthy forest.Zambrano’s statements and the situation in this region of Peru call the attention of the authorities in the Regional Government of Madre de Dios.Salazar says it’s a matter of policy control. “There is an inoperability of the authorities, not only here, but also from the central level. Everybody knows it, but what are they really doing? Maybe the regional authority in charge has other priorities, but there is a national forestry policy that is not met.”According to Pacheco, Peña and Zambrano, 43 concessionaires in the vicinity of the Interoceanic Highway between kilometers 65 and 80 have been impacted. According to Demetrio Pacheco, he has made several complaints.“The people living in the area where Pacheco lives are very vulnerable,” Eddy Peña said. “They are near La Pampa (mining center) and are close to the area allowed for mining. The biggest problem is that they are systematically invaded by a mafia of land dealers that are constituted in pseudo-associations of farmers which they register to obtain legal status.”Peña says concessions are illegally entered, areas are delimited for produce farms for mainly fast-growing banana, and after land-grabbers take possession they request the areas from the agrarian directorates. The weak response of the government and the complaints of the concessionaires form a vicious circle.“Some are already tired of fighting and have abandoned their concessions or have begun building relations with the mafias because they have no other choice,” he said.Salazar, from the Regional Forestry and Wildlife Directorate of the Regional Government of Madre de Dios, says there is a plan for a solution.“To avoid these overlays that are a consequence of the disorder that exists, we are going to launch 14 units of timber harvesting —these are the smallest administrative units used for planning and reporting the harvest of timber— to give greater security to the concessionaires,” Salazar said. “We are talking with Osinfor so that they can make their inspections faster.”La Pampa is the name of a mining center 30 kilometers (over 18 miles) from Demetrio’s concession. A cradle of illegality and chaos, it is located along the Interoceanic Highway, it is a social and environmental disaster. It’s a place where few can enter and where the mafias do what they want. There’s garbage everywhere, prostitution, fuel barrels and horrifying views of a desert that, until recently, was a forest.Cover photo by Jack Lo LauThis story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on July 7, 2017.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Portable DNA analysis tool identifies species on site to help combat wildlife crime

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri Distinguishing legally from illegally traded wildlife products using the size, shape and origin of the sample often fails when samples are of young individuals or wildlife parts, such as a teeth, bones, skins, seeds or powders.Rangers, police and port-of-entry officials can now use a portable DNA analysis tool to rapidly identify the species of plant and animal samples found on suspected smugglers.The developers hope the new LifeScanner Lab-In-A-Box system will help officials catch smugglers and better understand transit routes for trafficked wildlife and plant products. Each year, trafficking in wildlife parts earns international crime syndicates some $8 billion to $10 billion. The illegal timber trade brings in another estimated $7 billion, and illegal fishing $10 billion to $23 billion. The legal trade of these items is worth even more.Effective enforcement is contingent on police, customs and other officials being able to distinguish animal and plant products that can be traded legally from those that can’t. However, the typical traits that authorities look out for — size, shape, location and behavior —are often insufficient to tell species apart, especially if the samples are young individuals or animal parts, products, and processed samples, such as teeth, bones, skins, tusks, seeds or powders.Elephant herd in Tanzania. DNA analysis can identify ivory from African elephants, which is shipped illegally to Asia and difficult to distinguish from legally traded Asian elephant ivory. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriScientists and trade authorities have increasingly turned to the DNA of traded products to identify the associated species. They typically collect and send a sample of the plant, animal or its product to a laboratory for genetic analysis. Over the last decade, scientists have developed DNA barcoding, a technique that scans a short sequence from a standard part of the organism’s DNA and compares it to a database of sequences to see where it matches. Similar to how a supermarket scanner recognizes products using the black stripes of the Universal Product Code (UPC), DNA barcoding can associate a sample with a particular species for which samples already occur in the reference database.This technology is cutting-edge but can still take several days to return an answer, which is unfeasible for a real-world setting. Researchers have sought a way for frontline officials to rapidly analyze the DNA of plant or animal parts on-site, using portable equipment, and get a reliable result that can help tackle wildlife and timber trafficking.Barcoding for LifeThe international Barcode of Life (iBOL) initiative has developed a new portable DNA barcoding tool for port-of-entry officials that can identify the species of wildlife samples. The new LifeScanner Lab-In-A-Box portable DNA barcoding kit, presented this past month at the 7th International iBOL conference at Kruger National Park in South Africa, makes rapid species identification possible on site, within a few hours.Participants at the 7th International iBOL conference in South Africa get hands-on with the LifeScanner Lab-In-A-Box portable DNA analysis tool to rapidly identify the animal and plant species. Photo credit: University of JohannesburgThe iBOL initiative, based at the University of Guelph in Canada, has built and manages a DNA barcode reference library to enable species identification through DNA-based analysis. Launched in 2010, iBOL coordinates scientists in 25 countries that develop both the sequence library and the technology used to identify organisms rapidly and inexpensively through DNA barcoding.Scientists identify an animal species from a sample of its DNA using a specific gene, known as cytochrome c oxidase 1, or CO1, that they can match against the same gene in a DNA sequence from a known species.“The [CO1] region is selected as the barcode region because it has the closest concordance to the clusters we call species,” said the Smithsonian Institution’s David Schindel, director of the Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL), which provides outreach for iBOL. “The discontinuity between species corresponds to the discontinuity between DNA sequences.”CO1 can be compared across individuals within one species as well as across different species. Either comparison requires both an uncontaminated DNA sample from the animal in question and at least one known reference sample against which the gene can be compared.A reference library for DNA Officials using the new Lab-In-A-Box system will need access to such reference samples to be able to confirm whether the sample at hand has been illegally obtained or traded. DNA barcoding relies on reference databases, or libraries, for the reference samples that underpin the analysis.The LifeScanner Lab-In-A-Box, a portable DNA barcoding laboratory, is a new tool to help rangers, police, customs agents and other officials quickly determine whether wildlife samples are endangered, invasive or legally traded. Photo credit: Rob O’Flanagan, University of GuelphThe Lab-In-A-Box connects with the freely available Barcode of Life Data System (BOLD) online data storage and analysis platform. Developed at the Centre for Biodiversity Genomics in Canada, the BOLD database enables users to assemble, manage and analyze DNA barcode data together with information on species form and distribution.Scientists can store or search the main BOLD data portal containing several types of DNA-related records, including primers, electropherograms, images and DNA sequences. The reference set of DNA sequences allows a user to identify the species associated with a new, unfamiliar sequence. A user can also see maps of sequence sample origins, organize and view records by taxonomic category, share information, and even publish DNA barcode records. You can upload a sequence of DNA to the database, and it returns a species ID if it has that sequence in the database.As of Dec. 3, BOLD contained 7,958,596 specimens with records of some sort; nearly 6 million specimens with barcodes, representing almost 275,000 known species. The database includes a public access interface where anyone can search through 1.7 million of the records using multiple search criteria. So, for instance, you could search for all the records available for birds (Aves — it uses scientific names) in Vietnam or for just jaguars in Brazil.Statistics on the size and distribution of DNA data from the BOLD reference library and database, including nearly 6 million barcodes from over 273,000 species Image credit: International Barcode of LifeDNA analysis on the goThe key features of the new Lab-In-A-Box are its portability and the speed with which it can identify the species of a sample found on a suspected smuggler.To learn more about this system, Mongabay-Wildtech interviewed its creator, Sujeevan Ratnasingham, informatics director at the University of Guelph’s Centre for Biodiversity Genomics and chief architect of the BOLD database.Mongabay-Wildtech: What advances in barcoding, portability, or both, were needed to make the Lab-In-A-Box possible?Sujeevan Ratnasingham: A key advance was the miniaturization of sequences, achieved by Oxford Nanopore. In addition, advances in the analysis of mixtures and the multiplexing of multiple samples on a single sequencing run were critical to developing cost-efficient and effective analysis protocols.How large is the LifeScanner Lab-In-A-Box? Are there conditions (e.g. no internet access) where it cannot be used? All the equipment in the lab fits into a small airplane carry-on case. Internet access is beneficial in some cases, but it is designed to operate without internet access. This is achieved by including a mini-server in the kit with software required to do DNA-based species identification as well as the necessary reference library for some applications (e.g. wildlife crime detection).How quickly can the Lab-In-A-Box identify a sample to species level? How about to genus level (if no sequence matches to species level)?The Lab-In-A-Box can identify multiple samples concurrently. In fact, it is intended to be used in this manner. It can be used to analyze a batch of samples in six to 10 hours, depending on the application. For example, if a product being tested is extremely processed, more time would be required to extract and read the DNA. An identification is made to genus level if no species-level match is found.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wildlife forensics lab analyzes investigative evidence of wildlife crime. DNA analysis is uniquely able to help distinguish among similar confiscated wildlife products. Photo credit: US Fish and Wildlife ServiceWhat current and planned Lab-In-A-Box features will best support port authorities in detecting wildlife crime?Most of the current features are focused on sensitivity and cost. We want to ensure that we have a reasonably low false-negative [i.e. illegal substances aren’t misidentified as legal] and we want to drive down the price for analysis. With regard to future features, we will be focusing on making the solution easier to use.What’s on the horizon in applying wildlife barcoding technology?I believe that these advances in detection technologies, like Lab-In-A-Box, in combination with advanced data analysis, will help law enforcement better understand the supply channels used by criminals, a critical step in targeting the organized crime elements of wildlife crime.LifeScanner and Lab-In-A-Box aim to address the two challenges of rapid detection and successful prosecution, Ratnasingham said in a statement released by the iBOL conference. “It does this by reducing the cost of adopting DNA analysis infrastructure and by simplifying usage of DNA analysis tools.”Jaguars are categorized as “Near Threatened” under the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. Increasing demand for bones of jaguars, lions, and other big cats, as a substitute for the now-diminished supply of tiger bones for “traditional” Chinese medicine, means this status may decline in the future.  Photo credit: Sue Palminteri Crime, DNA, Genetics, handheld, Law Enforcement, Portable, Technology, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking, Wildtech center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Study reveals forests have yet another climate-protection superpower

first_imgScientists looked at reactive gases emitted by trees and other vegetation, finding they have an overall cooling effect on the atmosphere globally.As forests are cleared, emissions of these cooling reactive gases are reduced. The researchers estimate the loss of this function this may contribute 14 percent towards deforestation-caused global warming.The authors write that effective climate policies will require a “robust understanding” of the relationship between land-use change like deforestation and climate, and urge more research be done toward this goal. As big carbon storehouses, forests have the power to influence the climate. So much so that the protection and expansion of forests is a key part of the Paris Agreement, which seeks to lower greenhouse gas emissions and stave off the worst effects of global warming.A new study, published last week in Nature Communications, finds forests may have an even bigger cooling effect on climate than we thought. And that without them, the world may be heating up more quickly than expected.Living vegetation emits gases that can react and combine with other gases in the atmosphere. Some of these, called biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), affect the formation of other compounds like aerosol, ozone and methane, the presence of which can influence atmospheric temperature.For their study, an international team of researchers led by the University of Leeds in the UK looked at these reactive compounds to see what kind of a temperature changes they induce. To do this, they simulated boreal, temperate and tropical forest conditions and calculated different warming and cooling effects through computer modeling.They discovered that while trees emit gases that can warm the atmosphere (e.g., they can increase the formation of ozone and methane), gases that had a cooling effect had a greater overall impact.“We found that the cooling impacts of these gases outweigh the warming impacts, meaning that reactive gases given out by forests have an overall cooling effect on our climate,” said study coauthor Dominick Spracklen, a professor at the University of Leeds.A kapok tree bursts into bloom in the Amazon rainforest. The study found warming and cooling effects related to the emissions of reactive gases is most closely balanced in tropical forests compared to temperate and boreal forests.As forests are cleared, emissions of these cooling reactive gases are reduced. The researchers estimate the loss of this function this may contribute 14 percent towards deforestation-caused global warming.According to the researchers, this study is the first thorough analysis of the climatic impact of non-CO2 reactive gases emitted by forests and how it’s affected by human-caused land-use change.“Most previous assessments on the climate impacts of deforestation have focused on the amount of carbon dioxide that would be emitted, or changes to the way the land-surface exchanges energy and water with the atmosphere,” said lead author Catherine Scott of the University of Leeds. “But as well as taking in carbon dioxide and giving out oxygen, trees emit other gases that take part in complicated chemical reactions in the atmosphere and there are implications for reducing these gases.”The scientists write that effective climate policies will require a “robust understanding” of the relationship between land-use change like deforestation and climate, and urge more research be done toward this goal.“By understanding these complex effects we now know more about how forests are affecting our climate, and we are able to see a clearer picture of the repercussions of deforestation,” Scott said. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored boreal forests, carbon, Carbon Sequestration, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Politics, Environment, Gas, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Rainforests, Research, Temperate Forests, Trees, Tropical Forests Citation:Scott, C. E., Monks, S. A., Spracklen, D. V., Arnold, S. R., Forster, P. M., Rap, A., … & Ehn, M. (2018). Impact on short-lived climate forcers increases projected warming due to deforestation. Nature Communications, 9(1), 157.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Easter Island votes for world’s newest marine reserve

first_imgThe Rapa Nui Marine Protected Area encompasses 740,000 square kilometers (286,000 square miles) of Pacific Ocean surrounding Easter Island, or Rapa Nui. The reserve was approved by a 73 percent majority in a September 2017 referendum of islanders.The MPA is intended to eliminate the pressures of commercial fishing and mining on the unique and isolated ecosystem of Rapa Nui. Supporters of the project cite public support and participation as an encouraging sign of the reserve’s long-term potential.The Rapa Nui people and government of Chile are currently planning how the reserve will be enforced and monitored, prior to the official signing ceremony on February 27. Many in and outside Rapa Nui believe the reserve will aid relations between the island and the mainland, although there is lingering distrust among some islanders toward Chile. Stone heads loom in the imagination of most people when they think of Easter Island. Known as Rapa Nui to its inhabitants, who also go by the name Rapa Nui as a people, the island sits in a remote corner of the Pacific Ocean, 4,000 kilometers (2,500 miles) west of Chile. Like the mysterious stone Moai that line the landscape, there is more to this place than is visible from the surface.Easter Island’s world-renowned Moai statues were designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1995. Photo: Eduardo Sorenson/The Pew Charitable Trusts.Some 142 marine species found nowhere else on Earth (27 of which are at risk of extinction) and 77 percent of the Pacific’s fish abundance thrive in the waters around Rapa Nui. An expedition in early 2017 uncovered even more species, some new to science, in the depths surrounding the island, many of which were striking shades of red and orange.In the depths of the ocean, as the sunlight fades, red wavelengths of light are absorbed first, rendering many of the new discoveries, such as the sunset-colored Anatolanthias fish and the ochre-hued sea biscuit (a burrowing, urchin-like creature) virtually invisible in the twilit water.Nearer the surface, coral reef fish like Pseudolabrus semifasciatus, a wrasse species splashed in purple, yellow and monochrome tiger stripes, are a vivid reminder of the region’s unique biodiversity. Almost one-quarter of all fish swimming off the island reside permanently near the surface.In a bid to preserve these species, a new marine reserve covering 740,000 square kilometers (about 286,000 square miles) of ocean, an area greater than the size of France, has been officially designated by the Chilean government. The Rapa Nui Marine Protected Area will be off-limits to commercial mining and fishing, while the local people will be free to continue the traditional fishing methods of their ancestors.The announcement of the marine protected area (MPA) in 2017 was met with praise from environmental advocacy groups such as the Pew Charitable Trusts, which helped assess the economic consequences of a Rapa Nui reserve. Matt Rand, director of the Pew Bertarelli Ocean Legacy Project, hailed the decision as a democratic triumph: a referendum in September 2017 found 73 percent of locals in favor of the reserve following the highest instance of voter turnout in the island’s history. With local and international support rallying behind the project, hopes are high for a conservation success story.“There is a Polynesian concept called ‘Rahui,’ which is to make an area off-limits from exploitation. Community leaders proposed this ancient concept and led the way in building strong support in the referendum that supported the creation of an MPA,” Rand told Mongabay. “It was a historic moment for this island, but it should be a signal to other island and coastal communities that they can conserve their ocean environments and their own cultural heritage with marine protected areas.”Since the referendum, the Chilean government and the Rapa Nui people have worked together to finalize how the reserve will be overseen and its protections enforced once signed into law. Islanders have begun training as monitors, while Chile, which administers the island as a special territory, plans to assist with satellite observation of the MPA to ensure foreign vessels abide by its rules.The autonomous waters of Rapa Nui which will be protected from foreign extraction through the new marine reserve. Photo: The Pew Charitable Trusts.In recent years, the Rapa Nui have watched the distant lights of fishing boats on the horizon at night grow larger and more numerous. Meanwhile, the size and number of fish they catch with rock weights and lines has shrunk. Local landings of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), known as kahi ave ave in Rapa Nui, peaked around 2000 at 70 metric tons per year, but the following decade saw catches stagnate. In recent years, confidence in the ocean’s capacity to provide has diminished among the Rapa Nui — with encroaching foreign fleets and fishing regulations remote from the local culture getting the blame.Rand believes the experience has fueled support on the island for autonomy over the region’s resources, creating common cause for a reserve with the outgoing administration of Chilean President Michelle Bachelet, who is keen to shore up her record on environmental protection.“The government of Chile believes that public participation leads to better policy with a deeper connection to those who are affected, and we were committed to consultation with the Rapa Nui,” Marcelo Mena, Chile’s minister of the environment, said in a statement after news of the referendum result broke.“This marine protected area adds to the legacy of President Bachelet and the 1.5 million square kilometers [579,000 square miles] of protected areas created by this government.”Ludovic Burns Tuki, director of the Roundtable of the Sea, a coalition of more than 20 Rapa Nui groups, agrees that the participation of locals is crucial to the reserve’s long-term viability.“I think the government of Chile made a big step in understanding the worldview of Rapa Nui and our connection with the ocean,” Tuki told Mongabay. “For any MPA, it is important to work together, and what happens in Easter Island is an example for the entire world.”Like many islanders, however, Tuki is mindful of the missteps taken by Chile in relation to Easter Island in the past. In 2010, a no-take marine park was declared around the nearby island of Motu Motiro Hiva (known in Spanish as Salas y Gómez) without any consultation with the Rapa Nui themselves.“Because in Chilean law, Rapa Nui and Motu Motiro Hiva are two different islands,” Tuki explained. “For us, there was always a connection between the two islands.”Despite prior disagreement, the referendum result has encouraged many who foresee a more progressive and prosperous relationship with the mainland. Tuki is among them, highlighting the importance of cooperation and the potential for the Rapa Nui to sustainably manage their own waters.“We must work with strategy and union to get success for our community. It is important to know that 62 percent of the Rapa Nui have a Chilean surname, that is why we must keep good relations with respect and heart,” he said. “Today Rapa Nui is in a very good moment because of tourism and help from Chile.”For others, the influence of Chile is rooted in centuries of misrule, which sustains modern distrust of Santiago’s authority. As the Chilean presidential election thundered on in the distance, one local politician ran on a parliamentary ticket of self-determination for the Rapa Nui. Though her campaign fell short in December’s vote, the movement behind Annette Rapu Zamora suggests there are underlying problems that will not be swept away by the referendum.Outside of the political environment, scientists have applauded the reserve and what it could achieve for the region’s ecology. Donald Olson, a coral ecologist at the University of Miami, studied the reefs of Rapa Nui in 2007 and found an oasis of unique and unusual species.“[Rapa Nui] is the southeastern-most point for coral ecosystems in the Pacific, with no great connection to the West and elsewhere,” Olson told Mongabay.Ocean currents have restricted the dispersal of creatures to the island’s waters, acting as a natural boundary that Charles Darwin termed “the Great Eastern Pacific Barrier.” The result for Rapa Nui is a marine haven of “distinct, separate [life] forms” which evolved in isolation and occur nowhere else.Easter Island is home to at least 142 species found nowhere else, including the Easter Island butterflyfish (Chaetodon litus) pictured right. Photo: Eduardo Sorenson/The Pew Charitable Trusts.Olson believes the exclusion of foreign fishing and mining interests will promote healing in both the natural environment and social milieu of Rapa Nui, by ensuring “local people and the greater ecosystem are big winners.”He added: “The biggest thing the protected area will do is keep commercial fishing out and protect local interests, so that people can derive income from livelihoods that won’t harm the ocean.” Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Interns, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Protected Areas, Research Banner image: Rapa Nui fishers rely on traditional fishing methods perfected through centuries of practice, using rock weights and lines in the small boats pictured above. Photo: Eduardo Sorenson/The Pew Charitable Trusts. Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored CITATIONS:Aburto, J. A., Gaymer, C. F., Haoa, S., & González, L. (2015). Management of marine resources through a local governance perspective: Re-implementation of traditions for marine resource recovery on Easter Island. Ocean & Coastal Management, 116, 108-115.Glynn, P. W., Wellington, G. M., Riegl, B., Olson, D. B., Borneman, E., & Wieters, E. A. (2007). Diversity and biogeography of the scleractinian coral fauna of Easter Island (Rapa Nui). Pacific Science, 61(1), 67-90.Zylich, K., Harper, S., Lidandeo, R., Vega, R., Zeller, D., & Pauly, D. (2014). Fishing in Easter Island, a recent history (1950-2010). Latin American Journal of Aquatic Research, 42(4).last_img read more

WI wary of complacency

first_imgGEORGETOWN, Guyana (CMC):Opener Kieran Powell said yesterday the West Indies were cognisant of the danger of becoming overwhelmed by their historic win in the opening One-Day International against Pakistan, as they targetted a series-clinching victory in today’s second contest.The Caribbean side pulled off a thrilling four-wicket victory in Friday’s first game at the Guyana National Stadium and are aware another positive result will hand them their first series win over a higher-ranked side in five years.Powell told media here even though they had celebrated the outstanding effort, they were also wary of allowing complacency to step in.”That’s one of the things we addressed in team meeting [after the first game]. We have a win, we savour it, we celebrate it, but we don’t want to get complacent and think we have a win and end up losing the series 2-1,” the 27-year-old said.”So we have to come tomorrow and play as if the series is nil-nil and try and get a win, and potentially get the lead, which would be an unassailable lead in the series.”Having never successfully chased a total of over 300 in a one-dayer, West Indies made history when they overhauled a target of 309 to take a 1-0 lead in the three-match series.They were propelled by Jason Mohammed’s scintillating unbeaten 91 off 58 deliveries and left-hander Powell’s steady 61 from 86 balls.DEPARTED CHEAPLYBatting at number three, Powell helped rebuild the innings after Chadwick Walton departed cheaply in the fifth over with just 23 runs on the board adding 68 for the second wicket with Evin Lewis (47) and a further 65 for the third wicket with Shai Hope (24).Playing only his fourth game since returning to international cricket following a self-imposed two-year break, Powell said at no stage did he or the team panic during the run chase.”Personally, I was pretty calm. We had a plan in mind when I was batting and we just needed to get to around the 200-run mark by the time 40 overs were gone,” he explained.”Even though I started slowly, I knew I could always make up in the end. Obviously, I would have loved to have batted a bit deeper, but Jason Mohammed played a fantastic innings there at the back end and so did Ashley Nurse, to get us over the line.last_img read more

GALLERY: Gilas Pilipinas defends home court vs Japan

first_imgLATEST STORIES Sea turtle trapped in net freed in Legazpi City MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew UK plans Brexit celebrations but warns businesses may suffer GALLERY: Barangay Ginebra back as PBA Governors’ Cup kings Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netADVERTISEMENTcenter_img It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Nueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbed Nietes wants either Gonzalez or Sor Rungvisai next Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

Implications for the Financial Economy after March 21

first_imgDear Editor,The non-acceptance of the No-confidence Motion (NCM), particularly after March 21, 2019, can cultivate economic sanctions for Guyana along with elevated risk levels of compliance, sovereign risk ratings and further de-risking. Hence, the first level of impact will be on the banking sector which is the core segment of the financial system.The banking sector can articulate a country’s economic progress as banks play an important role in the mobilisation and allocation of financial resources within an economy. Further, given the current outlook for Guyana given the Government’s myopic vision, global risk management teams attached to our local banking sector corresponding relationships will critically place more emphasis on enhance due diligence to rating scenarios correlated to “country risk rating”.Additionally, this key rating consists of an examination of political factors and socio economic conditions that prevails within the country, inclusive of adherence to the constitutional laws of the country.It therefore means that factoring this potential high risk at hand, corresponding banks can place a “freeze or stop “strategy on commercial banks in Guyana as they seek to mitigate their exposure. We must understand that these corresponding banks have a certain degree of limit tolerance for economies like Guyana where we have not made sustainable improvements on the corruption index, revamping of our legislation geared towards safer financial operational mode required in modern day business activities and most importantly, weak political governance.Worse case, if a stop approach is determined then the implications will be significant as beyond what was experienced by some our local commercial banks in December 2016. This scenario can penetrate a “systematic risk” as banks and other financial money agents within Guyana would not be able to send or receive foreign currencies. As financial cross-border transactions ceases; our financial system, industries and our people will feel the negative impact such as rising foreign exchange rates, deterioration of banks assets base, food and fuel shortages, limited assistance from donor agencies, pharmaceutical shortages and nonpayment for tuition fees to foreign universities, etc.The fact is that this will be “hard times” as our people will say. More so, the international community and global regulators will look at us without any regard and empathy. Do we want this for ourselves, our country and an after effect which will require significant resources to turnaround? Can we afford this set back to our economy given that we have a seismic emerging oil industry too at hand?It is time! Yes, a time to act responsibly and respectfully by abiding with the Constitution coupled with taking a step back to fully understand the long-term detrimental effects this current action will have on international financial relationships, our economic activities and our people at most. To further highlight, compliance and international regulators has no infinite boundaries or alliances, thus no government of the day in any country in a modern financial world is their boss.Yours sincerely,Concerned bankerlast_img read more

Destination: Sinoe County

first_imgIt’s a known fact that by now all roads lead to the 177 year-old City of Greenville, Sinoe County, in southeastern Liberia – the official host for Liberia’s 168th Independence Day Celebration.Amongst the 15 counties, Sinoe is one of the four counties which aren’t landlocked (entirely enclosed by land).Therefore, there are three ways, in which one can come to Sinoe – by road, air and sea.Air travel is facilitated by UNMIL’s helicopter or commercial flight from the James Spring Payne Airfield.Private and rented boats from any water-point or port in the country, with an excellent navigator, can carry you to Sinoe.The most popular way of transport – road – the shortest way from Monrovia to Sinoe is through Buchanan, Grand Bassa County.If the roads are good, one can drive for about six hours to reach Greenville.Potholes mar the unpaved road from Buchanan thru Rivercess County to Nimba County. Drivers should be mindful prior to reaching the Rivercess-Nimba County junction. The right turn is the sure one. But some drivers make the mistake of taking the straight road.The Rivercess-Nimba County junction to Greenville is relatively smooth, except for some narrow hills and bridges.In Sinoe County, between Butaw and Jarploh towns are the muddy areas. But thanks to the tremendous ongoing road works by the AFL’s engineer battalion and the Public Works Ministry, good drivers can find the route accessible.At this time of the year, Greenville is cold. Travelers should come with sweaters and anything warm to feel comfortable in the climate.There is a surplus of food and water. Food – a variety of Liberian dishes, including Palm Butter, Cassava Leaf and Potato Greens – is served L$250 and water is sold at L$5 and L$150 respectively.Alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages are sold between L$100 to L$200. Wine or whiskey is between US$20 to US$50.In 1938, Greenville was founded by Mississippi Colonization Society (MCS), part of what was then the Mississippi-in-Africa Colony. Greenville was named after judge James Green, one of the Mississippi Delta planters to send a group of former slaves to Liberia.In 1842, the Mississippi settlement joined the commonwealth – Liberia.The Mississippi agents are highly known for Christianity, and most were Baptists and Methodists. Because of the rich land, the main exports were lumber, rubber and agriculture. That is why Sinoe’s flag has a green cross in the middle of a white field.The agents believed in purity and Sinoe was relatively peaceful.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Fire destroys Albion Estate guesthouse

first_imgAn early morning fire of unknown origin on Wednesday destroyed the Guest House at the Albion Sugar Estate manager’s quarters. The Estate’s firefighters had to seek back-up from the Guyana Fire Service to extinguish the blaze.Heavy smoke was spotted in the upper flat of the Guest House sometime aroundFire of unknown origin on Wednesday destroyed the Guest House at the Albion Sugar Estate in Berbice. The Estate’s firefighters had to seek back-up from the Guyana Fire Service to extinguish the blaze04:25h by a Security Constable at the Albion Estate, Alvin Inderdat, who was patrolling the compound at the time. However, he thought it was smoke from the Estate’s chimney.“So after I look back again I realised it was suspicious so I leave where I was and rush to the Guest House and then I saw the smoke coming from the second flat of the building and I rush to the security hut and make contact with the Corporal on duty who make contact with the factory tender and with Rose Hall and New Amsterdam.”Firefighters from the Albion Estate were able to access water from a nearby canal. Ten minutes after the initial smoke was seen, flames were bursting through windows but with the assistance of other workers at the estate, firefighters managed to contain the blaze.Meanwhile, one unit from the Rose Hall Fire Service and another from the New Amsterdam Fire Service responded.“The entire front part of the building was on fire,” Inderdat recalled. He said firefighters from the Albion Estate concentrated on containing the blaze until additional help came from New Amsterdam and Rose Hall.The building housed the senior managers club, a kitchen and a guest house.It is believed the fire started in the vicinity of the bar which is on the second floor.The firefighters were able to put out the fire without much damage being done to the outside of the building where the guest rooms were located.The Guest House at Albion is usually rented for social events including weddings and meetings. The Guyana Fire Service is investigating the circumstances surrounding the fire. (Andrew Carmichael)last_img read more