Indigenous Guarani leader appeals to Europe to save people and forests

first_imgBrazil’s Temer administration is seriously violating the rights of the Guarani-Kaiowá people according to their leader, Ladio Veron, who is touring Europe this Spring to garner support for the rights of indigenous people in Brazil.Veron, in presentations and petitions across Europe, has highlighted the rising violence against indigenous people in Brazil, publicized past and on-going land thefts, and protested the efforts of the Temer government to halt the demarcation of indigenous lands guaranteed under the nation’s 1988 Constitution.The tour is being conducted against a background of escalating civil unrest and public protest in Brazil, as the Temer government staggers under the weight of corruption charges. His administration’s approval rating is in the single digits and near collapse, though the current National Congress has also been antagonistic to indigenous rights. European allies joined Guarani leader Ladio Veron at a London demonstration protesting against the anti-indigenous policies of Brazilian President Michel Temer. Photo © Eleanor K. Russell courtesy of Survival InternationalLadio Veron, leader of Brazil’s indigenous Guarani-Kaiowá people, is touring Europe and making a desperate international appeal to halt attacks and killings, land theft and environmental destruction that his people say have become a hallmark of Brazil’s Temer administration.The Guarani-Kaiowá is fighting for recognition of their indigenous land rights in the state of Mato Grosso do Su in southwest Brazil, bordering Paraguay. After decades of violent territorial disputes with cattle ranchers, soy and sugar cane farmers, Veron hopes to galvanize support and build an international network of allies that will put pressure on Temer and the agribusiness lobby-dominated National Congress back home.Europe “cannot solve this,” Veron told Mongabay, but it “can support us, add pressure, condemn the situation and demand that our rights and land are recognized.”The leader’s three-month tour, starting in March and ending in July, coincides with rising tensions between the state and indigenous people across Brazil which have erupted into protests, followed in some cases by violent attacks. Now in Spain, the tour includes visits to Greece, Italy, the UK, Portugal, Ireland, Germany, Switzerland, France, Belgium and Austria.“I’m here to fight for justice for my people,” Veron said as he led a peaceful protest outside the Brazilian embassy in London this April. As he accepted encouragement and hugs from demonstrators, he acknowledged, “I’ve come such a long way.”Guarani leader Ladio Veron. Photo © Eleanor K. Russell courtesy of Survival InternationalThe Brazilian Embassy confirmed receipt of a petition from Veron on behalf of the Guarani-Kaiowá containing a “request for land demarcation and safety” and it described the protest as a “peaceful and democratic meeting.”The petition demands the Temer government “map out Guarani land immediately.”Before European settlers arrived in South America, there were as many as a few million Guarani people. Today there are around 51,000 living in Brazil — about a third of which are Guarani-Kiaowa. In the early 1900s, the state’s Indian Protection Service (SPI) reduced Guarani-Kiaowa land to eight reservation areas, totalling just under 30,000 hectares (115 square miles). Now the same lands are home to “new towns and factories,” says Veron.According to the Brazilian Embassy, today about “13 percent of Brazil is demarcated indigenous areas, or approximately 1,173,000 square kilometers (453,000 square miles) — more than four times the size of the United Kingdom.”The full demarcation of indigenous lands was guaranteed under Brazil’s 1988 constitution, but the government has long delayed completing the project. “The land is still not given, we do not know why,” says Veron.The Guarani-Kaiowá now live on small roadside patches, each no bigger than a football pitch. Veron says there have been 46 successful land reclaiming attempts. Each attempt regains a farm or patch, a couple of square miles in size.Protestors call for indigenous rights in Brazil. Photo © Eleanor K. Russell courtesy of Survival InternationalWhile previous governments have made empty promises to recognize and return Guarani-Kaiowá land, delaying the demarcation process, the current government is hurriedly moving to approve plans to halt the demarcation process altogether.Farmers, would-be land owners and land thieves have reacted to the indigenous land reclamations, government inaction and anti-indigenous rhetoric, by sometimes hiring gunmen. As a result, according to a 2015 report by the Brazilian NGO Conselho Indigenista Missionario (Indigenous Missionary Council or Cimi), 390 Guarani-Kaiowá leaders were killed between 2003 and 2014. More were attacked and seriously injured.In hopes of ending this violence, the petition Veron delivered to the Brazilian embassy in London has now been “transmitted to our Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Brasilia and to the president of Fundação Nacional do Índio, the National Indian Foundation [FUNAI],” an embassy spokesperson said. FUNAI is Brazil’s state body responsible for policies protecting indigenous people.In May, a federal Parliamentary Commission recommended the abolition of FUNAI and called for the arrest of some of its employees for allegedly illegal activities in support of the indigenous movement. During the tour, European signatures are being collected for petitions opposing the recent, crippling funding cuts to FUNAI.While FUNAI’s budget has been “dangerously low for many years,” says Sarah Shenker, senior campaigner at NGO, Survival International, the most recent spate of cuts is “not an accident. Powerful politicians are attempting to reduce its power and impact.” Critics say the newest cuts come as the bancada ruralista, Brazil’s agribusiness lobby, seeks to be rewarded for their support of President Temer in his rise to power last year.“It’s an emergency that could spell extinction for uncontacted tribes,” adds Shenker.Brazilian tribal leader Ladio Veron hands a letter demanding land rights to a Brazilian embassy official in London. Photo © Eleanor K. Russell courtesy of Survival InternationalThe tour is also gaining European signatures on a petition urging a no vote by the Brazilian Congress on ‘PEC 215’. This constitutional amendment would remove powers from FUNAI to restore indigenous lands, transferring that power to Congress, whose members are heavily influenced by agribusiness interests.While long term impacts of the tour are unknown, short term, the Guarani-Kaiowá people’s “voice has been made clear,” says Shenker.The Guarani-Kaiowá tour has prompted favorable media reports in Brazil, Spain, Italy, the UK and Germany. “There have been a lot of publications in many languages; there has been a good response from the media,” says Shenker. And many European organizations have offered assistance, including faith groups in Italy and environmental activists in Greece.Spanish, German and Austrian members of parliament all met with Veron. The UK’s All-Party Parliamentary Group on Human Rights has committed to monitoring human rights abuses against the Guarani-Kaiowá, as has the Irish political movement, Sinn Fein. Requests that the issue be raised in the German and European Parliaments are also in motion.“International pressure can make a difference,” says Shenker.Veron has visited the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, spoken with activists in Leipzig, East Germany and been on numerous radio shows. In Austria, he spoke at a school about how European food consumption habits are directly linked to the politics of the agricultural lobbies in Brazil — soy grown on former indigenous lands feeds people worldwide.It helps when people in Europe “realize that what is happening to indigenous people is not just a situation that is far away, and not to do with us,” says Shenker.The tour is a direct response to the Guarani-Kaiowá losing faith in the current government. “What Temer proposes is nothing short of genocide and ethnocide for indigenous peoples,” says Seb Muniz, senior international programmes officer at War on Want Latin America.Temer is not “ the first one to violate our rights and discriminate against us,” Veron told Mongabay. For years, state promises to protect indigenous people and restore lands have not been fulfilled. There is “no reply” and “no results,” says Veron, “no answers, no follow ups.”“So many times, [our] leaders go to the capital to speak with the government, but they are not listened to,” says Veron. “We ask for parliament, for congress, the senate, for an audience, but they will not receive us.” In May, the largest indigenous protest ever in Brasilia, the country’s capital, was met with teargas and rubber bullets.“The last solution is to come to Europe and to ask for support,” says Veron. “We don’t have anyone to turn to in Brazil.”As the tour unfolds, Brazilians are falling deeper into despair, as corruption rocks the country. “Repression, militarization and an ever-growing disregard for democracy leaves the most vulnerable in Brazil in a particularly challenging situation,” says Muniz.Temer’s austerity reforms, privatization attempts, cuts in social programs, environmental assaults and concentration of political power represent an attack “not only on indigenous people but on all popular and vulnerable sectors of Brazilian society,” Muniz concludes.“The movement is strengthening,” Shenker says, but with the fate of the Guarani-Kaiowá people and Brazil’s remaining rainforests very much in doubt, “it’s more important than ever that people everywhere stand up.”The European response to the Guarani cause has been strong, and has included enthusiastic public support, government and NGO meetings as well as media coverage. Meanwhile in Brazil, the Temer administration is besieged by corruption charges and civil unrest. Photo © Eleanor K. Russell courtesy of Survival International Agriculture, Controversial, Corruption, Culture, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Forests, Green, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Social Justice, Soy Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Move to open U.S. Atlantic coast to oil drilling meets increased opposition

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Mammals, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Mammals, Noise Pollution, Oceans, Offshore Drilling, Oil, Oil Drilling, Whales, Wildlife In April, Trump issued an executive order aimed at implementing his so-called “America-First Offshore Energy Strategy,” which called for a review of the 2017-2022 Five Year Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program finalized under the Obama Administration and proposed that all U.S. waters be considered for offshore drilling.The executive order also instructed federal agencies to “streamline” the permitting process for “seismic research and data collection” and “expedite all stages of consideration” of Incidental Harassment Authorizations required under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act.A species of particular concern is the North Atlantic right whale, which is listed as critically endangered under the US Endangered Species Act. There are only about 500 of the whales left, and their only known calving ground is off the coast of the southeast US, including the area where seismic surveying has been proposed. The Trump Administration has taken steps to open up the United States’ Atlantic waters to offshore oil exploration and drilling, sparking fierce resistance up and down the coast.For instance, Timothy O’Brien, a self-described “angler and sportsman” who is president of Tycoon Tackle, Inc. and serves on the Ecosystem and Ocean Planning Advisory Panel of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, wrote in an op-ed in June that “My business and my customers’ businesses will be hit hard if the exploration and drilling for oil off the Atlantic Coast goes forward. But it is not just angling that is at risk, the entire coastal economy and way of life is under threat.”O’Brien’s most immediate concern is that, before any drilling can begin, surveys of the Atlantic coastal region would first be performed by seismic airgun blasting. Continually blasting intense bursts of noise into the water every 10 to 12 seconds in order to determine what resources might lie beneath the ocean floor, seismic airguns are so loud they can be heard underwater as far as 2,500 miles away — and the blasting can go on for weeks or even months straight.“Studies have shown that this type of disturbance can decrease catch rates of commercial fish species by an average of 50 percent over thousands of square miles,” O’Brien notes. “Further, these blasts are known to harm marine mammals and other species that are vital to a healthy ecosystem.”O’Brien is far from alone in his opposition to the Trump Administration’s plans to open the Atlantic coast to exploitation by oil and gas companies. According to the NGO Oceana, “an alliance representing over 41,000 businesses and 500,000 fishing families from Florida to Maine, also oppose oil exploration and/or development in the Atlantic,” while the fishery management councils for the Mid-Atlantic, New England, and the South Atlantic regions have all expressed concerns about the risks posed by seismic airgun blasting.Joining them are 131 East Coast municipalities and well over 1,000 elected officials at the federal, local, and state levels, including over 100 members of the US Congress and the governors of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.Graphic by Oceana.This is a fight that began long before Trump took office. The Atlantic coast has been off-limits to drilling for the past three decades, but Trump is not the first president whose administration considered opening the United States’ Atlantic waters up to oil and gas development.In the early 1980s, the US Congress enacted a prohibition on offshore drilling that effectively banned the practice in the eastern Gulf of Mexico and off the Atlantic and Pacific coastlines. A presidential moratorium was later put in place by George H.W. Bush in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez spill. His son, George W. Bush, reversed the presidential ban on offshore drilling in 2008, however, at a time when “Drill, Baby, Drill” had become a popular presidential campaign slogan amongst Republicans. Congress would eventually follow Bush’s lead and allow its ban to expire, as well.The presidential moratorium was not reinstated under the Obama Administration, which appeared to be generally supportive of Atlantic oil exploration, even going so far as to propose opening portions of the Atlantic coast to offshore drilling in 2014, including the coasts of North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Virginia. That proposal was eventually shelved, however, and the Atlantic removed from consideration for offshore drilling following opposition from local communities and elected officials.Permits for seismic surveys were considered by the Obama Administration, but in January 2017, before the Trump Administration came to power, all pending permits were rejected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). But then, in April, Trump issued an executive order aimed at implementing his so-called “America-First Offshore Energy Strategy,” which called for a review of the 2017-2022 Five Year Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program finalized under the Obama Administration and proposed that all U.S. waters be considered for offshore drilling.The executive order also instructed federal agencies to “streamline” the permitting process for “seismic research and data collection” and “expedite all stages of consideration of Incidental Take Authorization requests, including Incidental Harassment Authorizations and Letters of Authorization, and Seismic Survey permit applications” required under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. The executive order prompted Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to issue a secretarial order that instructed BOEM to reverse its previous decision to deny permits for seismic surveying activities off the East Coast.Before those permits can be officially released, however, companies that hope to put ships in the water towing the seismic airgun arrays used for surveying what’s beneath the ocean floor must secure an Incidental Harassment Authorization, or IHA, from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), as any party that wants to do something that could potentially harm or injure marine mammals is required to do under the Marine Mammal Protection Act.Map by Oceana.Oceana was one of several groups that submitted comments to NMFS in opposition to the five IHAs that have been granted to companies seeking to do seismic surveys off the Atlantic coastline. “As soon as NMFS is done reviewing those comments, they can release those IHAs,” Ingrid Biedron, a marine scientist and campaign manager with Oceana, told Mongabay. As for how long the review process could take, and hence how soon companies could conceivably begin seismic airgun blasting in the Atlantic, Biedron said: “It could be tomorrow, it could be this fall, we really don’t know how long it’s going to take them and how much care they’re going to put into reviewing those comments. We hope they put a lot of attention into them and take our suggestions into account. But we don’t know.”Mongabay’s requests for comment were not returned by BOEM or Secretary Zinke’s office.Seismic surveys could threaten critically endangered marine mammalSeismic airgun surveys are the first step toward offshore drilling, of course, but under the current five-year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas leasing program adopted by the Obama Administration, the Atlantic can not be considered for drilling. That’s why the Trump Administration wants to rewrite the five-year plan: to open not just the Atlantic but also the entire Gulf of Mexico, the Pacific, and the Arctic Ocean for drilling.“That’s a longer-term process,” Biedron noted. “We still care about it and want to pay attention, but that’s a much longer timeline, on the order of probably a couple years.”Whether or not oil wells are ever drilled off the Atlantic coast, Biedron says that the seismic airgun surveying process that would be used to determine where best to locate any potential wells would have severe consequences. “The problem with seismic airgun surveys being proposed in the Atlantic are that peer-reviewed, published science shows that they can negatively impact marine life, including endangered whales and sea turtles, as well as commercially important fish, shellfish, even zooplankton,” she said. “Research shows that the feeding activities, mating, navigational activities can all be impacted by seismic airgun noise.”BOEM itself has estimated that as many as 138,000 marine mammals could be injured by seismic airgun blasting off the Atlantic coast, while millions more animals’ lives would be disrupted.A species of particular concern is the North Atlantic right whale, which is listed as critically endangered under the US Endangered Species Act. There are only about 500 of the whales left, and their only known calving ground is off the coast of the southeast US, including the area where seismic surveying has been proposed. Conservationists worry that the impacts of seismic airgun blasting could be the final nail in the North Atlantic right whale’s coffin.That is not a risk conservationists see as worth taking, especially given how little oil and gas is actually at stake. A 2011 assessment by BOEM of the undiscovered oil and gas resources in the US Outer Continental Shelf found that the Atlantic contains less than four percent of the nation’s total oil reserves and less than three percent of its gas reserves.But it’s the wellbeing and livelihoods of their constituents that appears to have led Reps. John Rutherford (R-FL) and Don Beyer (D-VA) to send a bipartisan letter co-signed by more than 100 of their fellow members of Congress to Secretary Zinke stating their opposition to the Trump Administration’s moves toward opening up the Atlantic for oil and gas exploration.“This decision to move forward with permits for seismic airgun surveys for subsea oil and gas deposits puts at risk the vibrant Atlantic Coast economies dependent on healthy ocean ecosystems, which generate $95 billion in gross domestic product and support nearly 1.4 million jobs each year,” the members of Congress wrote. “Opening the Atlantic to seismic testing and drilling jeopardizes our coastal businesses, fishing communities, tourism, and our national security. It harms our coastal economies in the near term and opens the door to even greater risks from offshore oil and gas production down the road.”The critically endangered North Atlantic right whale is a species of utmost concern should seismic airgun blasting be allowed off the Atlantic coast. Photo Credit: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Rhino poacher sentenced to 18 years in prison

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Black Rhino, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rhinos, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking A court in Malawi has convicted and sentenced a rhino poacher to 18 years in prison for killing an adult female black rhinoceros.Two of his accomplices were also handed sentences of ten and eight years each.The recent 18-year sentence might serve as a deterrent to would-be poachers, some experts say. In July this year, poachers killed a female black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis), and hacked off her horns, in Liwonde National Park, Malawi.A Malawian court has now convicted and sentenced one of the poachers to 18 years in prison. Two of his accomplices were also handed sentences of ten and eight years each, according to African Parks, a conservation non-profit that manages Liwonde National Park in partnership with Malawi’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW).The three men were arrested following a rapid joint operation undertaken by the Malawi Police Services and DNPW. Once the rhino carcass was discovered, the teams tracked the location of the horns to a shop owned by one of the poachers. The response teams searched the shop, and discovered the set of horns in a deep freezer. They also recovered the rifle used in the incident and 25 rounds of ammunition.“Rarely in wildlife crime are the perpetrators brought to justice,” African Parks’ Craig Reid, Park Manager of Liwonde National Park, said in a statement. “The speed at which the poachers were located, arrested, tried and convicted is a testament to the Malawian government and its partners’ commitment to protecting their wildlife and taking a stand against criminal activity.”Rangers on patrol in Liwonde National Park in Malawi. Photo by Annegré Bosman / Pluk Media.The court charged the three men with entering into a protected area without authority, conveying a weapon into a protected area, killing a listed species, possession of a weapon, and possession of rhino horn (possession and dealing in government trophies, namely of listed species), according to African Parks.The recent 18-year sentence might serve as a deterrent to would-be poachers, Reid said.Brighton Kumchedwa, the Director of the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, added: “The successes of this case are reflective of our wider efforts and achievements in Malawi to crack down on wildlife crime. We now have a law enforcement and legal system that are serious about these offenses and protecting our country’s wildlife, and we’re proud that these have delivered swift justice”.Poaching continues to be a major threat to black rhinos. Photo by Harald Zimmer, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 3.0.The black rhinoceros, or the hook-lipped rhinoceros, once ranged widely in Africa, but was wiped out across most of its range. In fact, the species also went extinct in Malawi in the late 1980s. Black rhinos were then re-introduced into the country from other black rhino strongholds.Today, only about 5,000 black rhinos are estimated to survive in the wild, and the species is listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. The black rhino is also listed on the Appendix I of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species), which means that international trade in the species or its parts is prohibited.Only about 5,000 black rhinos survive in the wild today. Photo by Lucas Alexander, Wikimedia Commons, public domain. Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Top 10 HAPPY environmental stories of 2017

first_imgThroughout 2017, scientists discovered new populations of rare wildlife, and rediscovered some species that were previously thought to be extinct.Some countries created large marine protected areas, while a few others granted land rights to indigenous communities.In 2017, we also saw the ever-increasing potential of technology to improve conservation monitoring and efforts. The past year may have seemed like doom and gloom for the environment, but there was plenty to be thankful for. So once again, we bring you some of the happier environmental stories of 2017 (in no particular order). These include rediscoveries of species that were once thought to be extinct, local communities being granted land rights, and the emergence of new technologies that are boosting conservation efforts.1. New populations of rare wildlife were foundThis year, conservationists discovered some new populations of threatened wildlife. Take, for example, the helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil). A research team recorded a new and “unexpectedly rich population” of this critically endangered bird in western Borneo. For a species that is now nearly extinct because of poaching, this discovery boosts hope for its future.It was good news for the Grauer’s gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) as well. Surveys in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Maiko National Park revealed several previously uncounted individuals of Grauer’s gorillas in just 1 percent of the park. The researchers think that there might be many more gorillas living inside the largely unexplored 10,885-square-kilometer (4,000-square-mile) park.First-of-a-kind surveys of forests in Karen state in southeast Myanmar also yielded records of at least 31 species of mammals, including tigers, Asian elephants, Phayre’s langurs and dholes. The region was previously out-of-bounds for scientists due to security and political reasons. Similarly, surveys in Thailand’s Eastern Forest Complex revealed the world’s second known breeding population of Indochinese tigers (Panthera tigris corbetti), making Thailand home to two breeding populations of this tiger subspecies.Grauer’s gorilla. Photo by Joe McKenna via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0).2. Lost and found: Some species were spotted after decades2017 was also a year of rediscoveries. A guard at a recently created amphibian reserve in the Cuchumatanes Mountain range in Guatemala, for example, chanced upon the brilliantly colored Jackson’s climbing salamander (Bolitoglossa jacksoni) more than 40 years after it was first recorded. A naturalist in India spotted an extremely rare cobra lily that had not been seen for nearly 80 years.Scientists also reported the rediscovery of the Táchira antpitta (Grallaria chthonia), a plump brown bird that was first recorded during an expedition in the mid-1950s in a remote part of the Andes in Venezuela. In yet another expedition exploring the western Amazon, a field guide spotted the Vanzolini’s bald-faced saki (Pithecia vanzolinii), a large black monkey with a long fluffy tail and golden fur, leaping from one tree branch to another. This was the first living evidence of this monkey in 80 years, researchers say.Vanzolini saki monkey in flooded forest along the Eiru River. Photo by Christina Selby.3. Papua New Guinea got its largest-ever conservation areaLast month, Papua New Guinea officially declared the Managalas Conservation Area, a 3,600-square-kilometer (1,390-square-mile) protected area in the country’s southeast, which stretches from near the ocean up into the mountains. Conservation organizations and local communities had been working toward this protection for 32 years. The Managalas Conservation Area hopes to protect the Managalas plateau from large-scale logging and mining operations.The Managalas Conservation Area encompasses 3,600 square kilometers of Papua New Guinea. Data source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, accessed through Global Forest Watch.4. Local researchers are taking on leadership roles in conservationFor decades, Western scientists have dominated conservation research in Madagascar. They have helped create and manage many of Madagascar’s protected areas and have played an integral role in defining the country’s conservation priorities. Some foreign researchers say that this foreign dominance has “limited the ability of biodiversity research to generate debate and influence Malagasy society more broadly.” But a series of programs, over the past decade or so, have aimed at boosting early-career Madagascan scientists and are now helping local researchers take on more leadership roles in conservation.Fanomezana Ratsoavina, center, in her lab on campus with two students preparing to defend their master’s theses. Photo by Rowan Moore Gerety for Mongabay.5. A U.S. subnational delegation bypassed Trump and committed to keeping America’s Paris goalIn June this year, U.S. President Donald Trump announced that the country would be pulling out of the Paris Agreement on climate change. He also said that his administration would not be paying for a pavilion at the U.N.’s climate summit held at Bonn, Germany, this year, that countries typically set up to showcase their climate actions. The U.S. federal government has sponsored such a pavilion for 22 years.In defiance of Trump, a rival coalition of U.S. governors, mayors, business and religious leaders paid for, and opened, an unofficial pavilion dubbed “America’s Pledge: We Are Still In.” This delegation, representing non-federal actors in 15 U.S. states, 455 cities, 1,747 businesses and 325 universities, proclaimed its commitment to the Paris Agreement on behalf of the American people. Governor Jerry Brown of California and former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg led the delegation.“The federal government doesn’t decide whether or how the U.S. takes action on climate change,” Bloomberg said at a standing-room-only event on Nov. 11. “Those decisions are made by cities, states, businesses and civil society. The goal of the federal government is to support and coordinate those efforts. But if Washington won’t lead, mayors, governors and CEOs will. And there is nothing Washington can do to stop us.”The U.S. subnationals gather at COP23. Former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg (left) greets Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto in Bonn, Germany, November 11, 2017. Photo credit: Bloomberg Philanthropies6. Philanthropists and companies made big commitments for the environmentWith Trump turning his back on climate change issues, philanthropists and big companies stepped up to tackle the problem.The Gates Foundation, for example, announced a $300 million grant to support agriculture research that would help farmers in Africa and Asia adapt to climate change. The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation also announced a $600 million donation over five years, from 2018 to 2023, to nonprofits that are working on climate change solutions.Other foundations have pledged their support for conservation efforts. The U.S.-based Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, for example, has announced $20 million in grants to local and global nonprofit organizations that are working in the areas of conservation, human rights and the environment. The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has announced a five-year, $50 million grant to address the environmental degradation of the Andes-Amazon region by ongoing infrastructure projects like roads and dams. At the same time, the Switzerland-based Oak Foundation has committed $100 million to support ocean conservation activities, including the prevention of illegal fishing, support for small-scale fishery governance, protection of marine ecosystems and livelihoods, and a reduction in the plastic pollution in oceans.Coral, damselfish and anemones in Komodo, Indonesia. Photo: Rhett A. Butler.7. Indigenous land rights were granted to communitiesIndigenous and rural communities in Indonesia are slowly reclaiming their ancestral rights to their land. In December last year, the Indonesian government for the first time recognized the rights of nine indigenous communities to the forests they have traditionally called home. This year, it granted land rights to some more indigenous communities. So far, the administration has restored the rights to 164 square kilometers (63 square miles) of land to indigenous communities. However, critics say that this falls short of what the country’s president promised in his 2014 election campaign. Indonesia’s main indigenous alliance, AMAN, is campaigning to reclaim rights to more than 6,600 square kilometers (2,548 square miles) of customary lands in the country.In another rare victory for indigenous communities, Brazil’s Temer government, which has previously attacked indigenous rights, established the 12,000-square-kilometer (4,630-square-mile) Indigenous Territory of Turubaxi-Téa along the Middle Negro River in Amazonas state.Indigenous groups in Enrekang district, South Sulawesi province, submitted on Oct. 26 a proposal to the Indonesian government to obtain rights to their forests. Photo by Wahyu Chandra/Mongabay Indonesia.8. Large marine reserves were createdNiue, a small island country in the South Pacific with a population of just 1,600, established a new marine protected area that covers 40 percent of the island’s exclusive economic zone. Through the 127,000-square-kilometer (49,000-square-mile) marine reserve, the government of Niue hopes to protect its fish stocks and help reduce overfishing of threatened fish species.In September this year, Chile announced a 740,000-square-kilometer (285,700-square-mile) marine reserve around its remote Easter Island. The Rapa Nui Rahui Marine Protected Area region is home to over 140 marine species found nowhere else on Earth, and the park will not allow industrial fishing, mining and other extractive activities. In October, Chile announced the creation of two more marine reserves. At 117,000 square kilometers (45,170 square miles), one of the new reserves covers the ocean off Diego Ramírez Islands, off South America’s Cape Horn, while the second protected area, at 484,000 square kilometers (186,870 square miles), lies around the Juan Fernández Islands in the southern Pacific.Mexico has also announced the expansion of the Revillagigedo marine park to create the largest marine reserve of its kind in North America to protect sharks, rays, whales, turtles and other important marine species. At about 150,000 square kilometers (57,900 square miles), the park will surround four Revillagigedo Islands.The waters off Revillagigedo Islands are home to giant manta rays. Photo by Elias Levy via Flickr (CC BY 2.0).9. New technologies are boosting conservation effortsThis year we saw the ever-increasing potential of technology to improve conservation monitoring and efforts. The international Barcode of Life initiative, for example, has developed a new LifeScanner Lab-In-A-Box portable DNA barcoding kit that can be used by rangers, police and port-of-entry officials to rapidly identify the species of plant and animal samples found on suspected smugglers. Another team has developed a handheld portable DNA sequencing device that allows it to identify plants faster than before in the field. Researchers have also adapted widely used technologies, like thermal imaging video technology, to detect the impact of white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats.Advancements in technologies have boosted the involvement of non-scientists in conservation — from contributing to polar bear identification to counting trees and monitoring their leafing, flowering and fruiting cycles. Scientists are also developing better robots that could potentially help in monitoring wildlife.The LifeScanner Lab-In-A-Box, a portable DNA barcoding laboratory, is a new tool to help rangers, police, customs agents and other officials quickly determine whether wildlife samples are endangered, invasive or legally traded. Photo credit: Rob O’Flanagan, University of Guelph.10. See: The top 20 new species of 20172017 was an exciting year for species discoveries. Scientists reported a new species of orangutan, the first full species of great ape described since the Bonobo from the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1929. The newly described Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) lives in Sumatra, Indonesia, and may be the most endangered great ape on the planet.Expeditions across the world revealed many more species previously unknown to Western science. One team of scientists discovered 19 new species of geckos within limestone hill caves in Myanmar. Others uncovered 50 new spider species in Australia, several new species of frogs in India, and two primates: a new species of dwarf lemur in Madagascar, and a new species of bushbaby in the forests of Angola.You can see the photos of the top new species of 2017 here.The newly described Tapanuli orangutan (Pongo tapanuliensis) in Indonesia. Photo by Maxime Aliaga. Animals, Biodiversity, Climate, Climate Change, Conservation, Conservation Technology, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Technology, Trees, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Scientists discover 18 new spider-hunting spiders from Madagascar

first_imgResearchers have added 18 new species to the assassin spider family, upping the total number of known Eriauchenius and Madagascarchaea species to 26.Assassin spiders, also known as pelican spiders, have special physical and behavioral adaptations that allow them to hunt other spiders.The new species were discovered in Madagascar’s forests and through examination of previously collected museum specimens.Madagascar is currently experiencing high levels of deforestation. Researchers say the loss of Madagascar’s forests is putting the new assassin spiders – as well as many other species – at risk of extinction. With their long “necks” and sharp, fang-like mouthparts, assassin spiders hunt a strange prey – other spiders. Now, thanks to a study published recently in ZooKeys, there are 18 more known species in the world. Researchers think even more lie in wait in Madagascar’s unique, isolated forests, but are worried the country’s rampant deforestation will claim the spiders before they’re discovered.Assassin spiders, also called pelican spiders, are native to Madagascar, South Africa and Australia. They’re nocturnal, hunting other spiders under the cover of darkness by following the silk lines of their unsuspecting prey. Once an assassin spider is close, it dispatches its victim by stabbing it with its fangs; its protracted “neck” keeps the hunter at a safe distance in case the other spider puts up a fight.Known as “living fossils” because those that are alive today have scarcely changed from their forebears preserved in amber 50 million years ago, assassin spiders have been little studied since the first was discovered in Madagascar in the late 1800s.Pelican spiders are beautiful and iconic Madagascan spiders. They have a bizarre appearance, with a long “neck” and chelicerae (“jaws”) that are used to prey on other spiders from a distance. This pelican spider (pictured above, top) is dangling its spider prey (bottom) upside-down using its chelicerae after capturing it. These spiders also occur in Australia and South Africa; however, the species with the longest “necks” occur in Madagascar. All of the pelican spiders that Wood described live only in Madagascar, an island whose tremendous biodiversity is currently threatened by widespread deforestation. The new species add to scientists’ understanding of that biodiversity, and will help Wood investigate how pelican spiders’ unusual traits have evolved and diversified over time. They also highlight the case for conserving what remains of Madagascar’s forests and the biodiversity they contain, she says. Photo by Nikolaj ScharffHannah Wood, curator of arachnids (spider and scorpions) and myriapods (millipedes and their ilk) at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, set out to change this. She and her colleague Nikolaj Scharff focused on the Eriauchenius and Madagascarchaea genera, examining museum specimens as well as traveling to Madagascar to see what they could find in the island’s unique forests.Wood and Scharff studied hundreds of spiders, which they grouped into 26 different species. Of these 26 species, 18 had never before been described – a discovery that wasn’t entirely unexpected.“I wasn’t surprised,” Wood said. “We know very little about the total diversity of arachnids, and particularly in an area like Madagascar, I would say the majority of tiny arthropods are new species.” As field workers continue to collect more specimens in Madagascar, Woods believes more new assassin spiders are bound to come to light.But Woods cautions that these undiscovered arthropods are at risk. Madagascar is currently experiencing widespread deforestation, fuelled by logging, mining and agricultural expansion. Satellite data from the University of Maryland show tree cover loss in Madagascar more than doubled between 2012 and 2013, and has remained high ever since. In total, the island lost more than 27,000 square kilometers (10,700 square miles) – or 16 percent – of its tree cover between 2001 and 2016.Around 5 percent of Madagascar land area is officially protected. These places are less at risk of deforestation, but threats still persist. Protected areas cover most of Madagascar’s remaining intact forest landscapes – areas of native habitat that are undisturbed and connected enough to retain their original biodiversity levels. But these, too, are being whittled away, losing around 466 square kilometers (180 square miles) of old growth forest between 2001 and 2013.Satellite data show Madagascar’s intact forest landscapes (IFLs) experienced significant degradation during the past decade. Several of the new species described in Wood and Scharff’s study were found in the IFLs shown.In addition to these new assassin spiders, Madagascar’s forests are home to a unique array of plants and animals, many of which are found nowhere else in the world. From iconic lemurs to the world’s smallest chameleon, scientists and conservationists fear what will happen to Madagascar’s wildlife if its forests continue to be cleared at current rates.Woods adds her own concerns on behalf of assassin spiders, saying their vulnerability to habitat change is leaving her worried about the future of these new species.“For most of these species, if you lose the forests where they live, the species will go extinct,” Woods said. “These species are mostly found in pristine forests with very small distributions – for example, one species lives on a mountain top and nowhere else. These traits make these species susceptible to going extinct.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Featured, Forests, Logging, Mining, New Species, Old Growth Forests, Population, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Research, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests Banner image:  Zephyrarchaea barrettae from Stirling Range National Park, Western Australia. Photo courtesy of Michael G. Rix and Mark S. Harvey, Western Australia Museum via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)Citations:Wood, H. M., & Scharff, N. (2018). A review of the Madagascan pelican spiders of the genera Eriauchenius O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1881 and Madagascarchaea gen. n.(Araneae, Archaeidae). ZooKeys, 727, 1.Hansen, M. C., P. V. Potapov, R. Moore, M. Hancher, S. A. Turubanova, A. Tyukavina, D. Thau, S. V. Stehman, S. J. Goetz, T. R. Loveland, A. Kommareddy, A. Egorov, L. Chini, C. O. Justice, and J. R. G. Townshend. 2013. “High-Resolution Global Maps of 21st-Century Forest Cover Change.” Science 342 (15 November): 850–53. Data available on-line from:http://earthenginepartners.appspot.com/science-2013-global-forest. Accessed through Global Forest Watch on February 6, 2018. www.globalforestwatch.orgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In blood-sucking leeches, scientists find a genetic snapshot of local wildlife

first_imgArticle published by Sue Palminteri data collection, DNA, Forests, Genetics, Mammals, Monitoring, Research, Surveying, surveys, Technology, Wildtech FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Scientists have identified mammals present at sites in Asia by examining the DNA in the blood sucked by leeches.They found that the nearly 750 Haemadipsa (blood-sucking) leeches stored the DNA of a diversity of other species, from mice to monkeys and birds, not to mention humans and domestic animals.Collecting terrestrial leeches is fast, cheap, and easy (they come to you!), and they feed on a broad spectrum of mammals, enabling them to serve as cost-effective tools for determining the presence of even scarce and elusive species. The arduous task of assessing animal populations in the wild takes plenty of sweat and tears. Now a group of scientists is adding blood to that mix, in an innovative method that takes field surveying to a sanguine yet promising extreme.The hero of this tale is the humble blood-sucking leech, an invertebrate that feeds off a wide range of animals, from birds to mammals to humans, and whose vampiric qualities led to their use in historic and some current medical treatments.But where the blood drawn by leeches was once considered full of vile humors, now researchers see in it a treasure trove of DNA that sheds light on the animals that the leeches feed on.It’s looking for you. A leech of the terrestrial Haemadipsa (blood-sucking) genus senses and reaches out to a potential source of lunch. Photo © AMNH/M. SiddallResearchers from the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), the University of Delaware, and Kunming Institute of Zoology in China/University of East Anglia in the U.K. have used genetic analyses to identify the animals preyed upon by a given parasitic leech in the remains of the leech’s most recent meals. Scientists can extract invertebrate-parasite-derived DNA (iDNA) of host mammals because leeches store blood meals inside them for several months after feeding.Building on a 2012 pilot study of the use of iDNA methods to detect mammal presence at a site in Vietnam, the team tested the utility of leeches to assess Asian mammal communities across a broader range of geographic locations.A Haemadipsa leech not currently seeking a meal. Photo © AMNH/M. SiddallLead author Michael Tessler, a postdoctoral fellow at AMNH’s Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, told Mongabay-Wildtech the 2012 investigation was “an absolutely pioneering study” that used around 25 leeches to screen for mammals in a concentrated area in Vietnam.“Given the promising results of Schnell et al. [2012], we wanted to see if the method could be applied over much of the range of these terrestrial leeches (Haemadipsa),” Tessler said in an email. To accomplish this, the researchers analyzed the blood meals remaining inside nearly ~750 leeches from sites in Bangladesh, Cambodia, and China.“We also took note of the leeches themselves to look for new species that had previously been overlooked,” Tessler said.Haemadipsa (blood-sucking) leeches readily attack humans, so they are fast, cheap, and easy to collect. “It’s quick and easy to survey a park in this way, as you don’t really need to search for the leeches—they come to you looking for a meal,” Tessler said in a statement.Collecting leeches in the field is easier than camera trapping or observing birds or mammals. The data vehicle comes to you. In this study, the researchers collected leeches attached to their clothing, but not themselves. Photo © AMNH/L. Berniker“A snapshot of the vertebrates in an area can be taken with just one day’s worth of sampling,” Tessler said. Using camera traps, the current standard for surveys, “takes months or longer,” he added.The researchers then extracted and sequenced the samples of residual DNA from the collected leeches to determine to which host species they belonged. For this analysis, they used primers optimized for detecting mammal DNA.An effective survey toolThe researchers found that the leeches fed on a unexpectedly broad range of species.“What is most surprising and exciting is how generalized the leeches seem to be in their feeding across their ranges,” Tessler said. “This means they should be an excellent tool for surveying mammals both large and small, carnivore or herbivore, nocturnal or diurnal. As leech biologists, we were also shocked to find these leeches feeding on ground birds and even once on a bat, as these do not appear to be hosts commonly reported in the literature.”This relatively fast and low-cost technique detected the presence of both the birds and various smaller-bodied mammals, such as rats, squirrels, civets, and tiny mouse deer, which can be difficult to capture with camera traps.Mouse deer, the world’s smallest hooved mammals, are just one of a variety of Asian mammal groups preyed upon by leeches. Photo credit: Uspn (Bjørn Christian Tørrissen) CC 3.0“Our recent work has demonstrated that we can determine what mammals are in a protected area without hunting, without trapping, without the use of scat or hair samples, and especially without camera traps-all of which are problematic methods for one reason or another,” co-author Mark Siddall, a curator at AMNH’s Division of Invertebrate Zoology, said in a statement.Scientists are still exploring possible limitations of assessing mammal communities from the DNA in leeches. These could include leeches’ host specificity, habitat preferences, time lapse between collection and the leech’s last feeding, as well as possible DNA contamination in the analysis process.The researchers also examined the genetic structure of the leech populations to identify possible prey specialists. They determined that the two described species of the Haemadipsa genus actually represent up to 15 different groupings, called clades, suggesting that future taxonomic work may distinguish additional species.The photogenic tiger leech (Haemadipsa picta) is one of the better-known leech species. Photo credit: Dick Culbert, CC 2.0Some samples in this study lacked sufficient vertebrate DNA to be successfully sequenced. The methods, which are still being tested, may not be equally effective across all leech genera.Nevertheless, the authors state in their paper: “While the leeches generally appear to prefer ground-dwelling species, no pattern was evident between leeches of a given clade and their prey.” In shorth, they say, the findings suggest “the iDNA technique may be robust for finding vertebrates in an area regardless of which leech species is reviewed.”Analyzing mammal DNA from easy-to-collect leeches could save future mammal research teams time and money to survey the more elusive species found at a given site.“As the method is focused on DNA, this type of study could easily sequence several genetic markers and study the population genetics of the mammals of conservation interest,” Tessler said. “This type of work usually requires actually trapping the mammal of interest, which is hard to do and incredibly stressful to the mammal, or finding fresh scat, which can be very difficult to find.”center_img ReferenceTessler, M., Weiskopf, S. R., Berniker, L., Hersch, R., Mccarthy, K. P., Yu, D. W., & Siddall, M. E. (2018). Bloodlines: mammals, leeches, and conservation in southern Asia. Systematics and Biodiversity, 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1080/14772000.2018.1433729 Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

More than 40 percent of Madagascar’s freshwater life sliding toward extinction, IUCN finds

first_imgIn an assessment of 653 freshwater plant and animal species living on Madagascar and nearby islands, biologists found that 43 percent are threatened with extinction or there isn’t enough information to assess how well they’re doing.Nearly 80 percent of endemic plants examined in the study face extinction.The team lists unsustainable farming practices, deforestation, dam construction, mining and the overuse of natural resources, such as overfishing, as causes for the widespread declines. Madagascar is known as an ark for biodiversity that’s found nowhere else on the planet. Unfortunately, it’s also known for the bevy of threats that those distinctive species that live in its rainforests, woodlands and wetlands face. Now, the International Union for Conservation of Nature reports that many of the plants and animals living in the island’s freshwater habitats, as well as those of other southern Indian Ocean islands, are also being pushed closer to extinction.A team of biologists compared known data on 653 freshwater species, ranging from fish and crabs to dragonflies and aquatic plants, and they found that 43 percent were either threatened with extinction or else scientists didn’t have enough information to assess how well they were doing. That’s more than double the proportion of threatened freshwater species on the African continent, according to a 2011 IUCN biodiversity survey.A rice paddy in Madagascar. The authors of the report pointed to unsustainable agricultural practices as a primary driver of species declines. Photo by Mike Averill, courtesy of IUCN.More than 150 dragonfly species that the scientists looked at are endemic to Madagascar, meaning they’re found nowhere else in the world. Other endemics include a genus of freshwater snails that bear live young. Two of the species, Madagasikara madagascariensis and Madagasikara johnsoni, are classified as endangered.The authors identified unsustainable farming — which they write includes the traditional slash-and-burn technique used by subsistence farmers around the world — as the most serious threat, particularly when it involves the drainage of wetlands to increase the amount of arable land. Deforestation, dam construction and mining also play a part in fouling bodies of freshwater, which in turn puts pressure on the plants and animals that live in them.The authors said the overuse of natural resources, as in the case of overfishing, was a significant catalyst in driving down the numbers of some species. That finding is particularly concerning for the Malagasy people of Madagascar, said Laura Máiz-Tomé, an IUCN program officer and one of the report’s editors.A blue-faced featherleg damselfly (Proplatycnemis pseudalatipes), which scientists have found only in Madagascar. Photo © Allan Brandon, courtesy of IUCN.“Given the poverty levels in the country, the Malagasy people depend heavily on freshwater species for their livelihoods, through fisheries or the use of plants to make baskets for example,” Máiz-Tomé said in a statement. “To halt this dramatic decline, capacity building for conservation of these environmentally and economically valuable species should be made a priority.”The 23 percent of plant and animal species that fall into the “data deficient” category highlights an important void in our understanding of Madagascar’s biodiversity, said William Darwall, who leads IUCN’s freshwater biodiversity unit and who edited the report.“We urgently need more research to effectively conserve species in this hotspot for global biodiversity,”Darwall said in the statement.Freshwater crayfish (Astacoides granulimanus), endemic to Madagascar, for sale at a market. Photo © Christian Ranaivoson, courtesy of IUCN.The research revealed that aquatic plants found only in Madagascar are particularly threatened, said Sylvie Andriambololonera, a coordinator with one of the partners in the study, the Missouri Botanical Garden. Nearly 80 percent of endemic plants examined in the study are creeping toward extinction. But as with the animal species, the findings exposed how little we know about Madagascar’s freshwater plant life.“Many [plant] species had not been recorded in the 50 years preceding this study, highlighting a need for more continuous field assessments,” Andriambololonera said in the statement. “Up to date assessments reduce gaps in our knowledge and ensure we can prioritise species for conservation.”Banner image of a dragonfly in Madagascar by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannonCITATIONMáiz-Tomé, L., Sayer, C. and Darwall, W. (eds) (2018). The status and distribution of freshwater biodiversity in Madagascar and the Indian Ocean islands hotspot. Gland, Switzerland: IUCN. viii+128pp.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Birds, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forestry, Forests, Freshwater Animals, Freshwater Ecosystems, Freshwater Fish, freshwater turtles, Insects, Iucn, Mangroves, Mass Extinction, Mining, Molluscs, Plants, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Ecological Services, Rainforest Mining, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Research, Saving Species From Extinction, Sixth Mass Extinction, Slash-and-burn, Sustainable Development, Threats To Rainforests, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wetlands, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

Pontejos hopes to see more international exposure for PH women’s team

first_imgJanine Pontejos. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netThe Philippine women’s national team failed to win a single game in the Fiba 3×3 World Cup, but a winless slate did not dampen the spirits of one of its central figures.Janine Pontejos captivated the basketball-watching public when she erupted for seven long balls in Perlas’ last two games in the group stage and she didn’t stop her shooting exploits in just the games alone.ADVERTISEMENT “I think it’s very obvious that women’s basketball is largely neglected in the country and that showed in the Fiba 3×3 tournament where we had a competitive team but everything they achieved they did on their own,” said Mascariñas in Filipino. “We can do better if there’s support for women’s basketball, and we are willing to support the development of women’s basketball.”Pontejos hoped that Perlas could play in more international tournaments not just in the 3-on-3 format but also in the 5-on-5 one especially that the team wasn’t elected to represent the Philippines in the Asian Games.“Hopefully we’re given a chance to show our talents against other countries and I hope we have more opportunities to play,” said Pontejos. “I think what we did in the World Cup will lead to more opportunities for us.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew All is well with PetroGazz after miscommunication China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls LATEST STORIES “We’ve shown that we can’t just compete here in the Philippines but we can also go against the bigger countries and its better players.”READ: Height disparity too much for Pontejos, Perlas vs Spain And Pontejos just found a viable supporter in her wishes for women’s basketball to go further.Bounty Agroventures president Ronald Mascariñas, the parent company of Chooks to Go, promised to lend a helping hand for women’s basketball in the Philippines.The Philippines is ranked no.47 in the Fiba women’s rankings and Mascariñas said that ranking could go higher with the right support.ADVERTISEMENT Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Weinstein rape trial Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding MOST READ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displaced The 5-foot-5 gunner was also named as the tournament’s best shooter in both the men’s and women’s division after taking the gold in the shooting competition.READ: Janine Pontejos gets gold in Fiba 3×3 shootout FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownAnd with the newfound awareness Perlas got after the Fiba 3×3 World Cup, Pontejos hopes the women’s national team would have more exposure in the future.“I think we’ve shown them the talent of women basketball players from the Philippines,” said Pontejos in Filipino during their thanksgiving party Thursday at Holiday Inn. Winfrey details her decision to withdraw from Simmons film In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ View commentslast_img read more

Manchester United target set for summer transfer

first_img1 Burnley manager Sean Dyche admits striker Danny Ings is unlikely to be at the club next season.The 22-year-old striker is out of contract in the summer and with the Clarets heading for the Championship following relegation last week, Ings is set for pastures new.Manchester United and Real Sociedad have both been linked with moves for the England Under-21 striker who has scored 10 goals in his maiden Premier League campaign.Ings was desperate to make that 11 during Saturday’s 0-0 draw with Stoke in what looks certain to be his Turf Moor swansong, but he was denied on three separate occasions by Potters keeper Jack Butland.Dyche does not expect to have Ings at his disposal as he plots an instant return to the Premier League next season.He said: “When I got here he was a developing player, still learning, still improving but there was still a lot of work done be done with him. He has accepted it, ran with it and moved forward and that’s all you can ask for with players.“It’s good to see his development. It looks like it is not going to continue with us, but I think we have played a big part in how he has moved forward.”Dyche added on the club’s official website: “You can never give 100 per cent guarantees.“It’s probable that was a farewell from Danny though. The sounds coming out of him and his agent make it probably that we will be going elsewhere.“There is a kind of message going out that they will be looking for pastures now. That’s sometimes happens in football and every player has the right to run their contract down if they want to, so we will see what happens in the summer.” Burnley striker Danny Ings last_img read more

THE COUNCIL ‘CANOE’ LEAVE OUR ROADS IN THIS CONDITION!

first_imgMicheal could need a lifejacket going for a pint of milk to the shops.Local election candidate Micheal Cholm Mac Giolla Easbauig has always been one to paddle his own canoe.But going for a paddle in his own canoe to highlight the state of West Donegal’s roads goes above and beyond the call of duty.This road at Arland is in such a bad state of repair that ten families find it impassable most days because of the number of potholes. Micheal says Donegal County Council has classified the road as private and so it will be a long time before the road is addressed.He is now calling for a reintroduction of the Local Improvement Scheme which catered for non-pubic road repairs.“This road is in a terrible state and these potholes are just unacceptable.“People cannot just be ignored like this when the road is classified as private. People have a basic right to transport when they are paying road tax,” he said.  THE COUNCIL ‘CANOE’ LEAVE OUR ROADS IN THIS CONDITION! was last modified: February 1st, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:canoeDonegal County CouncilpotholesWest Donegallast_img read more