Field Notes: Finding Jacobo; an Andean cat captivates conservationists

first_imgFor more on the topic:Lucherini M, Palacios R, Villalba L, Iverson E. (2012) A new Strategic Plan for the conservation of the Andean cat. Oryx. Vol. 46, pp. 16-17.Novaro AJ, Walker S, Palacios R, et al. (2010) Endangered Andean cat distribution beyond the Andes in Patagonia. Cat News. Vol. 53, pp. 8-10.Villalba L, Lucherini M, Walker S, Lagos N, Cossios D, Bennett M, Huaranca J. 2016. Leopardus jacobita. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T15452A50657407.Walker S, Funes M, Heidel L, Palacios R. (2014) The Endangered Andean cat and fracking in Patagonia. Oryx. Vol. 48, pp. 14-15.Jacobo explores his release site in a remote park. A few moments later this “ghost cat”, first seen wandering a Bolivian soccer field, vanished back into the wild. Photo by Juan Reppucci / courtesy of Andean Cat Alliance Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Carnivores, Cats, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forgotten Species, GPS, GPS tracking, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Hunting, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Mining, Over-hunting, Restoration, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation The Andean cat ranges from remote areas of central Peru to the Patagonian steppe. Perfectly adapted to extreme environments, this small feline is threatened by habitat degradation and hunting, but most of all it suffers from anonymity: it’s hard to save an animal that no one ever sees.So few of these endangered cats are scattered across such vast landscapes that even most of their advocates have never seen the species they’re trying to protect. But the conservation efforts that could save this cat could also preserve the wild places where Andean cats live.When a male Andean cat was found wandering around a soccer field, Andean Cat Alliance members agreed to forego the extraordinary opportunity to study the animal in captivity, and try instead to return “Jacobo” to the wild.Andean Cat Alliance coordinators Rocío Palacios and Lilian Villalba orchestrated the multinational volunteer release effort. Conservationists equipped Jacobo with a GPS collar and hope that tracking his travels will reveal new data about this secretive cat, considered a symbol of the Andes. Andean cats suffer from an identity crisis: with so few of them prowling around such a large mountainous Latin American landscape, most people don’t know what they look like. Photo courtesy of Andean Cat AllianceWhen an Andean cat (Leopardus jacobita) suddenly showed up in the middle of a synthetic soccer field in Bolivia, the wild feline was far from anywhere that should have been home. Not knowing what else to do, local people put the Endangered cat in a birdcage to hand it over to authorities.How the housecat-sized feline ended up such a distance from its usual haunts — high in the mountains of Chile, Argentina, Bolivia and Peru — is still a mystery. However, the extraordinary circumstance gave conservationists a chance to learn about an animal they were dedicated to saving, but had rarely seen.It isn’t easy to find an Andean cat. Only 1,378 adults exist, with the small cats scattered over more than 150,000 square kilometers (roughly 600,000 square miles) of highlands from northeastern Peru to Patagonia, according to the first population numbers published last year on the IUCN red list website. This single population estimate is one of the biggest successes of the Andean Cat Alliance because estimating the population numbers for such a low density species is a huge challenge, says Rocío Palacios, biologist and co-coordinator of the organization, which has teams of volunteers dedicated to protecting this wild feline across its whole range.Only 1,378 adult Andean cats exist, with the small cats scattered across more than 150,000 square kilometers (roughly 600,000 square miles) of highlands from northeastern Peru to Patagonia. Photo courtesy of Andean Cat AllianceThe paw prints of an Andean Cat. Sightings of these Endangered felines are so rare that information is usually gleaned from scat and camera trap images. Photo courtesy of Andean Cat AllianceAlthough the cats live in remote areas, at elevations up to 12,000 feet, their habitat is rich with deposits of coal, oil and minerals such as tin, silver, and gold, so the reclusive feline increasingly competes with the mining industry for territory. They’re also threatened by local hunters who, in an effort to protect livestock from larger predators, often kill the small cats, too.The thick-coated wild cats also suffer from an identity crisis. With so few prowling such a large landscape, most people don’t even know what they look like. If spotted, Andean cats may be mistaken for the pampas cat that lives in overlapping habitat. With such a low profile, it can be tough to generate support for conservation.“This is more than saving a cat,” says Palacios. “This animal is a symbol of the Andes. When we talk about saving this cat, we’re talking about saving an entire landscape.”For many conservationists, time spent with Jacobo counts as their first sighting of an Andean cat. Rocío Palacios looks on here, as Jacobo undergoes anesthesia in preparation for a veterinary examination. “Now, even when I’m not directly involved in tracking Jacobo, I’m always trying to find out where he is; he’s like a kid that goes to study abroad, everybody is checking to see how he is doing,” says Palacios. Photo courtesy of Andean Cat AllianceMongabay: What motivates you to save an animal you never see?Palacios: I get that question a lot. At first, that was really hard to answer because I couldn’t understand this feeling that you need to see the animal that you are studying to be able to work with that animal.I’ve always loved to study carnivores but where I live, in Argentina, there are no big lions. We have smaller cats and they are always on the move, so it’s really hard to find them. So, it’s detective work: I look for signs and tracks to deduce what the cats have been doing, how they interact with each other. From gathering evidence, we construct the life history. But it’s not just about the cat. The cat is a symbol of what I’m working for.One of the most powerful experiences in my life happened the first time I went to the Andes, looking for the cat and collecting scat. I was sitting on a rock and couldn’t see any sign of humans — no people, no roads, not another human thing — in any direction. Even though I had been going to the mountains since I was a kid, I had never before experienced that feeling of completely blending with nature.Conservation can be a really challenging profession; a lot of times it looks like the battle is already lost. The Andean cat is like my secret weapon, a symbol of that memory of totally blending into nature.Photo traps provide much of the current information about Andean cats. Tracking collars that work well on this small cat are hard to find. VHF signals, for example, are not the most effective tool in the rugged mountain terrain, where, if a cat is sleeping in a cave, you could be standing right above it and not receive a signal. Photo courtesy of Andean Cat AllianceMongabay: What have conservationists learned from Jacobo?Palacios: Finding Jacobo was a powerful thing. The researchers and professionals who volunteer for the AGA (Alianza Gato Andino is the Spanish name for the Andean Cat Alliance) have worked together for a long time and we are always facing questions about the cat’s life history: How many kittens do they have? What is the breeding season? What is their phsiology? These are basic questions that we cannot answer because we’ve never had one in captivity to study. Before Jacobo, we didn’t even know the composition of the cat’s blood.Immediately after Jacobo was found, it was determined the best place to keep him was at the Vesty Pakos State Zoo in La Paz [Bolivia]. They made special enclosures for him, so he wouldn’t get used to humans, and took very good care of him — he even gained a couple of pounds while he was there.An inter-institutional committee was formed, organized by AGA, to follow up on everything related to Jacobo’s wellbeing. We planned to release him after the winter, when the weather wouldn’t be so harsh. Then he started to show signs of stress in captivity — a giant alert sign that we needed to release him very quickly. It began to feel like an emergency.Even though we all wanted the same thing, it was hard to work together because people were in different countries and everyone has a “day job” to pay the bills. Also, the release process itself was complex. For example, we needed a blood test to make sure Jacobo was healthy before his release, but there was no lab in Bolivia that could do this, so the sample had to be sent to a specialist in Chile. This required special permits in a short timeframe. After the results came back okay, we needed trucks, release experts and a collar to track him. All of this costs money and — except for the trucks — the AGA financed most of these needed services.Jacobo leaves his cat carrier. Photo by Juan Reppucci/courtesy of Andean Cat AllianceThe tracking technology is not well developed for small cats and you can’t just custom-order it for one individual. Only 5 Andean cats have ever been collared and we haven’t collected nearly enough information from them. The first cat, named Sombrita, was collared in Bolivia and about six months later she was killed by a local person who had issues with the protected area recently established in the region. Later, more cats were collared in Argentina, but each one had some kind of problem; the collars fell off too quickly or just stopped recording. There is just not proper technology developed for this kind of species, so most of our data has been from scat and camera traps.Finally, everything came together and we released Jacobo in Sajama National Park, in Bolivia. After the first few days of tracking his radio signal, he began venturing farther away from the site.Mongabay: What are the next steps for Andean cat conservation?Palacios: Our immediate goal is to stop the hunting. When I was finishing my research in northern Patagonia, more than half of the records for that dissertation work came from dead cats. That’s more than 20 dead cats, a huge number for a low-density species.Part of our mitigation program in Chile and Argentina includes training guard dogs to keep predators away from goat herds in the [mountain] communities. That way the small cats won’t get killed along with the mountain lions, which are the real livestock predators. We want to expand that program as quickly as possible.Another part of that program brings artists to schools where they help children paint murals that show the Andean cat and his important place in the landscape. In these isolated areas, the schools are a gathering place for the community, so everyone sees these conservation messages.We also need pure research at the population genetics level. It may sound boring, but I have a strong suspicion there may be two subspecies of Andean cats, and we need to know [whether that is true or not] to adjust our conservation actions.Jacobo in close up, just moments after his release. Photo by Juan Reppucci / courtesy of Andean Cat AllianceNext year, we also want to start a monitoring network in protected areas. This was my main project in previous fieldwork. If this is well applied, the Andean cat becomes part of the action plan for protected areas. That works as a conservation tool because it helps detect sudden changes in population trends.And of course, there is Jacobo. We need to keep following him. He was released in a very remote site, in a park that straddles Bolivia and Chile. When we went to the field to look for [radio collar] signals in October, November, and December, there was a far away signal once, and then never again. We are trying to arrange an overflight to look for him one more time before the radio battery dies.Even though it’s disappointing not to know exactly where he is, it’s a good thing that Jacobo moved away from his release site, looking for a proper place to make his own territory. He is out there somewhere and, because every individual matters, we know we did the best thing possible by releasing him.Jacobo is a lot more than just another cat for us; he’s a symbol of the Andes. Like a living being needs a soul, the soul of the Andes is represented by Jacobo. Article published by Glenn Scherer Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Vaquita survival hinges on stopping international swim bladder trade

first_imgFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Banner image of totoaba and vaquita by Omar Vidal. Recent investigations by the Elephant Action League and WWF have uncovered the complicated trade in fish swim bladders from the Gulf of California that is pushing a porpoise known as the vaquita toward extinction.A two-year-old gillnet ban so far has not yet stemmed the declining numbers of vaquita, which are down 50 percent since 2015 and 90 percent since 2011.Not more than 30 vaquita remain in the wild, making it the most endangered cetacean on the planet.The swim bladders can sell for as much as $20,000 per kilogram. Totoaba maws, or swim bladders, for sale in China. Photo courtesy of the Elephant Action LeagueNew evidence lays out the intricate trade in animal body parts that conservation groups say are driving two marine species in Mexico’s Gulf of California closer to extinction. The battle to save them will have to be fought on fronts in several countries.The vaquita (Phocoena sinus), a tiny porpoise that averages just 43 kilograms (95 pounds) and 1.5 meters (5 feet), is the world’s most endangered cetacean, a group that includes whales and dolphins. In large measure, that’s because they share their habitat with a fish called the totoaba (Totoaba macdonaldi) in a small slice of the Sea of Cortez between mainland Mexico and the Baja California peninsula. Gillnets intended for totoaba, as well as other fish, efficiently ensnare vaquita. Their numbers have plunged by 90 percent since 2011, according to a recent report by the conservation group WWF.Surging demand in China for the totoaba’s swim bladder, or “maw,” which helps the fish to float, is driving the harvest, sweeping up vaquita in the process, according to the report from WWF and a separate investigation by the watchdog group Elephant Action League. The totoaba itself is a Critically Endangered species according to the IUCN. To protect the vaquita, the organizations argue for a multinational effort to stop the flow of totoaba maws out of Mexico and through countries such as the U.S., as well as curbing the demand for them in southeastern China.“Given the dire circumstances surrounding vaquitas and the issues associated with the totoaba swim bladder trade in Mexico, including possible corruption and involvement of drug cartels, it is vital to fully research, investigate, and map all aspects of the totoaba supply chain,” said Andrea Crosta, executive director of the watchdog group Elephant Action League (EAL), in a statement.An acoustic monitoring program by WWF revealed that almost half of all vaquita, which lives only in the Gulf of California, disappeared in the past two years. The Mexican government responded with a temporary gillnet ban in 2015, which it renewed on May 31. But Jorge Rickards, acting CEO of WWF-Mexico, said that Mexico needs to make sure fishers are complying with the ban.Vaquita swimming in the Gulf of California. Only 30 remain in the wild. Photo by Paula Olson“This extension will not be enough to save the vaquita and its valuable habitat,” Rickards said in a statement from WWF. “We have seen vaquita numbers continue to plummet over the last two years because the existing ban was not sufficiently enforced and gillnets continue to threaten the Upper Gulf of California.”Gillnets are set vertically in the water column to trap fish as they swim by. WWF and other organizations have criticized their use, saying that they are indiscriminately destructive, snagging not just the target fish, but anything that swims through one of the nets’ holes and gets stuck. Both EAL and WWF blame this fishing method for the decimation of the vaquita population, which now sits at fewer than 30 individuals.“Mexico must commit to a permanent gillnet ban, and that commitment must be matched by collective action across borders,” said Leigh Henry, a senior policy advisor at WWF-US, in the WWF statement.The reports from EAL and WWF contend that China and the U.S. should shoulder some of the responsibility for facilitating the maw trade. EAL’s investigation indicated that Hong Kong and Taiwan may also serve as waypoints before the maws ultimately end up in the hands of buyers – for more than $20,000 a kilogram (about $9,100 per pound) on average – in China. There, the maws are used in traditional medicine and as gifts in business dealings.An illustration of a vaquita, the world’s smallest porpoise (and cetacean), averaging 43 kilograms and 1.5 meters. Image by Marcelo Otero/Greenpeace Mexico, courtesy of WWFEAL’s undercover investigation also revealed that players key to the trade of these body parts may live in the U.S. and Mexico. Despite the fact that maws are illegal in China, the group also found that demand from the southeastern province of Guangdong is “stable,” which is bad news for the remaining vaquita.“Vaquita are collateral damage of the global wildlife crime epidemic, plummeting toward extinction because of an illegal trade that has nothing to do with them,” WWF’s Henry said. “Mexico, the U.S. and China need to act immediately and decisively to kill the trade that’s killing the vaquita.”WWF also called upon the treaty organization CITES – short for Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora – and others to step up their work to hold these countries accountable.“The vaquita has no more time left,” Rickards said. “It needs action today.”NOAA Fisheries picture from 1992 showing a vaquita captured as bycatch (bottom) along with a totoaba (top) in Sonora, Mexico. Photo by Omar Vidal Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Biodiversity, Bycatch, China’s Demand For Resources, Cites, Conservation, Defaunation, Dolphins, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Fish, Fishing, Mammals, Marine, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Mammals, Megafauna, Ocean Crisis, Oceans, Overfishing, Vaquita, Wildlife Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

Shipping companies face criminal charges after coal barges damage reef in Indonesian marine park

first_imgCoal, Coral Reefs, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Environment, Environmental Law, Fish, Fisheries, Law Enforcement, Oceans, Protected Areas Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In two separate incidents this winter, five coal-carrying vessels ran aground on reefs in Central Java’s Karimunjava National Park.The boats were given permission to take shelter in the area during storms, but broke loose from their moorings, damaging 1,400 square meters of coral.Officials are pressing charges of gross negligence and seeking financial compensation.These incidents preceded a March case in which a cruise ship ran aground on a reef in Raja Ampat in eastern Indonesia. Indonesian authorities have indicted five local shipping companies on charges of gross negligence after their coal barges damaged coral reefs in a Javan marine park, a local official told Mongabay.About 1,400 square meters (15,000 square feet) of reef in Central Java’s Karimunjava National Park were wrecked when five coal-carrying vessels separately ran aground during storms Jan. 14 and Feb. 10, according to the head of the Karimunjava National Park Agency, Agus Prabowo.One of seven marine national parks in Indonesia, Karimunjava (also known as Karimunjawa) is known for its extraordinary coral reefs — which include two protected biota species, black coral (Antiphates sp.) and organ pipe coral (Tubipora musica). Nearly 500 species of reef fish thrive in the waters around Karimunjava, and the park is a popular tourist attraction among divers and snorkelers from Indonesia and abroad.Reef life in Karimunjava National Park. According to WCS Indonesia, the park is home to some 500 species of reef fish and 300 species of coral. Photo by Stella Nostra G. A. via Wikimedia Commons.According to Prabowo, the vessels that damaged the reefs were granted permission by the head of the local port to make an emergency detour and take shelter at the park’s islets — Cilik and Tengah — due to bad weather.But in each case the ships’ mooring lines broke as strong currents dragged the boats to the reef, he added.“We are trying to prove if there was actually negligence by the boat captains,” said Prabowo by phone, adding that the Central Java police are handling the case.The ship operators are Jakarta-based PT Sindu Mulia and PT Pancaran Samudera Transport; Surabaya-based PT Pancamerak Samudera; Bintan-based PT Nasional Bina Buana; and Samarinda-based PT Peti Samudera Adi Jaya, according to the park agency.Under Indonesia’s 2009 Environmental Law, individuals convicted of damaging the environment through negligence face a maximum of 3-years imprisonment and fines of up to 3 billion Indonesian rupiah ($224,000).On top of the criminal charges, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry’s law-enforcement body has been in negotiations for compensation with the companies’ insurers, said Prabowo.“The amount of settlement should consider many aspects, such as environmental damages and social economy impacts,” he said.Karimunjava’s clear water and extraordinary coral reefs make it popular among local and international divers and snorklers. Photo by Batara via Flickr.The boats trashed coral from various genera, such as acropora, porites and diploria, environmental activist Amiruddin told local media. A coordinator at the NGO Indonesia Coral Reefs Action Network (I-CAN), Amiruddin was involved in the preliminary investigation.The damage to the coral reef was estimated to reach about 28 billion Indonesian rupiah, Abdul Rachim, head of local green group Central Java Environmental Partnership Network (Jamilah) reported to state news agency Antara.“The compensation will be used to revive the damaged area, and the restoration will be the responsibility of the companies,” Prabowo said, adding that the firms have been “pretty cooperative” with the government in handling the case.Declared in 2001 as a marine reserve, the park — which houses 22 islands stretching across 1,100 square kilometers (425 square miles) — is part of the Karimunjava Archipelago, also known Crimon Java.The reserve has nine zones in which different activities are permitted, such as traditional fishing, tourism or scientific research, in accordance with 2012 regulations by the Natural Resources Conservation Directorate General (KSDA) at the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.Although the park is protected, various activities are allowed within different zones of the park, and the islands have busy boat traffic. Photo by Fachrul Stream via Wikimedia Commons.Despite its protected status, Karimunjava’s reefs face multiple threats including trawl fishing, global warming and irresponsible diving and snorkeling, said Prabowo.“We have marine police patrolling twice a month across the national park to check on fishermen’s activities. Also, we have asked the locals to spread the word about fighting against destructive fishing,” Prabowo said when asked about his agency’s efforts in preventing hazards to the marine ecosystem.“What’s important is a working cooperation between the authorities and the people in managing Karimunjava National Park,” he added.The Indonesian government is mulling the revision of its ocean regulations in order to beef up security in its marine protected zones in the wake of a Bahamian-flagged cruise ship grounding that wrecked 18,882 square meters of coral reef in the Raja Ampat islands in March.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Banner image: A bi-color angelfish swims in coral, courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.center_img Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

Pangolin hunting skyrockets in Central Africa, driven by international trade

first_imgAnimals, Anti-poaching, Biodiversity, Bushmeat, Charismatic Animals, Cites, Conservation, Consumption, Corruption, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Hunting, Illegal Trade, Mammals, Meat, Overexploitation, Pangolins, Poachers, Poaching, Rainforests, Research, Sub-saharan Africa, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The study pulled together information on markets, prices and hunting methods for pangolins from research in 14 countries in Africa.Pangolins are hunted for their meat in some African countries, and their scales are used in traditional medicine, both locally and in several Asian countries, including China.The researchers found that as many as 2.71 million pangolins from three species are killed every year across six Central African countries – at least a 145 percent increase since before 2000.They recommend better enforcement of the 2016 CITES ban across the entire supply chain, from Africa to Asia. Ballooning demand for pangolin scales and meat has driven the hunting of these armored animals up at least 145 percent in Central Africa since before 2000, according to a new study published online July 11 by the journal Conservation Letters.Pangolins have been tagged as “the world’s most heavily trafficked wild mammal,” often for the keratin plates that protect it and are used in Africa and Asia in traditional medicine. But until now, scientists didn’t know how big an impact that illegal trade was having on hunting in Central Africa.“Overexploitation is one of the main pressures driving wildlife, like the pangolins, closer to extinction, yet data to evaluate the pressures underlying species’ declines are scarce,” said Jörn Scharlemann, an ecologist at the University of Sussex in the U.K., in a statement.A black-bellied pangolin (Phataginus tetradactyla) in Central African Republic opportunistically taken for its meat. Photo by John C. Cannon.To understand the scale of the problem, Scharlemann and his colleagues, representing 22 universities and institutions throughout Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America, pulled together information on markets, prices and hunting methods for pangolins from research in 14 countries in Africa.“Collating data from local studies collected by hundreds of researchers allows us to provide vital information on the regional exploitation of African pangolins at a critical time for the survival of these species,” Scharlemann said. “Bringing these individual studies together allows us to see the bigger picture that can help inform conservation policy and provide the evidence to governments across the world required to step-up and take action.”They found that as many as 2.71 million pangolins from three species are killed every year across six Central African countries – Cameroon, Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Republic of Congo. What’s more, the proportion of pangolins compared to other types of hunted animals is 50 times as much as it was four decades ago.But what such numbers mean is still a bit of a mystery, in part because they’re so tough to study.“Pangolins are extremely difficult to see, let alone monitor,” said Fiona Maisels, an ecologist with the Wildlife Conservation Society, in the statement. “They are nocturnal; in the daytime they are either underground or high up in trees, they do not call, make conspicuous nests, or provide us with easily recognizable dung piles.”Pangolins, such as this one in Central African Republic, are elusive animals that are difficult to study. Photo courtesy of Sangha Lodge Pangolin Conservation Project and WCS.Those hurdles have hampered finding a critical piece of information about pangolins, Maisels added: “To date, we have no way of estimating how many still exist in the forests of Central Africa.”The authors did find that 45 percent of the hunted pangolins that appeared in the research weren’t yet fully grown, leading them to conclude that the current level of hunting is unsustainable.Currently, the three pangolin species found in Central Africa’s forests, along with one other found in southern Africa, are all listed as Vulnerable by IUCN. But closer to the epicenter of demand in Asia, their relatives aren’t faring as well. Numbers of the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) have declined by 90 percent, and the IUCN considers all four Asian species either Endangered or Critically Endangered.“Our new study shows that African pangolins are at risk,” said Daniel Ingram, the study’s lead author and a biologist at the University of Sussex. “We now have the opportunity to ensure that these species do not follow the severe declines of the Asian pangolins.”A Temminck’s ground pangolin, pictured here in Namibia. Photo ©Tim Lewthwaite courtesy of WCS.The researchers postulate that rises in demand to fill the void in Asian markets left by the now-scarce Asian species could be a reason for the spike in pangolin prices the authors uncovered. In urban markets, the cost of a giant ground pangolin (Smutsia gigantea) in 2014 was 5.8 times as much as it was in 1993.The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, or CITES, banned the international trade of pangolins in 2016. But, as the authors point out, that directive doesn’t come with the tools to enforce it. That’s left to the countries where the trade occurs.“With hunting increasing, it is crucial we investigate how this links to the illegal wildlife trade,” Ingram said. “The engagement of governments and local people will be critical to the conservation of African pangolins.”The study includes a recommendation to start by tackling local markets for pangolins and by identifying areas where hunting is unsustainable. But the researchers also write that enforcement and monitoring should occur throughout the supply chain, including Asia – and China in particular, where consumer demand is highest – before it’s too late.“If we do not act now to better understand and protect these charismatic animals,” Ingram said, “we may lose them in the future.”CITATIONSChallender, D. W., Waterman, C., & Baillie, J. E. (2014). Scaling up pangolin conservation. IUCN SSC Pangolin Specialist Group Conservation Action Plan. Zoological Society of London, London, UK.Ingram, D. J., Coad, L., Abernethy, K. A., Maisels, F., Stokes, E. J., Bobo, K. S., … & Holmern, T. (2017). Assessing Africa‐Wide Pangolin Exploitation by Scaling Local Data. Conservation Letters.Banner image of a Temminck’s ground pangolin ©Tim Lewthwaite, courtesy of WCS.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Deforestation drops 16% in the Brazilian Amazon

first_imgDeforestation, Environment, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rhett Butlercenter_img Deforestation in the world’s largest rainforest declined 16% over the past year, reports the Brazilian government.The decline in deforestation was not unexpected, but the trend isn’t expected to continue into 2018 given the current drought over large expanses of the Brazilian Amazon.The recent rate of forest loss in the Brazilian Amazon remains well below historic levels. Deforestation in the world’s largest rainforest declined over the past year, reports the Brazilian government.According to preliminary data from Brazil’s national space agency INPE, deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon amounted to 6,624 square kilometers (2,558 square miles) between August, 1 2016 and July 31, 2017. The loss is equivalent to 112 Manhattans or half the U.S. state of Maryland, but is 16 percent lower than the prior year period when 7,893 square kilometers were chopped down.The decline in deforestation was not unexpected. Near-term tracking data from both the Brazilian government and the NGO Imazon showed markedly lower rates of loss on a month by month basis over the past year. But the trend isn’t expected to continue into 2018 given the current drought over large expanses of the Brazilian Amazon, which has contributed to a record number of rural fires in September 2017. Dry conditions in the Brazilian Amazon are typically associated with higher rates of forest loss as farmers, ranchers, and speculators set forests degraded by logging and scrublands ablaze to clear land for crop and pasture.An additional threat to the Brazilian Amazon comes in the form of a political push to weaken environmental laws. Since Michel Temer ascended to the presidency following the impeachment of Dilma Rousseff in May 2016, he has worked with the so-called “ruralista” block in Congress to strip protections from conservation areas, expand mining and infrastructure projects, and loosen regulations on land use.Deforested areas in Oneide and the forested Igarapé Lourdes Indigenous Territory in Rondonia, Brazil. Courtesy of Bing Maps.Nonetheless the recent rate of forest loss in the Brazilian Amazon remains well below historic levels. Deforestation in the region peaked from the 1980s through the mid-2000s and is presently about 75 percent off 2004’s near-record level of 27,772 square kilometers.The data released by INPE is preliminary. Brazil typically releases the “final” assessment in late November or early December once detailed analysis is complete. Occasionally the data is further revised the following year.INPE’s data is based on Landsat satellite images and detects deforestation in areas greater than 6.25 hectares. That means some small-scale deforestation may evade detection by the system, but the year-end data is still much more precise than the monthly alert-based systems which have a resolution of 25 hectares. In recent years, some landowners have started avoiding detection by the alert system by clearing small patches of forest.State deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, 2002-2017, according to INPE data. Background image: Bing Map showing Igarapé Lages Indigenous Area and surrounding region.The Brazilian Amazon is the world’s largest rainforest. Nearly two-thirds of the Amazon rainforest lies within the borders of Brazil.last_img read more

Mangrove deforestation may be releasing more CO2 than Poland, study finds

first_imgA new study calculates that, worldwide, mangroves were storing 4.19 billion metric tons of carbon in 2012, representing a 2 percent loss since 2000. It estimates that number had dropped further to 4.16 billion metric tons by 2017.In total, the study estimates that this lost carbon translates to as much as 317 million tons of CO2 emissions per year, equivalent to the annual emissions of around 67.5 million passenger vehicles in the U.S. and more than the 2015 emissions of Poland.The researchers found Indonesia harbors the lion’s share of the world’s mangroves – around 30 percent – while also experiencing the biggest proportion of its 2000-2012 mangrove carbon loss, with deforestation there accounting for more than 48 percent of the global total. Other parts of Southeast Asia, such as Myanmar, are also undergoing high rates of mangrove deforestation, making the entire region a hotspot of global mangrove carbon loss.Previous research estimates that between 30 and 50 percent of the world’s mangroves have been lost over the past 50 years. Deforestation for shrimp, rice and palm oil are among the biggest drivers of mangrove decline. Seemingly nondescript messes of tangled branches and exposed roots, mangrove forests cling to the coasts of many tropical countries. However, mangroves are far from unexceptional, providing critical ecosystem services like erosion control, flood mitigation and nurseries for fish. Mangroves also store a lot of carbon, with a hectare of mangrove forest sequestering up to four times as much carbon as a similarly sized tract of rainforest.But mangroves are in trouble. Studies estimate between 30 and 50 percent of the world’s mangroves have been lost over the past 50 years as they are deforested for shrimp, rice and palm oil production, drowned by rising seas, and starved of freshwater by dam-building. And as mangroves disappear, so do their wildlife communities and carbon stores.But just how much carbon do mangroves contain, and how much is being lost to their deforestation? To find out, researchers at Salisbury University in the U.S. and National University of Singapore analyzed the carbon content of mangrove vegetation as well as the soil underneath it. Their results were published recently in Nature Climate Change.Mangrove trees are able to survive in environments that would kill most other vegetation.They discovered that, worldwide, mangroves were storing 4.19 billion metric tons of carbon in 2012. Most of this carbon – 70 percent – is locked up in the soil underlying mangroves while the remainder is contained within their living vegetation. The study lists Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia and Papua New Guinea as the world’s top mangrove carbon storehouses, comprising more than half of the total amount of global mangrove carbon.While 4.19 billion metric tons may sound like a lot of carbon, the researchers found that it’s about 2 percent less than the amount stored 12 years prior in 2000. In total, they estimate that this lost carbon translates to as much as 317 million tons of CO2 emissions per year. For perspective, this is equivalent to the annual emissions of around 67.5 million passenger vehicles in the U.S., according to EPA numbers, and more than the 2015 emissions of Poland, according to the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency.The researchers found that, globally, mangrove carbon losses were similar year-to-year between 2000 and 2012. They estimate that if mangrove deforestation rates continued at a similar rate after 2012, then by 2017 mangrove carbon should have dropped a further third of a percent to 4.16 billion metric tons.Mangroves support a high level of biodiversity, providing important habitat for both aquatic and terrestrial wildlife.In addition to estimating how much carbon mangrove deforestation released, the study also looked at the impact of this activity on the mangroves’ overall carbon-sequestering ability. They found that had no mangroves been deforested between 2000 and 2012, then they likely would have taken an additional 3.5 million to 4.5 million metric tons of carbon out of the atmosphere.Zooming in, the study found Indonesia harbors the lion’s share of the world’s mangroves – around 30 percent – while also experiencing the biggest proportion of its 2000-2012 mangrove carbon loss, with deforestation there accounting for more than 48 percent of the global total. Other parts of Southeast Asia, such as Myanmar, are also undergoing high rates of mangrove deforestation, making the entire region a hotspot of global mangrove carbon loss.The study singled out Indonesia as the country with both the most remaining mangroves and the the biggest mangrove carbon losses. Data source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, accessed through Global Forest WatchThe researchers write that as disappearing carbon storage powerhouses, “mangroves are strong candidates for inclusion in nationally determined contributions (NDCs) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and payments for ecosystem services (PES) programs that financially incentivize the conservation of forested carbon stocks.”However, they say that the emissions inventories and monitoring that are used to determine PES compliance require high-quality datasets that exceed their study’s 13-year period. To fill this gap, the researchers recommend more analyses of mangrove carbon stocks and losses, both to establish baselines further back in time – which, they write, are widely lacking for many tropical countries – as well as modeling what may happen in the future. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Aquaculture, carbon, Carbon Dioxide, Climate Change, Coastal Ecosystems, Dams, Ecosystem Services, Ecosystem Services Payments, Environment, Fish, Forests, Global Warming, Mangroves, Oceans, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Research, Rice, Tropical Forests Citation:Hamilton, S. E., & Friess, D. A. (2018). Global carbon stocks and potential emissions due to mangrove deforestation from 2000 to 2012. Nature Climate Change, 1.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

South Korean company under fire for alleged deforestation in Papua oil palm concession

first_imgBanner image: A jungle river in Indonesian Papua. Photo by Rhett A. Butler. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong A report by WRI shows ongoing deforestation in an oil palm concession in Papua, Indonesia, operated by a subsidiary of South Korea’s POSCO Daewoo.The company has responded by saying its operations in Papua are legal and fully permitted.Concerns over deforestation by POSCO Daewoo have prompted other companies to say they will not allow its palm oil into their supply chains. These include big-name brands such as Clorox, Colgate Palmolive, IKEA, L’Oreal, Mars and Unilever.POSCO Daewoo has issued a temporary moratorium on land clearing in its Papua concession and hired a consultant to advise it on how to proceed with its operations there. JAKARTA — A South Korean-owned company previously under fire for clearing vast swaths of pristine forest in Indonesia’s easternmost Papua province has continued to deforest its oil palm concession in an area of rich biodiversity.A report by the World Resources Institute (WRI) shows that 23 square kilometers (8.9 square miles) of forest, an area six times the size of New York City’s Central Park, has been cleared in the past four months in a concession owned by PT Bio Inti Agrindo (PT BIA), a subsidiary of South Korean giant POSCO Daewoo.The concession in Merauke, a district in Papua, spans 342 square kilometers (132 square miles) near the border with Papua New Guinea and overlaps with a WWF Global Ecoregion known for its rich assortment of plants and animals.There are 344 registered bird and 69 mammal species in the region, including a variety of marsupials and birds of paradise, some of which are endangered and only found in this area. Yet the area’s biodiversity remains poorly documented, with many species thought to be undiscovered.The recently deforested area is part of more than 200 square kilometers (77 square miles) of forest cleared in POSCO Daewoo’s concession in Merauke since 2013, according to WRI.POSCO Daewoo, which acquired an 85 percent stake in PT BIA in 2011, said in response to the WRI report that its subsidiary’s operations in Merauke were legal and that it had all the necessary permits.“BIA commenced its business within the legitimate process of permission for a plantation area, which includes various environmental and social assessments,” Joyce Eun Jeong, a spokesperson for POSCO Daewoo, told Mongabay.Map of Papua province (bright green). Photo courtesy of Bwmodular/Wikimedia Commons.Business impactPT BIA began operating in Papua in 2007, when it obtained a permit for the concession in Merauke from the Indonesian Investment Coordinating Board (BPKM).In 2009, it hired CV Bahana Papua Mandiri, a government-accredited consultant, to conduct an environmental impact assessment. The consultant concluded that the land allocated for planting oil palms comprised mostly previously burned forest, in the form of bushes, reeds and secondary forest.The assessment, or Amdal as it’s known in Indonesia, was subsequently approved by the governor of Papua.In a bid to achieve a sustainable operation, PT BIA excluded areas deemed unsuitable for oil palm development, according to its website and its 2017 environmental and social report. Those areas include 35 square kilometers (14 square miles) of wildlife preservation zone, demarcated in 2009; 22 square kilometers (8.5 square miles) of swamp areas in 2013; and areas with high biodiversity, in 2015.Despite these measures, POSCO Daewoo’s operations in Merauke have come under intense scrutiny in recent years due to reports of deforestation and disputes over land with local communities. Concerns over its operations have cost it several high-profile business partners.In 2015, Norway’s central bank divested from POSCO Daewoo over deforestation concerns. In June 2017, the environmental NGO Mighty Earth sent out a letter warning palm oil buyers that buying the commodity from POSCO Daewoo would violate their “no deforestation” and Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) commitments.“We got over fifty responses from companies confirming that POSCO Daewoo is not in their supply chains,” Mighty Earth campaign manager Deborah Lapidus told Mongabay. “And over twenty companies assured us that it would remain excluded.”Companies that said they would exclude POSCO Daewoo from their supply chains until it complied with responsible sourcing commitments include Clorox, Colgate Palmolive, IKEA, L’Oreal, Mars and Unilever. (Of these, only Unilever currently sources some of its palm oil indirectly from POSCO Daewoo; the others are not customers at present.) In December, Boots, the U.K.’s largest drugstore chain, ended its retail partnership with POSCO Daewoo following the Mighty Earth campaign.The stocky, flightless northern cassowary (Casuarius unappendiculatus) is one of the birds-of-paradise for which Papua is famous. Photo by Rhett Butler/MongabayUnannounced moratoriumIn response to the pressure, POSCO Daewoo instated a temporary moratorium on new clearing in its Merauke concession in January, according to the company, and hired an environmental sustainability management consultant.“The management of POSCO Daewoo and BIA agreed that the rest of forest will not be cleared until a professional consulting firm gives advice on the area,” POSCO Daewoo’s Jeong said.She said POSCO Daewoo was seeking advice from the consulting firm on a variety of issues regarding sustainable management for the rest of the PT BIA concession. She added that details would be announced on PT BIA’s website in due time.The temporary moratorium appears to be working to some degree, with less than 10 hectares (25 acres) of forest loss detected by GLAD alerts, a satellite-based system that can detect fine-scale deforestation in near-real time, since the start of 2018.“Our satellite mapping shows that it has indeed greatly slowed clearing in the first couple months of 2018, with just over a hectare of clearance each month,” Lapidus said.However, she questioned POSCO Daewoo’s commitment to preventing further deforestation in the PT BIA concession, saying the company had not yet made an official public announcement about its moratorium. She said the company had also failed to present its future plans, including the sustainability assessments it will conduct, the assessors it will hire, whether it will seek quality reviews, and a timeline for these actions.It’s also not clear that POSCO Daewoo will comply with the recommendations from its consultant; the company continues to deny that it has any problems to fix, and representatives have been quoted in South Korean news reports saying that while they would “consider” the advice of the consultant, they would have to “think about” whether to carry out their recommendations.Lapidus said this made it clear that there was no guarantee POSCO Daewoo would follow through on the sustainability consultant’s advice.“Of course, even if POSCO Daewoo stops clearing today, it has a huge legacy of deforestation, ecological destruction, and human rights abuse that it must restore and remedy,” she said. Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Indonesia, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Protected Areas, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Mock emergency exercise to be performed in Taylor Wednesday morning

first_imgA mock emergency exercise will be put on in Taylor Wednesday morning from 8:30 a.m. until 12 noon. The exercise will consist of a staged accident scene and staged fire on Cherry Avenue east between the district office and Canfor Taylor Pulp.Residents can expect to see fire, RCMP, and BCAS emergency vehicles with lights and sirens. There will be traffic control personnel on the scene to ensure a safe working area.There is the potential for traffic delays. Anyone traveling through at the time will be asked to obey the directions provided by traffic control.- Advertisement -The purpose of the exercise is to test response, communication, and team work between the agencies so they can be as prepared as possible should an emergency situation present itself that affects the community and residents.last_img read more

State on verge of budget crisis

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champThe low end of that estimate represents a gap larger than California’s entire budget for its 172,000-inmate prison system. The high end is equivalent to what the state spends on both prisons and all the state’s University of California campuses in one year. Declaring a fiscal emergency would trigger a special session and force lawmakers and the governor to begin addressing the shortfall within 45 days. “What we have to do is fix the budget system. The system itself needs to be fixed, and I think that this is a good year, this coming year, to fix it,” Schwarzenegger said in Long Beach, where he was promoting his plan for health-care reform. California is struggling with shrinking state tax revenue from the meltdown of the subprime housing market and the credit crunch on Wall Street. State spending also has increased by more than 40 percent since Schwarzenegger took office after the 2003 recall of then-Gov. Gray Davis. SACRAMENTO – Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger says he will declare a fiscal emergency in January to give him and the Legislature more power to deal with the state’s growing deficit. Schwarzenegger made the announcement Friday after meeting with lawmakers and interest groups this week to tell them California’s budget deficit is far worse than economists predicted just a few weeks ago. The shortfall is no longer expected to be $10 billion, but more than $14 billion – a 40 percent jump that would put it in orbit with some of the state’s worst fiscal crises, those who have met with him said. Schwarzenegger said Friday the state could be “anywhere between $10 (billion) and $14billion in the hole.” Schwarzenegger in August signed a $145.5 billion budget that increased spending 11 percent due largely to the increased cost of bond repayments and special funds. General fund spending for day-to-day operations increased less than 1 percent, from $101.7billion to $102.3 billion for the budget year that began July 1. In August, Schwarzenegger’s office projected the state would end its current budget year with a $4.1 billion reserve. Last month, the state’s nonpartisan legislative analyst reported that the state would instead end the year in the red, and was on pace to rack up a staggering $10 billion deficit over the next 18 months. Schwarzenegger and his top aides this week have privately told lawmakers and interest groups that the gap could top $14 billion and warned cities, counties and health and welfare agencies to expect cuts. The governor already has ordered agency leaders to draft plans for an across-the-board cut as high as 10 percent. Schwarzenegger would make the declaration under Proposition 58, the 2004 ballot measure he successfully campaigned for to restrict state borrowing and create a reserve fund. The measure contained a little-known provision authorizing the governor to declare a fiscal emergency if revenue and expenditures fall substantially out of line. The declaration triggers a Constitutional mandate to reopen the current budget and begin cutting costs or finding ways to increase revenue to close the gap. Democratic and Republican leaders said an emergency declaration would be a serious step, but apparently a necessary one, given the state’s growing fiscal problem. “We gave the governor the authority to do that when we wrote the measure, and we will take it seriously and respond to it when it happens,” said Alicia Trost, a spokeswoman for Senate President Pro Tem Don Perata, D-Oakland. Perata said Thursday that the deficit had overtaken lawmakers’ ambitions to pass a universal health-care deal. He said he would not ask fellow senators to vote on a health deal until he knows the extent of Schwarzenegger’s plans to cut the budget. But Schwarzenegger, a Republican, and Democratic Assembly Speaker Fabian Nu ez remained optimistic Friday about reaching a deal to expand health-care coverage before the end of the year. The Assembly is expected to vote on a health-care bill Monday. Assemblyman Roger Niello, R-Fair Oaks, vice chairman of the Assembly Budget Committee, said the planned health-care vote was foolhardy given the state’s deficit. “As the old saying goes, the first thing you should do when you find yourself in a hole is stop digging,” Niello said in a statement. “Our state simply cannot afford the massive government-run health care program that will be voted upon next week.” If Schwarzenegger declares a fiscal emergency in January, he’s required under the law to introduce a plan to correct the problem and to call the Legislature into special session to act on his recommendations. If legislators don’t pass a budget bill within 45 days, lawmakers would be prohibited from acting on any other legislation or adjourning until they reach agreement.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

PASSENGER PULLED TAXI HANDBRAKE AND THREATENED TO RIP METER OFF DASHBOARD

first_imgA man pulled up the handbrake of a taxi and threatened to rip out the car’s meter after he thought the driver was taking him to the local Garda station.Stephen HarperStephen Harper appeared before Letterkenny District Court to face a number of charges. Harper, of Ard Mhullean, Convoy, got a taxi on July 9th last.Once he was in the car he told driver Patrick McDaid that he only had €20 but was told the fare would cost about €25 or €26.Garda Inspector Michael Harrison said the driver gave evidence that he didn’t know what was going to happen as Harper was grabbing his phone from him and also had a bottle of vodka in the car.The driver decided to drive to the Garda station but was confronted by Harper who asked him if he was taking him to the Garda station.Harper, 21, eventually pulled the handbrake of the car and ran off without paying the fare.Mr McDaid said the car came to a screeching halt and had been travelling at about 30 mph.Harper’s solicitor, Mr Kieran Dillon, said his client suffered from ADHD, and had a difficult relationship with his father and the pair had fallen out that day.He said he was very apologetic to the taxi-driver and had posted him the €20 fare which he had not paid.The court heard that Harper had some previous convictions for theft, public order and failing to comply with Gardai.Judge Paul Kelly sentenced Harper to two months in jail but suspended it for 12 months for using threatening and abusive behaviour and 40 hours community service for making off without paying the fare.He took other charges into consideration.And he warned Harper “It’s in your hands to stay out of jail.”PASSENGER PULLED TAXI HANDBRAKE AND THREATENED TO RIP METER OFF DASHBOARD was last modified: March 24th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:convoydonegaldrinkdrunkGardahandbrakeStephen Harpertaxilast_img read more