Reducing Asia’s hunger for rhino horn

first_imgArticle published by Isabel Esterman Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Activism, Animals, Black Rhino, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Megafauna, One-horned Rhinos, Poaching, Rhinos, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Traditional Medicine, White Rhino, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img In 2015, the most recent full year for which data is available, more than 1,350 rhinos were killed for their horns in Africa and Asia.The vast majority of rhino horn is bound for destinations outside of the source country, meaning that conservationists in places like South Africa or India can do little to fight demand.Demand reduction efforts currently center on China and Vietnam, the primary destinations for poached rhino horn.Effective demand reduction campaigns require research into consumer behavior and careful targeting of messages. More than 1,350 rhinoceroses were killed for their horns in 2015 alone. The majority of these killings took place in Africa, where 1,342 were killed. Asia, too, saw 24 of its greater one-horned rhinos succumb to poaching that year, all in India.While countries like South Africa, Namibia, and to a lesser extent India are the source countries for the trade, few poached rhino horns are believed to stay within their borders. Instead, demand is driven primarily by consumers in China and Vietnam, where rhino horn is sold as a luxury good or an ingredient in traditional medicine. Between 2006 and May 2016, a minimum of 528 kilograms (1,164 pounds) of rhino horn was seized in China and at least 442 kilograms (974 pounds) in Vietnam, according to data from the NGO Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA).This means that in recent years, a third of all rhino horn seizures across the globe took place in these countries – 18 percent in China and 15 percent in Vietnam.Vietnamese and Chinese nationals were also involved in poaching cases all over the world. Data collected by EIA since 2006 indicate that 17 percent of seizures involve suspects who are identified as Vietnamese, and over a quarter of offenses involve suspects identified as Chinese nationals.“In Africa, Chinese and Vietnamese syndicates work with locals to source rhino horn, and then rhino horn is smuggled to Asia — sometimes in containers on cargo ships with other illegal commodities such as elephant ivory,” Charlotte Davies, Crime Analyst at EIA told Mongabay in an email.“More often, rhino horns have been detected at airports – throughout Africa, Vietnamese nationals acting as couriers have been caught with rhino horns in their luggage, sometimes in large quantities. Overall, I would say that rhino horn procurement and trafficking by criminal groups, from Africa to Asia, is systematic, well-organized and on-going.”Smuggling through the often-porous borders in India’s Assam State, Myanmar, southern China and Vietnam is comparatively simple. According to a report by the IUCN Species Survival Commission African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups and TRAFFIC, in recent years most rhino horns from Assam moved first to Myanmar and then on to China.This means that while rhino range states like South Africa or India can make huge efforts to stop poachers, they do not have the power to cut off demand because it comes from outside their borders. To counter this, conservationists from around the world are developing tailor-made strategies to stem East Asia’s hunger for rhino horn.Black rhino mom and calf at a waterhole in Etosha National Park, Namibia. Photo credit: Yathin S Krishnappa, Creative CommonsRhino horn uses and markets“You’ll never succeed in reducing the poaching if you can’t reduce the demand for the [wildlife] products because there’s never enough resources to protect the animals on the ground, and if you don’t reduce the demand the prices go up and up,” said Peter Knights, executive director of WildAid. “Just like the drugs trade, we believe that if there is a very strong demand you’ll never enforce your way out of this problem.”Rhino horn is primarily made of keratin, a protein also found in human nails and hairs. It has little if any medicinal properties, but has been used for centuries in Chinese traditional medicine to treat conditions such as fever, rheumatism and even food poisoning. In Vietnam, it has recently found used as a supposed hangover cure.“[Y]ou also have to look at the different consumers: whether they are consuming for investment, whether they are consuming to give it as a gift, if they are consuming to actually drink the rhino horn themselves — and therefore it might be different what rhino horn they prefer,” said Susie Offord, deputy director of Save the Rhino.Noting that this is a complex issue, Natural Resources Defense Council’s Alex Kennaugh conducted a survey of wildlife consumption in five Chinese cities: Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Kunming, and Harbin. She measured consumer behavior including preferences, willingness to pay and stigma. She found that today in China there are two distinct markets for rhino horn: medicine and luxury goods.The use of rhino horn as a medicine in China dates back to the second century BC. Kennaugh found that although rhino horn-based medicines are not officially included in the modern Chinese pharmacopeia, nearly half of the participants in the study said they knew horn was still used in traditional medicines, mostly for fever. The study also found that the overwhelming majority of those who are aware of low-cost alternatives to rhino horn — such as Chinese herbal remedies — believe that these are more or equally effective.As a result, the study recommends emphasizing the availability of alternative remedies for treating fever and other acute conditions. Such a campaign, the author suggests, should start with women because they represent the majority of buyers of traditional medicine.This study also highlights that people who buy rhino horn as a luxury good do so because they want something “rare” or “unique.” In this market, Asian rhino horn is a particular object of desire. “When asked to differentiate between African and Asian rhino horn at a higher price, the most popular reasons for buying Asian rhino was that it was even rarer than African (31.6 percent) and was of better quality (26.3 percent),” says the study.However, Kennaugh found that awareness of conservation issues and the illegal status of rhino horn dampen its demand in both the medical and luxury market. The report emphasizes that promoting wildlife conservation and substitute luxury goods could diminish “the qualities of desirableness and rarity,” and eventually counter the psychology of buying rhino horn as a luxury good.A poster from the Chi campaign, aimed at reducing demand for rhino horn among Vietnamese businessmen, a key consumer demographic. Image courtesy of Save the Rhino International.The Chi campaign.Save the Rhino’s Susie Offord believes informing people and raising their awareness is crucial, but only a very initial step in a behavior-change or education campaign. Demand reduction, she explained, also includes law enforcement. “What we actually need in conservation is toolkits of all these different activities,” she said.Offord said consumption of rhino horn is being driven by a very small but very influential group of people, so raising awareness and support for wildlife conservation among the general public is important, but it isn’t enough. To really change a behavior, she said, a campaign must target a precise group, and include a positive message because positive messaging has been proven to be more effective in changing behaviors.An example of this approach is the Chi campaign. Launched in September 2014 in Vietnam by TRAFFIC, Save the Rhino and other partners, it focuses on the Vietnamese concept that a person’s inner strength or “Chi” comes from within, and cannot be gained from an external source such as rhino horn.The campaign is focused on the business community because market research of horn consumers identified the key user group as wealthy middle-aged businessmen, keen to show off their new-found wealth. This market research, explained TRAFFIC’s Richard Thomas, taught conservationists critical lessons: don’t use images of rhinos, don’t brand with a conservation organization’s logo, and don’t have spokespeople your target audience won’t listen to.Outreach has been through “champions” – successful Vietnamese businessmen – and it’s been rolled out in collaboration with businesses and the government.Outdoor billboards have been used in Vietnam’s biggest cities. One of them shows businesspeople together with the message “A successful businessman relies on his will and strength of mind. Success comes from opportunities you create, not from a piece of horn.” Another states that “masculinity comes from within.”The campaign’s message has also been put in airport business lounge envelopes, in popular magazines, at golf and tennis clubs, and was included in a Corporate Social Responsibility guide for businesses dealing with wildlife consumption. This campaign also includes an online forum for discussing and learning about Chi, and networking and lifestyle events such as a Chi-themed bike ride that was joined by over 100 business leaders.Results from the Chi Campaign have not been measured yet, but quantitative and qualitative results will be shared in the coming months and years. Still, Offord believes this campaign will be successful in promoting the idea that having rhino horn is something people should be ashamed rather than proud of.A WildAid billboard in the Shenzhen Airport, featuring Chinese celebrities Chen Kun, Jing Boran and Li Bingbing. The “Nail Biter” campaign emphasized that consuming rhino horn is no more effective than chewing one’s own fingernails. Photo courtesy of WildAid.“When the buying stops, the killing can too”WildAid also focuses on demand reduction and public awareness in consuming countries for wildlife products. This is because it regards the consumption of wildlife products as an economic phenomenon associated with new affluence: in the case of rhino horn, poaching crises tend to coincide with rapid increases in income. For example, during the Saudi oil boom in the 1970s and ’80s, the market for rhino-horn dagger handles in Yemen went up considerably as new money flooded into that country. Similarly, rhino horn consumption in Taiwan increased in the 1970s and ’80s as its economy skyrocketed.Rather than trying to change the mind of the consumer, WildAid focuses on changing the society in which wildlife products are consumed.“I don’t believe you can necessarily directly influence through advertising an average-in-education 60-year-old man in Vietnam that thinks rhino horn cures cancer,” explained executive director Peter Knights. “However, you can potentially educate his children, his grandchildren, his neighbors and the people around him who could pressure him on not to consume any longer.”Over the past years, WildAid put a lot of effort into reducing rhino horn demand in China and Vietnam. Its Nail Biter campaign, developed in partnership with the African Wildlife Foundation, focuses on the fact that rhino horn is no more effective than biting one’s own fingernails. Its ambassadors include celebrities such as Sir Richard Branson, actress Li Bingbing, actor Chen Kun, actor and singer Jing Boran and others in China, and 26 other celebrities in Vietnam.To spread its message, WildAid uses public service announcements, billboards placed in subways, shopping centers, pedestrian walkways and outdoor screens. It also launched a social media campaign that had over 12 million views on Weibo, a Chinese hybrid between Twitter and Facebook, and over 1.5 million views on other social media platforms.Anti-ivory billboards line the walkway of the Wangfujing subway station in Beijing. Photo courtesy of WildAid.Knights credits the campaign’s high production values —their material looks like professional corporate campaigns — with garnering $286 million dollars’ worth of free media space in 2016 alone.“It’s kind of a model that works: everybody gets something and nobody pays money, if that makes sense,” said Knights. “The stars get positive exposure as they look good in our pieces (…) and they are supporting a good cause. The television networks get quality productions of beautiful imagery featuring celebrities for free. And we get our message out.”WildAid is also engaging Vietnam’s Buddhist community and younger generations through online comedic videos, and is producing two documentaries, one for the Chinese and one for the Vietnamese market.“In both Vietnam and China we’ve been amazed by the list of people who have signed up to join and also the amount of coverage that the media is giving us, so there is a deep empathy here for this cause, it just needed people having a way of expressing it,” said Knights.Communication campaigns have for decades been seen as crucial to selling products and winning elections. But Knights stresses the fact that demand reduction campaigns become mainstream among conservationists only around 2011. Behavioral change is hard to achieve, and generally involves both personal factors and broader economic and social trends, so it’s difficult to pinpoint the effect of any particular campaign. Still, conservationists are hopeful that well-designed campaigns will prove to be a valuable complement to on-the-ground efforts to save rhinos in Africa and Asia.“Rhino horn used to be used in Japan, used to be used in Taiwan, South Korea … and through a lot of demand reduction work, it has been managed to reduce the demand,” said Susie Offord. “Now we have to make sure the same happens in Vietnam, potentially China and other countries.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

High volumes of ivory continue to be sold online in Japan

first_imgA new report by TRAFFIC has found that thousands of jewelry, seals, scrolls and other items made of elephant ivory continue to be sold online in Japan every week.Over a four-week survey, ivory items worth over JPY 45.2 million ($407,000) were sold across various websites, the team found.The sheer scale of the trade warrants scrutiny to prevent illicit activities, the team says. Thousands of jewelry, seals, scrolls and other items made of elephant ivory continue to be sold online in Japan each week, concludes a new report by TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network.In just four weeks in May and June, 2017, nearly 10,000 ivory items were sold on Yahoo Auction, one of Japan’s largest e-commerce platforms, researchers found. The ivory products included jewelry, hankos (printing seals used to sign documents, contracts, and other paperwork), scrolls, fans, chopsticks, teaspoons and musical instruments. About 22 polished and carved elephant tusks were also advertised and sold during the survey period.These four-week transactions amount to over JPY 45.2 million ($407,000), the report says.Hundreds of ivory products were also advertised on other popular e-commerce websites like Mercari, Rakuten-Ichiba, Rakuma and Yahoo Shopping. An average of 143 new advertisements for ivory products were uploaded every week on Mercari, for example, which is Japan’s leading online CtoC (Customer to Customer) market.“While online ivory sales remain legal in Japan, the sheer scale of the trade warrants scrutiny to prevent illicit activities,” the authors write.Japan was the world’s biggest importer of ivory in the late 1980s. Photo by Udayan Dasgupta.In the 1980s, Japan was the world’s biggest ivory importer. Even after the global trade in elephant ivory was banned by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) in 1989, Japan was allowed to legally import several tons of ivory twice: once in 1999 and then in 2008.However, recent reports by the Environmental Investigation Agency, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., have revealed that loopholes and weak legislations have prevented Japan from keeping illegal ivory out of its legal domestic ivory trade.“The proof of legality at the product level is delegated to a voluntary certification scheme for new products, and regulation over trade in any ivory items other than whole tusks is non-existent,” the TRAFFIC team writes. “These grey areas in Japan’s domestic ivory trade must be addressed accordingly to eliminate potential loopholes for illegal ivory flows.”In June 2017, the Japanese government updated its Law for the Conservation of the Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (LCES). It increased penalties for non-compliance and mandated ivory businesses to register all whole tusks in their possession, according to the report.The updated regulations and improved monitoring by e-commerce companies might have resulted in improved compliance, the TRAFFIC team found. In 2017, about 88 percent of sellers on Yahoo Auction and 85 percent on Rakuten-Ichiba displayed compulsory business notification numbers. In a previous study conducted by TRAFFIC in 2014, only 11 percent of sellers on Yahoo Auction and 22 percent on Rakuten-Ichiba had displayed their numbers.However, all other domestic ivory trade remains weakly regulated. And the lack of regulation for ivory products other than whole tusks is making it difficult to identify and prevent illegal ivory trade, the authors write. On Mercari, for example, a few advertisements for ivory jewelry explicitly claimed that the products had come from Asia and Africa, making their sales illegal under CITES regulations. But the products’ domestic sale in Japan remains legal under the LCES, the authors write, because Japanese law allows ivory products — except whole tusks — to be traded without any requirement for proof of legality.These loopholes make it nearly impossible to confirm the origin of ivory products: whether they are legal items of pre-CITES origin or illegally obtained ones, the researchers say. The sellers, unidentified businesses and individuals who trade in auctions and on the CtoC market sites also currently remain outside the regulatory radar.“TRAFFIC’s findings highlight the need for the Japanese government to scrutinize all online ivory trade and to ensure effective enforcement of the strengthened ivory business regulations introduced through recent LCES amendments,” Tomomi Kitade, Programme Officer for TRAFFIC in Japan, said in a statement. “An urgent overhaul of Japan’s ivory market oversight and regulation is needed to ensure it does not undermine the global fight against illegal ivory trade.”In July this year, Rakuten-Ichiba — previously named the world’s biggest online retailer of ivory — announced that it was banning ivory sale on its website. Sellers were given a one-month grace period for the withdrawal of ivory products that were already on sale.Examples of ivory jewellery offered on Mercari (from left to right: “bought four years ago with a necklace in Thailand”, “bought several years ago in Thailand”, “My uncle went to Congo in Africa with work and brought back as a souvenir….received five years ago”). Image courtesy of TRAFFIC.Banner image of African elephant by Rhett A. Butler.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow Shreya Dasgupta on Twitter: @ShreyaDasgupta Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Forests, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Mammals, Poaching, Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

‘Ecological disaster’: controversial bridge puts East Kalimantan’s green commitment to the test

first_imgWork is currently underway on a bridge and access road that will connect the fast-growing city of Balikpapan with its rural outskirts.The project is part of a broader government program to transform Indonesian Borneo into an economic powerhouse.Conservationists have opposed the project since it was launched in 2008, fearing it will disrupt marine life, cut a crucial wildlife corridor and spark land speculation and encroachment along a protected forest. BALIKPAPAN, Indonesia — Truck driver Bayu Santoso is one of thousands of people expected to take advantage of a planned bridge connecting the fast-growing city of Balikpapan to its rural outskirts.Transporting goods from Sepaku — a remote area in East Kalimantan Province’s North Penajam Paser district — to Balikpapan, Santoso currently relies on a ferry service that takes around 90 minutes to cross Balikpapan Bay. The 800,000 rupiah (about $60) return ticket means he can only afford one trip per day.“The ferry ticket is so expensive that it’s such a burden for us,” he told Mongabay. After gas and other expenses, he usually brings home around 100,000 rupiah per day.Truck driver Bayu Santoso shows a return ticket for the ‘expensive’ ferry service in front of his vehicle. Local officials say the lack of a bridge crossing Balikpapan Bay is holding back regional development. Photo by Basten Gokkon/Mongabay.Such connectivity problems are common in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo. While the island is world famous for its lush and biodiverse rainforests, the government hopes to transform the area into an economic powerhouse. The “Kalimantan Economic Corridor,” focused on developing the island’s extractive industries, is one of six priority areas in the central government’s 2011-2025 development master plan.Upgrading the island’s transport infrastructure is a key part of that strategy, and the planned bridge — known as Pulau Balang for the isle that anchors its center — fits right in.However, the project has drawn protests from conservationists and some locals due to its expected environmental impact. Since the project kicked off in 2008, conservationists have pointed to an alternative route they believe would solve connectivity problems while reducing environmental impacts — but work is already underway, based on the original plans.Ongoing construction of the bridge and its access road has already disrupted marine life in part of the bay and cleared strip of forest on the Balikpapan side that served as a vital connection between mangrove and forest habitats. Still, the local government has vowed work will continue, while promising that environmental damages will be kept to a minimum. The project, they say, could be an exemplar of green infrastructure in Indonesia.The Pulau Balang bridge and its access road (inset area) pass through or near some of the few remaining tracts of primary forest near Balikpapan city. Magenta shading shows tree cover loss, although in some cases that indicates logging in plantations rather than in primary forests. Source: Hansen/UMD/Google/USGS/NASA, accessed through Global Forest Watch.Satellite imagery from Planet Labs shows the progression of bridge- and road work around Balang Island. In the more recent images, the first span of the bridge can be seen crossing from North Penajam Pasar in the west to Balang Island, while forest cleared for the bridge and access road is visible on the eastern side of the bay.‘It’s killing us’The proposed bridge consists of two spans, connected by Balang Island, which sits near the northern tip of Balikpapan Bay. The shorter traverse, which stretches 470 meters (1,542 feet) to link North Penajam Paser and the isle, was completed in 2013 and cost the provincial budget 425 billion rupiah.Lack of funding, however, put the project on hold for two years. In 2015, the central government of President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo took over the completion of the bridge as part of his ambitious plan to develop infrastructure outside of the crowded Java Island.State-owned contractors PT Hutama Karya and PT Adhi Karya, and local builder PT Bangun Cipta Kontraktor were appointed to develop the final span (804 meters) to Balikpapan and its supporting infrastructure.While the benefits of the bridge are still on paper, its development has already caused significant environmental damages to the surrounding land and marine ecosystems.“Balikpapan is one of the most biodiverse cities in Asia. It hosts the last remaining coastal primary rainforest in the region still connected with adjacent marine ecosystems such as special mangroves, seagrass beds and coral reefs,” said Stanislav Lhota, a primatologist at the Czech University of Life Sciences, who has done years of research on the rainforest in East Kalimantan.Tall, dense mangrove trees on the shore of Balang Island. Photo by Basten Gokkon/Mongabay.A variety of mangrove trees standing at over 20 meters tall stretches along the northern coasts of the Balikpapan Bay and around Balang island — a view that gives a stark contrast to most of the southern edge of the bay, which is crowded by settlements and industrial complexes.The playful calls of the Endangered proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) can be heard instead of the ear-assaulting racket of machines and engines. Some 1,400 individuals of the species are estimated to flock the mangroves of the Balikpapan Bay.But the development of the bridge has already seen swaths of the mangrove ecosystem replaced by concrete pillars and a 50-meter wide road. This, scientists fear, will create dangers and difficulties for monkeys as they move around looking for food.The coral-rich waters around Balang Island are the core habitat of the Vulnerable Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris), according to the marine conservation group Rare Aquatic Species of Indonesia (RASI) Foundation.The loss of mangroves and coral reefs due to the bridge development have also jeopardized the local small-scale fishing community, who say “economical fish” are no longer found swarming the bay or the rivers.“The bridge development was another blow to us traditional fishermen on the coast of Balikpapan Bay who, for the last several years, have been affected by the development of industrial zones,” 49-year-old Darman, who like many Indonesians have only one name, told Mongabay earlier this month.The ongoing development of the 5,130-hectare Kariangau Industrial Zone (KIK) has since 2007 been blamed by conservation groups for degrading the quality of Balikpapan Bay and threatening the Sungai Wain Protection Forest, home to scores of the Vulnerable sun bear (Helarctos malayanus), which is the mascot of Balikpapan.A sun bear, the icon of Balikpapan. Scores make their home in the Sungai Wain Protection Forest, which lies just west of the access road for the bridge. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Darman, who lives in the fishing village Gersik in North Penajam Paser, said his parents and grandparents, who were all full-time fishermen with wooden boats, could afford the Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca, known as hajj. He, meanwhile, only catches enough fish to meet his family’s basic needs.“The local government keeps saying that this infrastructure will improve the economy of people living on the coast, but what I’ve experienced so far is the complete opposite — it’s killing us,” he said.The privately-owned factories mushrooming on the coast create some job opportunities, Darman said, but not enough to take on all of the fishermen who will need to find new livelihoods if fish stocks continue to decline. Companies also often end up hiring outsiders who have better education and the required skills, he added.“They promised us new jobs, but what we’ve all been doing all of our lives is fishing, and now our only source of life is being destroyed,” he said.Even truck driver Santoso said he couldn’t be completely positive about the upcoming bridge until he experiences it himself.“Maybe I won’t be spending as much as by going with ferry. However, I personally don’t see this project as highly beneficial for independent truck drivers as much as it will be for the companies. It’s just a way to expand the city,” said Santoso, noting that the route to the bridge, which sweeps in an arc north of the city would be a challenge in itself.last_img read more

Forced out or killed: rare chimps go missing from Cameroon mountain forest

first_imgAgriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Chimpanzees, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Farming, Featured, Forests, Great Apes, Green, Hunting, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Culture, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Over-hunting, Poachers, Poaching, Primates, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation The Endangered Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ellioti) is the least numerous subspecies of chimpanzee, with a total population almost certainly less than 9,000, and probably less than 6,000 individuals.The estimated population is far smaller in Cameroon, where just four known populations number some 250 individuals, all located in the Northwest region.One of those groups, known as “The Great Apes of Tubah” was until recently found in the unprotected Kejom-Keku Mountain Forest.But the chimps haven’t been seen in three years, and conservationists fear they’ve been killed or forced to move on. A new road into the Kejom-Keku area has resulted in the loss of half its forest, as herders, farmers, loggers and poachers move in. The new “farm-to-market” road commissioned by the Cameroon Agriculture Ministry is largely blamed for the massive deforestation occurring on Kendjom-Keku Mountain in the Northwest region of Cameroon. Photo by Eugene N. NforngwaBAMENDA, Cameroon – A group of rare chimpanzees have gone missing from a mountain forest in Northwest Cameroon, say researchers, raising fears concerning their welfare as the animals are exposed to major deforestation and to poachers and loggers largely due to the construction of a widely criticized government-sponsored road project.The small group of Endangered Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes ellioti) is probably one of just four remaining in Cameroon. The last sign of the animals was seen three years ago in the Kejom-Keku Mountain Forest, where researchers sighted the animals’ low-hanging nests and a trail of dung, which led them to estimate the group’s size at approximately six individuals. Pan t. ellioti occupies the smallest geographic range and has the smallest population of all the chimpanzee subspeciesScientists still don’t know much about the missing chimps. A camera trap caught the first and last glimpse of the great apes, amongst the world’s rarest and least studied, in 2014. Since then, existing nests have aged away. The small group nicknamed “The Great Apes of Tubah” appears to have vanished.“They have either been killed or forced to migrate,” speculates conservationist Martin Mikeš. He runs the Kedjom-Keku Organization, an NGO that has been informally monitoring the animals for more than five years. “No one knows what has happened to them,” he says.Mikeš’ worst fear is that the rare animals have been driven locally extinct, like the elephants and buffalo that once inhabited the forest. In the three years since the primates went missing, he says, more than half of the remaining forest, forming parts of the Bamenda Highlands, has disappeared.A new road built principally to encourage agricultural expansion has accelerated habitat loss and given poachers and timber exploiters access to the higher mountain altitudes and to more remote woodlands, says Mikeš. If there is no action, in another five years, he warns, there could be no forest left in the area.The road leading deep into the Kedjom Keku Moutain Forest in Northwest Cameroon opened the region to cattle herders, farmers, loggers and poachers and has resulted in significant habitat loss. Photo by Eugene N. NforngwaRarest, most endangered and least studied chimpsPan troglodytes ellioti is perhaps the rarest of all subspecies of chimpanzee and one of the least studied, according to Osiris Doumbé, a wildlife biologist, conservationist and lecturer at the Bristol Zoological Society. Populations are confined to lowland and montane forests running from western Cameroon into southeastern Nigeria.According to the International Union for Nature and Conservation (IUCN), they are the “least numerous subspecies of chimpanzee with a total population that is almost certainly less than 9,000 individuals and probably less than 6,000 individuals remaining.”The estimated population is far smaller in Cameroon. The country hosts just four known populations of Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees, some 250 individuals, all located in the Northwest region. The subspecies has been locally extinct in the Kimbi Wildlife Reserve and the Kilum-Ijim forests since the late 1980s, says Doumbé. He surveyed the Kedjom-Keku forest in 2013 and was the principal investigator of the Ellioti Project in 2014 and 2015, which mapped the relative distribution of Pan t. ellioti in Cameroon.“Amongst the total four populations of chimpanzees [in Cameroon], the most threatened is no doubt the Kedjom-Keku community with an estimate of less than eight individuals in 2013, which is isolated from other chimpanzee populations,” says Doumbé.The Pan t. ellioti population of Kedjom-Keku and elsewhere in Cameroon is threatened by a combination of habitat loss due to agricultural expansion and logging, as well as hunting. Climate change is also increasingly viewed as a factor for population decline according to researcher Paul Sesink Clee, with the Department of Biological Sciences, New York State University at Albany,“The Northwest is well-known for its agriculture and plantations, but much less for its wildlife which has greatly decreased in the last century, and several large mammals have been extirpated [such as] elephants, leopards and lions,” explains Doumbé.“The Cross-River gorillas are now restricted to Kagwene Gorilla Sanctuary, and the chimpanzees are gathered in isolated communities. [Threats include] hunting pressure, mostly close to the international border with Nigeria.“Despite the chimpanzees [being] integrally protected in Cameroon, some hunters kill our closest relatives to sell the skin and the skulls to the Nigerian markets. This pressure has been increasing, especially on the population of Mbembe Forest where it is now difficult to find chimpanzees,” he says. “Hunting is not so much of a problem for the chimpanzees of Kedjom-Keku, where habitat destruction is definitely the main issue they are facing.”Croplands and pastures have increased dramatically over the past few years, leaving the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees with less and less habitat. Photo By Eugene N. Nforngwa“Scrambling for a share of the forest”At more than 2,000 meters (6,562 feet) above sea level, the Kedjom-Keku Mountain Forest is often shrouded in mist. A freshly built road cuts through that forest – a brick-red snake weaving through lush forest, passing cold pristine streams, mountain pastures as green as golf course fairways, along with newly opened croplands that grow Irish potatoes, corn and vegetables.For centuries, dense forest, rugged terrain and a cold wet climate made the forest inaccessible, helping protect its wildlife. The mountain’s Fulani pastoralists and indigenous hunter-gatherers barely made a visible impression on the natural landscape.But, steadily, as the population grew in the villages bordering and within the mountainous terrain, demand for arable land increased and human encroachment expanded. Slash and burn agriculture drove deforestation, habitat loss and the destruction of watersheds. In the search for more grazing fields, herders began cutting and setting forests on fire, transforming swaths of woodland into grasslands more suitable for their cattle, according to local inhabitants and conservation workers.“[In the past] there was a clear demarcation between grazing land, farms and forests,” says Kemie Christopher, a community volunteer working with the Kedjom-Keku Organization. As a child, he accompanied his father into the forest to hunt antelope. As an adult, he says he can’t remember the last time he saw one alive.The landscape has changed profoundly. “Today, you cannot tell the difference between grazing fields, forest and farms,” Christopher says. “Everyone is scrambling for a share of the forest.”Locals say that over time the mountain’s animals diminished then disappeared, hunted or driven out by habitat loss. In the local community, a handful of trophies – skulls, horns and skins – are the only evidence today of the forest’s former wildlife wealth.Untrained, unpaid and largely unarmed volunteer rangers are no match against land grabbers who are clear cutting the Kedjom-Keku Mountain Forest at a rapid rate. Photo by Eugene N. NforngwaThe coming of the roadThe most rapid change arrived with a new road. In 2015, Cameroon’s Ministry of Agriculture backed a project to construct the so-called “farm-to-market road.”It was packaged as a poverty fighting initiative, a way of expanding opportunities for mountain and forest dwellers. The road is one of the ministry’s Grassfield Participatory and Decentralized Rural Development projects (GP-DERUDEP), a program that receives funding from the Africa Development Bank and the World Bank.In the months following the road’s completion, hundreds of outsiders – farmers, poachers and timber exploiters – moved into the forest. Rich city dwellers, including prominent lawyers and businessmen, bought swaths of trees, most now leveled to grow maize and vegetables.Thanks to the new road, farmers can now drive or ride deeper into the forest, bringing in more labor and high impact clearing equipment including chainsaws and bulldozers. The use of agricultural chemicals has gone up too, polluting rivers and groundwater, says Mikeš.“Villagers are cutting down forests and selling the clearings as farms every day,” says Henry Gweji, a volunteer ranger who works with the regional forestry and wildlife authority. “It is easier to sell land that has already been cleared.”Agricultural production is way up in the region. The Tubah Administrative District, in which the Kejom-Keku Mountain Forest is located, is now a leading producer of huckleberries, a local staple and highly prized in the big cities because of its high fiber, low water content, dark-green color and unique bittersweet taste.The government-run Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (abbreviated IRAD in French) has now opened many hectares of potato experimental farms deep in the forest and plans to introduce new crop varieties on the mountain. Corn and vegetables produced here now sell as far away as Gabon and Equatorial Guinea.But as agricultural productivity has soared, habitat has vanished and wildlife has been devastated, says Mikeš.“It is not a farm-to-market road,” he says. “It is not a sustainable way of promoting agriculture. This place is fertile because of the forest. But all of it is going down.”Slash and burn techniques are used to clear forest in order to convert land for grazing or crops. Photo by Martik Mikes / Kedjom-Keku OrganizationNo man’s land?The Kedjom-Keku Mountain Forest was never protected by the government, despite its rich biodiversity and its hosting of an extremely rare subspecies of chimp. For that reason, efforts to conserve the forest and its wildlife have been at best marginal, led mostly by individuals like Mikeš and by lone NGOs or researchers.What conservation work that is getting done lacks the support of local authorities, who often appear to be benefitting financially from the land grab unfolding in the forest. Municipal and administrative officials turn a blind eye to the massive deforestation taking place and sometimes sanction large farm deals, according to volunteer rangers.Traditional authorities, once custodians of the forest, have become either complacent or helpless. Over time, inhabitants of surrounding villages have made incursions into forested areas, clearing land for crops or cattle, and then claiming it as either part of their ancestral heritage or as “no man’s land,” where occupation is based on a first-come, first-served basis.As a result, land conflicts and violence are on the rise. Mikeš says the biggest problem in the remaining forest is the absence of law enforcement. Though the forest has not been formally conserved, laws that could limit deforestation are not being enforced, including the banning of bush fires and the clearing of waterways and catchments.Vested interests – including wealthy individuals, the political elite and tribal groups – have rendered forest protection and wildlife conservation risky. Twice in the past year, gangs of thugs set fire to Mikeš’ forest camp, hoping to force him out. Rangers say they have been attacked during patrols and are now forced to carry machetes and other rudimentary weapons to protect themselves.Burned and cleared, a plot stands ready for cultivation in the heart of the Kedjom-Keku Mountain Forest. Photo by Martin Mikes / Kedjom-Keku OrganizationConservation, before it’s too lateDespite the dangers and a lack of government support, the few conservationists working in Kejom-Keku Mountain Forest are determined to preserve the remaining forest and wildlife.Doumbé emphasizes the need to find the missing chimpanzee group, if it still survives, and to preserve the great apes along with their habitat. “Chimpanzees are what we call a keystone species,” he says. “Their role in the tropical forest is crucial as they disperse the fruits of dozens of tree species and participate in the regeneration of the forest. Without them, many species of trees would struggle to disperse their seeds and would eventually disappear.“Also, chimpanzees have always been a part of the traditions of people living around them. They represent the wisdom and the cleverness in many traditional tales,” he says.Protecting the chimps is also important for science, adds Doumbé.“The Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee (also called Elliot’s chimpanzee) is – as it names reveals – only found in Nigeria and Cameroon. It is the least known and rarest of all four subspecies of chimpanzee. Therefore, there is still so much to learn from this taxon.“For example, in 2006, a chimpanzee from Ebo forest [in Cameroon’s Littoral Region] was seen cracking nuts with a rock, a behavior only observed previously in the Western chimpanzees of Ivory Coast and the Republic of Guinea. This discovery highlighted the existence of real cultures in chimpanzee populations,” Doumbé explains. “Studying the differences between these cultures is key to not only understanding better how chimpanzee cultures evolve but also to understand how our human cultures have changed and differentiated through evolution.”Doumbé’s hope may be forlorn: the massive deforestation taking place in the unprotected Kejom-Keku Mountain Forest, if not stopped, could mean that the missing Great Apes of Tubah, should they be found, may not have a forest to come home to.An aerial view showing a landscape what was once remote hillside forest, transformed into farmland. Photo by Martik Mikes / Kedjom-Keku OrganizationCitations:Doumbé OA. (2013), Habitat Mapping of the Babanki-Finge Forest, and Survey on the Rarest Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ellioti) in the Bamenda Highlands, North-West Cameroon. MRes Thesis: University of Roehampton, London, UK.Oates, J.F., Doumbé, O., Dunn, A., Gonder, M.K., Ikemeh, R., Imong, I., Morgan, B.J., Ogunjemite, B. & Sommer, V. (2016). Pan troglodytes ssp. ellioti. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T40014A17990330.Sesink Clee et al. (2015) Chimpanzee population structure in Cameroon and Nigeria is associated with habitat variation that may be lost under climate change. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2015 15:2FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Researcher Paul Sesink Clee: “The Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee is perhaps the least studied of all chimpanzee subspecies.” In our study, “[w]e were surprised to see that the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzees living in the savanna-woodland habitat of central Cameroon are under the most immediate threat of climate change, and may completely lose their habitCongat within our lifetime.” Photo courtesy of Planetsave.com Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Sumatra’s ‘tiger descendants’ cling to their customs as coal mines encroach

first_imgArticle published by Basten Gokkon Sekalak village in southern Sumatra lies in one of the last remaining strongholds of the Sumatran tiger, a critically endangered species that the locals revere as both an ancestral spirit and the guardian of the forest.This respect for the tiger has sustained a generations-long pledge to protect the local environment, including the wildlife and water resources.However, the presence of a coal-mining operation in the area poses a threat to both the tigers and the villagers’ way of life: the mining road gives poachers greater access to once-secluded tiger habitat, and the mining waste is polluting the river on which the villagers depend. SEKALAK, Indonesia — The inhabitants of Sekalak village, in this forested region of southern Sumatra, have for generations passed down the legend of Puyang Baju Lantung, a man who was said to have transformed into a tiger to serve as the community’s guardian.The myth goes that Puyang, who lost a toe on his left foot while setting a fish trap known as a kalak (from which the village gets its name), had set himself the Sisyphean task of filling a pitcher with the eyes of a type of white fish that lived upriver. But try as he might, the eyes in the bottom of the pitcher would rot by the time he came close to filling it up, and he had to start all over again, resting only occasionally in a cave. When, years later, his son set out to seek the father he had never known, he found instead a tiger — one that was missing a toe from its left hind paw.“Puyang transformed into a tiger to protect the river and its fish,” says Matsun, a village elder who, like many Indonesians, goes by one name.The people of Sekalak village in southern Sumatra believe that this cave is the resting place of mythical ancestor Puyang Baju Lantung, who was said to have transformed into a Sumatran tiger. The site today is littered with mining waste from a nearby coal pit. Photo by Dedek Hendry/Mongabay-Indonesia.To this day, the villagers revere the Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae) that prowl the forest. Far from being seen as a threat, even when they encroach onto farmland or enter the village itself, the animals are a constant reminder for the people of Sekalak to protect the environment and the natural resources on which they depend.“We don’t get scared,” village chief Sudarmono says of the relationship with the tigers. “They don’t come to attack, but to check on their [human] descendants.”He says there have never been any reported tiger attacks or other conflicts between the villagers of Sekalak and the big cats, which usually show up before the harvest season, around the beginning of the year.Mining siteSekalak lies within the Bukit Balai Rejang Selatan region of Bengkulu province, one of six areas identified by wildlife NGOs as a tiger conservation landscape — a region that meets a minimum habitat size, where tigers have been confirmed to occur in the past 10 years and are not locally extinct.The problem, though, for both the tigers and the Sekalak villagers, is that Bukit Balai Rejang Selatan has been designated by local authorities a limited production forest, which means it is open to commercial exploitation. And that’s exactly what has happened: Since 2009, a company called PT Bara Indah Lestari (BIL) has operated a 10-square-kilometer (3.9-square-mile) concession for coal mines near Sekalak.Last October, three Sumatran tigers were seen at one of the company’s mining sites.Erni Suyanti Musabine, a wildlife expert with the Sumatran Tiger Conservation Forum, says mining is one of the top threats to the population of the Sumatran tiger, which is listed as “Critically Endangered,” or a step away from extinction, by the IUCN. There are an estimated 30 tigers in Bukit Balai Rejang Selatan, which now face a heightened risk of being hunted, thanks to the mining road that potentially allows poachers access deep into once-secluded tiger habitat, Musabine says.This photo shows the concession area of coal miner PT Bara Indah Lestari (BIL) which operates near Sekalak village, along a number of rivers, and in a landscape known to hold a strong population of the Sumatran tigers. Source: Environmental impact assessment document (AMDAL) of PT Bara Indah Lestari.The mining company has also been criticized for allegedly dumping waste from its six coal mines into the river that the village depends on. (The company was not reachable through any of its listed phone numbers or email addresses.)“The river is damaged because of the coal mine, and the fish stock is being depleted,” says Safri, a Sekalak elder. “The cave where Puyang would rest is now littered with chunks of coal, while the river is muddy from soil and coal sediment.”An independent investigation of the river by the provincial chapter of the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), an NGO, confirmed the villagers’ fears about the pollution stemming from the mining operations.“Our report shows that PT Bara Indah Lestari has most likely abandoned its responsibilities [to mitigate pollution] as laid out in the company’s environmental impact assessments,” says Dede Frastien, Walhi’s campaign manager for the extractives industry.“The Sekalak villagers’ complaint about declining fish stocks is evidence of the river’s deteriorating water quality,” he adds.Dede says his office will submit its findings to the law enforcement unit at the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.“Walhi will also encourage the people of Sekalak to apply for state recognition of their local customs for protecting the river and the Sumatran tiger,” he says, citing a 2017 regulation from the environment ministry that formally acknowledges and protects sustainable practices by local and indigenous communities in the management of natural resources and the environment.A key river in Sekalak village has been polluted by chunks of coal and soil sediment reportedly coming from mining company PT Bara Indah Lestari, which operates nearby. Photo by Dedek Hendry/Mongabay-Indonesia.Authorities in Bengkulu have promised to look into the village’s complaint against the coal company.“We need the village to submit a written report to us so we can check and coordinate with the provincial department of environment and forestry for a follow-up,” says Ahyan Endu, head of the Bengkulu energy office, which oversees the local mining sector.Sudarmono, the village chief, sees a dark allegory in the myth of Puyang Baju Lantung, the proto-villager who, destined to spend eternity on the river, had become the guardian of its white fish and all that they stood for.“If [the pollution] continues, the river will get shallower,” Sudarmono warns. “Then the white fish will disappear.”This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published here on our Indonesian site on Jan. 27, 2018.Banner image: A Sumatran tiger at the Chester zoo in the U.S. Photo courtesy of Steve Wilson/Flickr Creative Commons.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Activism, Animals, Coal, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Activism, Forest People, Habitat Degradation, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Peoples, Land Conflict, Pollution, Rainforest Mining, Resource Conflict, Tigers, Traditional People, Water Pollution, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Corals thrive on remotest islands in the Galápagos

first_imgOur first reef community stop in the Reefscape project was the Galápagos Islands in December 2017.We found that ocean events such as El Niño can wipe out huge areas of reef, yet coral survival and regrowth remain evident.Our direct actions, be the destructive overfishing or constructive protection, have a huge impact on the future of coral reef ecosystems.One size does not fit all when it comes to coral reefs — even an archipelago hammered by coral-killing warm waters can harbor refugia for biodiversity. Adapted from Bing Maps.The Galápagos Islands are not widely known for their coral reefs. Most visitors to the islands’ waters seek big charismatic residents like sharks, manta rays, sea lions and whales, or unique creatures like marine iguanas. Dive shops in the Galápagos almost exclusively advertise the opportunity to see these large creatures, while few mention corals. Yet the archipelago is home to vibrant reefs, and we commenced the global Reefscape project there.Perhaps so little is mentioned about reefs in the Galápagos today because of a history of coral bleaching across the archipelago. The scientific literature reports ocean temperature spikes of up to 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) during the 1982-83 and 1997-98 El Niño events, and again to a much lesser degree in 2015. El Niño’s hot waters pushed many corals beyond their thermal tolerances, resulting in widespread reef-scale bleaching.last_img read more

Bridgestone aims for full sustainability by 2050

first_imgBridgestone is the world’s largest tire and rubber manufacturer.The company joins Pirelli and Michelin in committing itself and its suppliers to a sustainable supply chain by 2050.The move could be particularly beneficial in places like Cambodia, where deforestation has closely tracked the global price for rubber. The world’s largest tire manufacturer has pledged to develop a fully sustainable supply chain by 2050.Bridgestone announced on Feb. 6 an overhauled sustainability policy for its suppliers, which pulls together the Japanese company’s stances on issues related to land use, including deforestation and human rights.“Our goal is to create long-term environmental, social and economic benefits for everybody,” Jim DeMouy, Bridgestone Americas vice president for environment, health, safety and sustainability, said in an interview with the publication Rubber and Plastics News. “It’s a real step forward for the industry and for us.”Deforestation in Laos for an industrial-scale rubber plantation. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The document outlines Bridgestone’s plans for “net-zero deforestation,” which will require suppliers to avoid cutting primary forest; to obtain free, prior and informed consent from local communities; and to “protect and preserve” high-carbon-stock and high-conservation-value spots.Rubber prices closely track deforestation in Cambodia, according to Global Forest Watch. The organization found that as global rubber prices surged, so did tree cover loss.Globally, “[t]here’s a lot at stake,” said Kristin Urquiza, a campaign director with the watchdog NGO Mighty Earth, in a statement.And the rubber industry could have a marked effect on carbon emissions, Urquiza said. “By some estimates, deforestation for rubber between now and 2024 could release the same amount of carbon dioxide as the country of India does annually.”A deer in Cambodia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Mighty Earth said Vietnam, Laos and Myanmar would also benefit from stronger policies aimed at ending deforestation for rubber.As the biggest player in the tire market, Bridgestone had to take a leading role, said CEO Masaaki Tsuya.“We recognize our ability and responsibility to drive change and improvements in the ways that industry interacts with the environment and communities around the world,” Tsuya said in a statement from the company. “We expect our suppliers and partners to work with us in pursuit of sustainable supply chains.”Rival tire producers Pirelli and Michelin have also made sustainability commitments recently. Mighty Earth praised Bridgestone’s move but also called on Goodyear and Continental, two other companies that round out the five biggest tire makers in the world, to make their own commitments.“The entire tire and rubber industries need to defuse this rubber carbon bomb. In order to make sure practices actually change on the ground, there needs to be industry-wide action against deforestation,” Urquiza said in the Might Earth statement. “We look forward to working with relevant stakeholders to adapt the best of these systems to the rubber industry to immediately eliminate deforestation and land grabbing.”A rubber plantation in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Banner image of an otter in Cambodia by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Biodiversity, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Corporate Responsibility, Corporate Role In Conservation, Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporations, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forests, FPIC, Land Rights, Plantations, Rainforests, Reforestation, Rubber, Saving Rainforests, Sustainability, Tropical Forests, Zero Deforestation Commitments Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

New study: Radar reveals bats are a bellwether of climate change

first_imgAdaptation, Adaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Animal Behavior, Animals, Bats, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Food, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystem Services, Environment, Impact Of Climate Change, Insects, Mammals, Migration, Research, Technology, Technology And Conservation, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation New research indicates that bats could signal seasonal shifts due to climate change.The study, published in the journal Global Change Biology, is the first to use radar to track an animal migration.The scientists found that bats that migrate between Mexico and a cave in Texas are now arriving about two weeks earlier than they did in 1995. Scientists know that bats boost the profits of farmers by fertilizing crops and keeping hungry insects in check. According to recent research, they also could clue farmers in to shifting weather patterns due to climate change.“These bats spend every night hard at work for local farmers, consuming over half of their own weight in insects,” Charlotte Wainwright, a co-author of the study published online Feb. 14 by the journal Global Change Biology, said in a statement.In the first study to employ radar to study animal migration, Wainwright and Phillip Stepanian, both meteorologists with the agricultural research institution Rothamsted Research in the U.K., found that Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis Mexicana) now fly north to Texas from Mexico on their annual migration about two weeks earlier than they did a couple of decades ago.Brazilian free-tailed bats in Cartwright Cave in the Bahamas. Photo by Matti Mero [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.The discovery was something of an accident, Stepanian said in the statement. The team was combing through radar measurements for weather surveillance around Bracken Cave near San Antonio, Texas, where millions of Brazilian free-tailed bats roost in the spring, summer and fall. This data, it turns out, is a handy tool for estimating the size of bat populations.“Our initial goal was just to show that the populations could be monitored remotely without disturbing the colony,” Stepanian said. “We weren’t expecting to see anything particularly noteworthy.”But when they looked at the measurements between 1995 and 2017, which tracked the massive exodus of bats from the cave each evening heading out to hunt, a pattern emerged. It showed that the bats now arrive at the cave earlier on average in the spring than they did in 1995 — currently around mid-March each year.Millions of bats roost in Bracken Cave in Texas between the spring and fall. Photo by Phillip Stepanian/Rothamsted Research.They were also able to document a growing proportion of the population sticking around through the winter. Research on Bracken Cave in the 1950s reported that the bats typically cleared out by mid-November each year. But the earliest data in the current study indicated that about 1 percent of the bats had taken to wintering in the southern Texas cave. By 2017, that figure rose to 3.5 percent.“We can’t tell if the overwintering bats are bats that arrived in March and have not returned south, or if they migrated to Bracken Cave from farther north,” Stepanian said.The research validates the use of radar to help keep tabs on bat numbers. And while the study has demonstrated that bats are capable of adapting to changes to their environment, other questions have arisen. It’s not clear how they’ll respond to more extreme climatic changes or whether bats’ malleable behavior will allow them to cope. If they can’t, of course, that’s likely to have an impact on farmers’ yields.What is clear, Stepanian said, is that Bracken Cave’s seasonal bat colony is responding “to some environmental change, and to the presence of insect prey earlier in the year.”Brazilian free-tailed bats near Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Photo by Nick Hristov [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.Banner image of free-tailed bats leaving Bracken Cave by Phillip Stepanian/Rothamsted Research.CITATIONSEads, R. B., Wiseman, J. S., & Menzies, G. C. (1957). Observations concerning the Mexican free-tailed bat, Tadarida mexicana. Texas. Texas Journal of Science, 9(2), 227-242.Federico, P., Hallam, T. G., McCracken, G. F., Purucker, S. T., Grant, W. E., Correa-Sandoval, A. N., … & López, J. D. (2008). Brazilian free‐tailed bats as insect pest regulators in transgenic and conventional cotton crops. Ecological Applications, 18(4), 826-837.Stepanian, P. M., & Wainwright, C. E. (2018). Ongoing changes in migration phenology and winter residency at Bracken Bat Cave. Global Change Biology.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Police to Confiscate Motor Bikes for Violations

first_imgAuthorities of the Liberian National Police (LNP) have vowed to seize motorbikes if the operators violate recent restrictions that banned them from ridding in certain areas described as “No Go Zones.”  According to an LNP release issued yesterday, police will be left with no alternative, but to take   stern actions against motor cycle operators who violate the “No Go Zones” restriction that was imposed by the government on November 6, 2012.The release quoted the Director of Police, Colonel Chris Massaquoi, warning that repeated violation of the restriction by motorcyclists will no longer be tolerated. Col. Massaquoi has called on owners of motorcycles to advise their riders to desist as drastic measures, including the confiscation of their bikes and subsequent prosecution await anyone caught disregarding the regulation.The “No Go Zones” restriction prohibits motorcycle operators from plying the Tubman Boulevard to Central Monrovia, Somalia Drive, and from Bong Mines Bridge to Central Monrovia.”The restriction was imposed as the result of an increase in the wave of motorcycle-related accidents and injuries as well as the facilitation of criminal activities around Monrovia and its environs perceived to be masterminded by some motorcyclists.At the same time, the LNP said the City of Paynesville still remains closed to motorcyclists until the ongoing investigation into the recent incident that resulted in the death of a cyclist and the burning of police detachments in Paynesville is completed.The April 16 incident saw the vandalizing of police zones and depots. Director Massaquoi has instructed the LNP to arrest any violators who challenge the officers while they are enforcing the restriction and send those violators to the Ministry of Justice for prosecution.Col. Massaquoi  called on the general public to remain law abiding and continue to report suspected crimes to the police to ensure the safety of community dwellers.He admonished those politicizing the operations of the LNP to    desist as they remain focus on their law enforcement responsibility.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Police to collaborate with Red Thread to tackle societal ills

first_imgTop officials from the Guyana Police Force on Monday met with representatives of the NGO Red Thread to discuss the preliminary report of a two-year project which commenced in 2016 with focus on “Engaging communities for improving implementation of Domestic Violence laws”.Crime Chief Paul Williams, other top officials of the Guyana Police Force and members of Red ThreadThe meeting was held at the Kingston, Georgetown Headquarters of the Guyana Police Force, and was attended by Crime Chief Assistant Commissioner Paul Williams, Karen De Souza, and top officials of both the Guyana Police Force and Red Thread.Discussions dealt with the preliminary report of the project mentioned above, which targeted Plaisance/Better Hope, La Parfaite Harmonie, Bartica, Lethem and Anna Regina.During the research done in connection with this project, Police stations within the stated communities had been observed in relation to how members of the Force would deal with domestic violence and related matters.From the discussion, both positive and negative behaviours and actions would have been observed by the Red Thread representatives.Officers in attendance pledged to continue working with the group to strengthen their efforts in addressing domestic violence, child abuse, sexual offences and other aspects.last_img read more