UPDATED: Bombers rock Charles Hayes to finish AA Championships on positive note

first_imgBombers back in win column after scoring 4-1 decision over Vancouver’s John Oliver The L.V. Rogers Bombers finally got off the schneid dumping John Oliver of Vancouver 4-1 in consolation round action at the BC High School Boy’s AA Soccer Championships Tuesday in Burnaby.The win was the first of the tournament for the Kootenay High School Champs from Nelson.LVR opened the tournament with two tough losses Monday, 1-0 to W.L. Seaton of Vernon and 2-0 Brentwood College of Mill Bay. Tuesday, the Bombers completed the round robin with a 2-0 setback to Sands High School of Delta.The Bombers conclude the tournament Wednesday with a game against Charles Hayes of Prince Rupert. The L.V. Rogers Bombers concluded the 2016 BC High School Boy’s AA Soccer Championships Wednesday in Burnaby on a positive note Wednesday, pounding Charles Hays of Prince Rupert 6-2 in consolation round action.The result, coupled with a 4-1 decision over John Oliver Tuesday, allows the Bombers to finish in 13th spot in the 16-team field.After failing to score during the round robin, LVR’s offence exploded for 10 goals in two games.last_img read more

Roures: “Soccer losses could reach 7,000 million”

first_imgTalking about dates of the return to competition, according to the moment the pandemic is experiencing, it is still early, but Roures is clear on the idea. “The only viable schedules are those that lead to ending beyond June. This should not be a problem, it is a situation of force majeure. If the contracts do not end, the footballers do not charge. They will be the first interested in ending when it is” , it states. Roures has explained the consequences of not finishing any competition, although he sees it as unlikely. “If any competition does not end, the contract should be renegotiated and the proportionality of what has been played and what should not be applied. But this is the least possible scenario, everyone is interested in the season ending,” he said. Jaume Roures, head of Mediapro, has quantified the losses to which European football is exposed if the coronavirus crisis could not allow the competitions to be concluded. While it is true, he stressed during an interview on RAC1 that all the parties “are interested in ending it. His position as owner of the main television rights in European football allows him to have a clear vision of the risks. “The most important thing is to end the season. It is not so important to know when the next season will start. If this season does not end, 30% of the revenue will be lost, European football would lose more than 7,000 million euros. Football will not you can afford it, “explained Roures.last_img read more

Ethiopia looks to carbon trading as it gears up to be net carbon neutral by 2025

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker Carbon Trading, Forests, Redd, Redd And Communities, Sustainable Forest Management The massive Oromia region constitutes over 34 percent of Ethiopia’s landmass and is home to more than 33 million people.The Oromia program will receive $68 million in various benefits through two World Bank program for the next decade.Ethiopia will use the program to build on existing landscape protection and project approaches to REDD+ as they scale up and finance improved land use across Oromia. ADDIS ABABA – Ethiopia’s work to keep its environmental programs sustainable while local communities benefit from forest preservation is set to get a boost. The country’s most prominent program to mobilize resources toward its net carbon neutral by 2025 goal, the Oromia Forested Landscape Program (OFLP), is scheduled to start this year.Ethiopia’s massive Oromia region constitutes 34.3 percent of the country’s landmass, largely in the southwest, and holds more than a third of the country’s 100 million residents. It also harbors Ethiopia’s largest concentration of biodiversity.The $68 million OFLP project was established through two World Bank funds. One fund is for $18 million and is aimed at the restoration of forests on degraded land. The other is a $50 million fund for a program targeting carbon sequestration assessment and performance enhancement. Under the umbrella of the OFLP, environmentally-friendly businesses and industries in local communities, along with forest tourism, are also slated for development.The OFLP will receive payments of up to $50 million for verified carbon credits against an agreed forest reference emission level from the World Bank for a decade. The forest reference emission level is part of a critical policy framework that gives countries a point to measure the results they have gained from REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries) implementation.An additional $18 million is under a five-year grant agreement focused on developing approaches that enable sustainable land use and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through the BioCarbon Fund for Sustainable Forest Landscapes. The BioCarbon Fund works to combat greenhouse gas emissions that come from the land sector, including deforestation and forest degradation, and in the promotion of relevant land-use policies. The project will monitor and account for forest cover reductions and deforestation, and associated GHG emissions across Oromia by addressing causes of deforestation and degradation.The Oromia region (in red) in Ethiopia covers over 34 percent of Ethiopia’s landmass. Map via Wikimedia Commons/TUBSThe OFLP program is designed to build on existing landscape protection and project approaches to REDD+ in an effort to scale up and finance improved land use across Oromia. REDD+ is a multi-platform program established by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. It provides a way for stakeholders and involved organizations to share experiences, lessons learned, and outcomes in their work, according to the REDD+ platform website. Some key areas the program addresses and monitors include drivers of deforestation, national strategy, safeguards, and capacity building.Ethiopia wants to use projects like the OFLP to implement change while gaining financial benefit. The country’s current forest cover stands at about 11.5 million hectares, according to national estimates and the U.N.’s 2015 Global Forest Resource Assessment under the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). According to the FAO, a comprehensive national inventory of Ethiopia’s forests has only been done once, between 1988-2004. That study assessed all of Ethiopia and classified land use and land cover classes, growing stock, and trends. It remains the primary source of national scale forest statistics, though the African Forest Forum has planned a national-level survey of planted forests. Other available data shows that forest degradation has not slowed. Global Forest Watch numbers show that between 2001-2014, tree cover loss peaked and remained high compared to the first part of the sampling period.According to Yitbetu Moges, Ethiopia’s national representative for REDD+ at Ethiopia’s Ministry of Forestry, Environment and Climate Change (MoFEC), real progress will require intensive collaboration.Mountain Nyala in Bale, Ethiopia. Photo by Rod Waddington via Flickr“Reducing deforestation and improving [the] livelihood of local communities that depend on forest resources will ensure that carbon credit can be sold to the likes of World Bank, Norway and United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC),” Moges said. He added that most of the money will be invested in rural development as part of anti-poverty, pro-forest, rural economy-oriented programs.The OFLP will also look at studies commissioned by the Ethiopian government and World Bank that analyze key items including drivers of deforestation and forest degradation, design of a measurement reporting and verification system, preparation of REDD+ safeguard measures, and analysis of legal and institutional frameworks for Oromia REDD+ Program.Oromia has experience with REDD+ through the Bale Mountains Eco-Region Project (BMERP). Building on a previous program in the area, and known broadly as the Bale Eco-Region project, it covers 500,000 hectares and surrounds the 200,000-hectare Bale National Park, a global biodiversity hotspot. It was the first large-scale REDD+ project in Ethiopia.Ethiopia’s Resilient Green Economy Strategy (CRGE) underpins the country’s goal to become net carbon neutral by 2025. The East African nation aims to accomplish key economic goals while reducing GHG emissions through efforts that include carbon trading. Such an accomplishment would involve the country doubling its forest cover to around 30 percent of its landmass, according to MoFEC.The transition to REDD+ While Ethiopia hopes to see future benefits from the REDD+ program, the country is no stranger to carbon trading. It established the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) under the Kyoto protocol, which requires countries to create carbon sinks by planting trees on degraded land. The 2,700-hectare Humbo CDM carbon project in Ethiopia’s south was envisaged as a carbon sink program through which carbon was quantified and brought to the international market for purchase, with the World Bank as the primary client.According to Zerihun Dejene, environmental program coordinator at local Ethiopian non-profit consortium group PHE (Population, Health, Environment), Ethiopia has failed to make the most of CDM benefits, which allows emission reduction projects in developing countries to sell certified emission reduction (CER) credits. The CERs can be either traded or sold to progress toward emission reduction goals.Bale National Park, Ethiopia. Photo by Indrik Myneur via Wikimedia Commons“CDM projects require approved finance, meaning the need to invest on a certain amount of afforestation project, develop and quantify the amount of carbon on sale but most developing countries can’t invest on that,” Dejene said. He added that it also requires tedious procedure and substantial investment and resources to make marketable carbon credits. Even then, a prospective buyer might reject them.REDD+ representative Moges added that with the price of one ton of carbon having decreased from a high of $30 to less than $1 over the last decade, the lifespan of CDM naturally came to an end. Yet even though CDM was phased out when the historic Paris Agreement on climate change entered into force in November 2016, the Humbo carbon project remains. Registered in 2009 with a 30-year lifespan, it is the only significant carbon finance project currently active in Ethiopia.In contrast to the Kyoto protocol – which puts binding commitments on individual countries – the Paris Agreement sets out voluntary carbon reduction emissions goals by individual nations. The Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (now called NDCs) were sent to U.N. Framework on Climate Change by individual countries instead of being used as legally binding emission targets. NDCs are expected to last from 2020-2030 and 163 countries – including Ethiopia – have set out their strategies. Countries that have formally joined the Paris Agreement have NDCs under the interim registry, which does not yet include Ethiopia.Under the Paris Agreement, countries have cooperative agreements to sell and purchase carbon. NDCs take this one step further.“Based on NDCs we can…determine the result of climate change as a result of this,” PHE’s Dejene said. “For example Ethiopia is planning to reduce its carbon emission by around 60 percent by 2020.”Myriad projectsEthiopia isn’t pinning its green economy hopes solely on a carbon trade strategy, though. It are also using other schemes such as constructing electric trains and other green energy projects. The country has already built Africa’s first electric trans-boundary railway project, the 467-mile Addis Ababa-Djibouti railway, as well as the 20-mile Addis Ababa light rail project.But proponents say the carbon trading projects can’t come soon enough.“At the moment we’re losing five times more forest than we’re planting,” Moges said. “It’s a crisis situation in terms of natural resource management despite all the efforts…by the government and mass mobilization of the community to [implement] reforestation and afforestation projects.”He added that when REDD+ goes operational, revenue earned by carbon trading goes directly to the local community while helping prevent floods and droughts that regularly cause misery in Ethiopia.“If Ethiopia is strategic in protecting its environment, natural resources like abundant water can be sold just as oil,” Moges said. “The difference being the former is renewable, and through this revenue it can power its industrialization, boost tourism, boost electricity generation thereby creating a wealthy green economy.”Banner image: Soda volcano in Oromia region, Ethiopia. Photo by Katy Anis/UNESCOElias Gebrelsellasie is an Ethiopian journalist based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. You can find him on Twitter at @EliasGebreResourceshttp://theredddesk.org/countries/ethiopiahttp://www.worldbank.org/en/news/feature/2012/10/09/ethiopia-climate-project-receives-africa-s-first-forestry-carbon-creditshttp://www.phe-ethiopia.org/https://www.theice.com/ccxFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Leading ivory trade investigator slain in Tanzania

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Anti-poaching, Elephants, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Illegal Trade, Ivory, Ivory Trade, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Poaching, Wildlife One of Africa’s top ivory trade investigators has been shot dead by gunmen in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.Wayne Lotter was the co-founder and President of PAMS Foundation, which set up and supported the elite unit behind more than 2,000 arrests since November 2014.He was killed late on Wednesday, while traveling in a taxi from the airport to his rented flat in the quiet suburb of Masaki. DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania – One of Africa’s top ivory trade investigators has been shot dead by gunmen in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.Wayne Lotter was the co-founder and President of PAMS Foundation, which set up and supported the elite unit behind more than 2,000 arrests since November 2014.He was killed late on Wednesday, while traveling in a taxi from the airport to the quiet suburb of Masaki. He had previously received death threats.On Thursday, the famous conservationist Dr. Jane Goodall said he had been “a hero of mine, and a hero to many,” who was “prepared to carry on no matter what”.She added: “If this cowardly shooting was an attempt to bring the work of the PAMS Foundation to an end, it will fail.”Wayne Lotter, one of Africa’s top ivory trade investigators, has been shot dead by gunmen in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Photo by Krissie Clark/PAMS Foundation.Tanzania lost more than 60 percent of its elephants between 2009 and 2014, according to latest elephant census data. Poaching is fueled by the demand for ivory, primarily from Asian countries, including China.PAMS Foundation estimated that if that trend had continued, there would now be just 15,000 elephants left in the country. Wayne Lotter has been credited with helping to “turn the tide” on poaching in Tanzania, restoring elephant numbers to an estimated 40,000 by introducing an intelligence-led approach to policing ivory trafficking networks.PAMS Foundation funds the National and Transnational Serious Crimes Investigation Unit (NTSCIU), which targets buyers, traders, and trafficking kingpins, as well as those carrying out elephant poaching.The unit was behind the arrest of the Chinese businesswoman Yang Feng Glan, known as the “Ivory Queen,” in October 2015. It was believed to be the world’s biggest-ever ivory trafficking case. Yang is accused of leading a ring that transported 706 elephant tusks worth more than $2.5 million. Her trial is ongoing and she denies the charges.The detective unit was also celebrated in Leonardo Di Caprio’s feature-length Netflix documentary The Ivory Game, which featured the arrest of a notorious Tanzanian poacher, Boniface Matthew Mariango, who was nicknamed “The Devil.” Mariango was sentenced to twelve years in prison earlier in 2017.We lost a true conservation hero who fought so hard to protect Africa’s elephants. https://t.co/aViqCTjScX— Leonardo DiCaprio (@LeoDiCaprio) August 18, 2017Wayne Lotter shied away from media attention and never personally took praise for the unit’s victories.On Thursday, the international campaigning organisation WildAid said that conservation “had lost one of its brightest and best.”The group added: “The tide was starting to turn in Tanzania, elephant poaching had decreased in a number of areas, and this was in no small measure because of PAMS and the extraordinary partnership that it forged with the NTSCIU.”51-year-old Lotter, originally from Johannesburg, South Africa, held a Master’s degree in Conservation and worked in wildlife protection for more than 25 years. He had lived in Tanzania since 2003.His PAMS Foundation co-founder Krissie Clark said: “Wayne devoted his life to Africa’s wildlife and he cared deeply about the people and animals that populated this world. Wayne’s charm, brilliance and eccentric sense of humour gave him the unique ability to make those around him constantly laugh and smile. He died bravely fighting for the cause he was most passionate about.”Close friend Malcolm Ryen said: “It is one of the darkest days in the conservation world. The tragic loss of Wayne Lotter has deeply hit the fight against poaching in Africa. Wayne Lotter, through PAMS Foundation and the cooperation with the government NTSCIU and the WCU initiated a new era in the fight against poaching, with the introduction of a new intelligence-led approach to fight criminal gangs.”Ryen also noted that Lotter’s achievements set a milestone in the war against poachers.“As he used to say, this is a war that has to be fought on different fronts, hitting the infantry, the cavalry as well as the generals, using different approaches to hit different levels, and that has produced unprecedented results. Thanks to him and his team, poaching in Tanzania has been drastically reduced to almost a halt. He has contributed in the saving of thousands of elephants. We will all miss him dearly and hope his team will keep on with the great job carried out until now.”International trading in ivory remains banned under the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), but illegal ivory products still make their way into legal markets.China, the world’s biggest market, has committed to end its legal, domestic trade by the end of 2017, while Hong Kong published a bill to ban its trade by 2021 this past June. The European Union banned exports of raw ivory from July 1st, while the United States announced last year a “near-total ban” on the commercial trade of ivory.Still, around 20,000 to 30,000 elephants are killed across Africa each year.Mary Rice, Executive Director of the Environmental Investigation Agency, called Lotter “one of the last pioneers of conservation” and said his death was a “massive blow to wildlife conservation.”She said the work of PAMS Foundation was widely regarded as one of the most successful models in Africa, and had even forced criminal networks to move out of Tanzania to neighbouring countries, to escape the increased law enforcement and prosecution. She added: “Wayne’s inimitable personality, unique sense of humour, enduring and unstinting commitment and integrity, even in the face of overwhelming hostility and corruption, is a sad loss.”Tanzanian police are investigating the attack on Wayne Lotter. He leaves behind his wife Inga, two daughters, and his parents.Wayne Lotter speaking at a conference. Photo by Krissie Clark/PAMS Foundation.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

As 2017 hurricane season ends, scientists assess tropical forest harm

first_imgAmphibians, Animals, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Birds, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extinction, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Extinction And Climate Change, Extreme Weather, Featured, Frogs, Global Warming, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Herps, Hurricanes, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Rainforest Conservation, Reptiles, Storms, Tropical Deforestation, Turtles, Weather, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation This year’s Atlantic hurricane season – one for the record books – ended on 30 November, seeing six Category 3 to 5 storms wreaking massive destruction across the Caribbean, in the U.S. and Mexico. While damage to the built environment is fairly easy to assess, harm to conserved areas and species is more difficult to determine.Satellite images show extensive damage to the 28,400-acre El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico, the United States’ only national tropical rainforest. However, observers on the ground say the forest is showing signs of a quick recovery.More serious is harm to already stressed, endangered species with small populations. El Yunque’s Critically Endangered Puerto Rican parrot was hard hit: out of 50 endemic wild parrots, 16 are known dead. Likewise, the Endangered imperial parrot endemic to Dominica, spotted just three times since Hurricane Maria.Ecosystems and species need time to recover between storms. If the intensity of hurricanes continues to increase due to escalating global warming as predicted, tropical ecosystem and species resilience may be seriously tested. Puerto Rico’s El Yunque National Forest in 2014, before this year’s hurricanes damaged the forest canopy. Photo by HBarrison on Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC-SAOn September 20th, the 150 mile-per-hour winds of Hurricane Maria barrelled into Puerto Rico, the worst storm to hit the island in recent history. Maria destroyed tens of thousands of homes, and, over two months later, widespread power outages still affect much of the island and hurricane-related deaths continue to rise due to a lack of access to healthcare.A recent satellite analysis shows just how completely Maria changed the natural face of the island. El Yunque National Forest — the United States’ only national tropical rainforest — was altered almost beyond recognition, with leaves lost, branches snapped and trees downed. The transformation from lush green to barren brown is evident in remote images that capture the entire 28,400 acres of the reserve, as well as in high-resolution close-ups of smaller areas where it’s possible to pick out the fine lines of blown-down trees.“The damage to the forest cover is significant and it no longer looks like a rainforest,” said Michelle Eversen, of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Caribbean Ecological Services.As climate change escalates, and the possibility of more extreme weather events increases, the danger to tropical ecosystems from record storms like those seen this year is likely to increase.On Sept. 20, 2017 at 10:50 a.m. EDT NASA’s Terra satellite provided this visible image as Hurricane Maria moved over Puerto Rico. The eye had become obscured by clouds. Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response TeamForest damage and recoveryEl Yunque is one of the United States’ most diverse protected areas, home to hundreds of species of birds, animals and plants, including some found nowhere else. For example, several species of coqui frog (in the genus Eluetherodactylus), the Puerto Rican boa (Epicrates inornatus) and the epiphytic Luquillo Mountain babyboot orchid (Lepanthes eltoroensis) are endemic to the park and island.What does it mean for these species when their habitat is transformed overnight?For some, it’s business as usual. “It is important to remember that hurricanes are a natural part of the cycle here,” said Tana Wood, a research ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service’s International Institute of Tropical Forestry (IITF). This means that species have adapted to respond quickly after major weather disturbances.“All [plant] species grow well after the hurricane, even those whose individuals were decapitated,” said ITTF director Ariel Lugo. “Re-sprouting is a mechanism for bouncing back and maintaining your space in the forest. Seed germination is another mechanism that favors pioneer species growing in open areas. Such species grow at unbelievable rates.”A high-resolution close-up of a section of El Yunque National Forest. After Hurricane Maria struck, it “looked like winter had come to El Yunque,” said research ecologist Tana Wood of the U.S. Forest Service’s International Institute of Tropical Forestry. However, the forest has already started to recover, with a flush of new leaves slowly moving from lower to higher elevations. Imagery source: © 2017 DigitalGlobe. Imagery analysis: MAAP, a project of Amazon Conservation Association“I am totally amazed at how the forest is recovering,” continued Wood. “I drove out to the forest a couple of days after Hurricane Maria and it was completely defoliated with quite a bit of structural damage (i.e. downed trees and branches, trees cut in half and twisted, etc.). It looked like winter had come to El Yunque.”“However, within two weeks of the storm, trees started to put out new leaves, starting with the lowlands and slowly moving up the mountain. It has been fascinating to watch!”Wood said that within a year the canopy would likely begin to close again, as trees start to put out new branches. But how long will it take for the forest to fully recover? “[W]e see the forest as continuously evolving and never returning to past states,” said Lugo, predicting a closed canopy forest would be present in 5-10 years, and a “forest without the pioneer species that regenerated after the hurricane” present in 50 years — assuming no more hurricanes hit in the meantime.Satellite images of El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico, before and after Hurricane Maria caused severe damage to the forest on 20 September 2017. Leaves and branches were stripped from trees, and trees were downed, transforming the lush tropical landscape. Top panel: high-resolution imagery from Planet. Bottom panel: medium-resolution imagery from NASA/USGS. Imagery analysis: MAAP, a project of Amazon Conservation AssociationAt risk species heavily impactedHowever, for embattled El Yunque animals already on the brink, hurricanes like Maria are especially bad news, and the possibility of recovery less sure. By 1975, the area’s endemic Puerto Rican parrot (Amazona vittata) population dropped to just thirteen individuals; since then intensive conservation efforts, including a successful captive breeding programme, have saved the species from extinction, although it is still classified as Critically Endangered by the IUCN. Before this season’s storms, a wild flock of around 50 birds was found in El Yunque’s treetops, with a slightly larger flock also present at another forest site, Rio Abajo.Since Maria, the Puerto Rican Parrot Recovery Team has been trying to establish just how many survived. “[E]vidence collected so far indicates a significant portion of the wild population in El Yunque was lost to the storm,” Eversen said.Only 32 were accounted for after Hurricane Irma, which struck just 3 weeks before Maria; since Maria, 16 have been confirmed dead.The team continues to search for unaccounted parrots, and follow up on reported sightings, Eversen added. She emphasized that there was a lot of uncertainty about how many birds have been lost from El Yunque overall, but “at the current rate of recovery it could easily reach 50 percent” of the wild population. However, as Lugo pointed out, the species has been here before: “[1989 hurricane] Hugo killed a maximum of 47 percent of the parrot population,” and they recovered in the following decades.The captive population, which numbers around 200 parrots, was kept safe during the storms. “The focus now is on repairing the aviary to be ready for the coming breeding season,” Everson said.The Puerto Rican parrot is a Critically Endangered endemic species and the focus of intensive conservation efforts, including a successful captive breeding program. But only 32 of El Yunque’s 50-strong wild flock were accounted for after Hurricane Irma, and 16 birds have been confirmed dead since Maria. The final death toll is still not known, and all efforts are now focused on restoring the aviaries in time for the breeding season. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Flickr, CC BY 2.0Assessing natural damage across the CaribbeanPuerto Rico is just one island, and Maria just one hurricane in an annual Atlantic Hurricane Season, running June 1st to November 30th, that this year saw six hurricanes of Category 3 or above wreak widespread damage across the Caribbean and Gulf Coasts of Mexico and the United States. 2017 is likely to be among the top three most destructive seasons recorded in the region, with one preliminary damage assessment putting U.S. damage alone from just the three biggest storms at $207 billion, with another $25 billion in non-U.S. damage. Harm to the natural environment has largely not been tallied.The Puerto Rican parrot epitomizes the most vulnerable species to hurricane harm, explained Lisa Sorenson, executive director of BirdsCaribbean, an NGO devoted to regional bird conservation. “Species of greatest conservation concern are single island or regional endemics with small population sizes, that can be wiped out in a single hurricane.”A host of bird species found on 13 Caribbean islands fit this description, Sorenson said. That includes the Endangered imperial parrot (Amazona imperialis) endemic to Dominica — also known as the sisserou, it is the country’s national bird, and has been spotted just three times since a direct hit from Maria with sustained winds of 160 miles per hour did “mind boggling” damage to the island nation.Also likely hard hit by the season’s storms were the Threatened forest thrush (Turdus lherminieri) found on Dominica, Montserrat, St. Lucia and Guadeloupe; the Endangered yellow-shouldered blackbird (Agelaius xanthomus); and the Endangered Puerto Rican nightjar (Antrostomus noctitherus), restricted to that island territory.A Puerto Rican parrot aviary within the devastated landscape of El Yunque National Forest. The captive population, numbering nearly 200 birds, was kept safe during the storm, and repairs are now underway on the aviaries. Photo by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, image in the public domain“Threatened migrants to the region such as the Kirtland’s warbler (Setophaga kirtlandii) and piping plover (Charadrius melodus) are also vulnerable,” Sorenson said, along with long-legged wading birds such as the flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber); “being such an awkward bird, it’s pretty defenseless in a storm.” Thousands of flamingos were found dead in Cuba’s northern cays after Irma’s impact.“The greatest challenge [for birds] is in the weeks following the hurricane when food is very scarce and they have very little cover [from predators],” Sorenson said. To help with this, BirdsCaribbean is crowdfunding hurricane response efforts for affected habitats and wildlife. Long-term recovery is also challenging “because [bird species] are already under stress from so many other threats, including loss of their habitat to development, pollution, predation by invasive species, and hunting and capture for the pet trade.”Beyond birds, Lugo sees amphibian and marine life as especially vulnerable to hurricane damage across the Caribbean. “Frogs are of concern because they are already under stress, and drought or high temperatures associated with open canopies of rain forests are a threat to their survival. Assessments of how the frogs did [this hurricane season] are in progress,” he said. “Coral reefs also suffer due to [increased] sediments in the waters as well as lowering of salinities plus mechanical effects of waves.”A flamingo in Cuba’s northern keys, where thousands of flamingos were found dead after Irma’s landfall. Lisa Sorenson, of BirdsCaribbean, explained that long-legged waders such as flamingos are especially vulnerable to hurricanes, as they are “pretty defenseless in a storm.” Photo by Allan Hopkins on Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Resilient ecosystemsThere has been brighter news too concerning vulnerable species that apparently weathered the storms despite the odds. On Barbuda — where 95 percent of homes were destroyed by Irma, and the entire human population evacuated — the tiny, 10-gram Barbuda warbler (Setophaga subita), restricted to the island, has clung on. “We were very worried and at first only a few birds were found, but a more intensive survey in mid-October showed that a good number have survived,” Sorenson said.Back on U.S. soil, the season’s hurricanes forced some nationally protected areas to close, but for the most part life inside these conserved areas went on without noticeably harsh long term affects. Hurricane Harvey brought “unprecedented flooding to Southeast Texas,” said Jason Ginder, Park Ranger at Big Thicket National Preserve. But the resilience of Big Thicket’s natural ecosystem means it has “rebounded quickly,” with Harvey “leaving little long-term impacts” to habitats or species.In Florida, Irma caused “considerable damage to trees and other vegetation throughout Everglades National Park,” as well as bringing high water levels, reported Alice Clarke, who heads up the Science Communications team at the South Florida Natural Resources Center.The timing of the storm was fortunate for many species. “Irma occurred before the winter nesting season for most birds, including wading birds, bald eagles and osprey,” Clarke said. Subsequent surveys have found large flocks of shorebirds on nesting islands, and where nesting sites have been lost, Clarke anticipated that wading birds would continue to find suitable locations nearby.She added that the Florida coastal tidal surge may have washed out some sea turtle nests, but because the nesting season was winding down, and turtles lay multiple clutches, “some of their clutches may have survived to hatching.”A tiny, 10-gram Barbuda warbler. This species is just one of many that are of great conservation concern when hurricanes hit, explained Lisa Sorenson of BirdsCaribbean. Because they are endemic species with small populations, they’re susceptible to being wiped out by a single storm. But the Barbuda warbler appears to have survived against the odds, with a “good number” being recorded during surveys after Irma. Photo by Josh Noseworthy on Flickr, CC BY 2.0Mammals have also shown resilience, with dolphin and manatee adults and calves not showing any signs of negative impacts, Clarke said. In the Florida Keys, the small population of threatened Key Deer — a diminutive subspecies of the white-tailed deer, standing just 32 inches tall, and found nowhere else — also endured Irma’s impact relatively unscathed.As resilient as many species and ecosystems are, they still require time to recover from hurricane damage. Scientists think climate change contributed to hurricane activity and damage during the 2017 season: higher ocean temperatures fuel hurricane intensity, helping the big storms gather wind speed and collect moisture. Storms like Harvey also do more damage when they stall over one area due to changes in the Jet Stream, another more commonly seen pattern as climate change evolves. Finally, as the world warms, the atmosphere is able to contain more moisture — about 7 percent more per 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degree Fahrenheit) of warming — which helps intensify individual precipitation events.With climate change models clearly pointing to more intense hurricanes and extreme precipitation events, nature, and especially endangered species already under stress, may find it a whole lot harder to bounce back in coming decades.Citation:Finer M, Olexy T (2017) United States’ only National Tropical Rainforest ravaged by Hurricane Maria (Puerto Rico). MAAP: 73FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

For Australia’s fire-starting falcons, pyromania serves up the prey

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Australia’s indigenous peoples have long spoken of birds of prey intentionally starting bushfires to flush out prey.In a new study, researchers have now compiled observations and anecdotes from scientific reports, firefighters and Aboriginal peoples to get a better understanding of how such bird-caused fires spread in Australia’s Northern Territory.Overall, most instances of fire-spreading by birds seem to be intentional, the authors say, but it is hard to say how common such fires are. Some birds in Australia use smoldering sticks to spread wildfires and flush out smaller birds, insects, frogs and other prey, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Ethnobiology.This fire-spreading behavior isn’t a new discovery, the authors of the study say. Australia’s indigenous peoples have long spoken of “firehawks” — a generic term for the black kite (Milvus migrans), whistling kite (Haliastur sphenurus) and brown falcon (Falco berigora) — intentionally spreading fires in the country’s tropical savannas. But much of the examples remain fragmented.So the researchers compiled observations and anecdotes from scientific reports, firefighters and Aboriginal peoples to get a better understanding of how such bird-caused fires spread in Australia’s Northern Territory. Some compelling examples came from the co-authors of the study.Co-author and former firefighter Dick Eussen, for instance, was fighting a blaze at the Ranger uranium mine near Kakadu, Northern Territory, in the 1980s when he was alerted to a new blaze on the unburned side of the road.“He drove over and put it out, noting a whistling kite flying about 20 meters [66 feet] in front of him with a smoking stick in its talons,” the authors write in the study. “It dropped the stick and smoke began to curl from the dry grass, starting a spot fire that had to be immediately extinguished. In all, he put out seven fires, all caused by the kites.”Whistling kites are common birds of prey in Australia. Photo by Athena Ferreira via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0). Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Birds Of Prey, Conservation, Environment, Fires, Forest Fires, Green, Raptors, Research, Savannas, wildfires, Wildlife Hawks hunting in and around a controlled brushfire, Mount Etna Caves National Park, Central Queensland. The birds are a mixture of black kites and whistling kites. Photo by Mark Marathon via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0).Citation:Bonta, M. et al. (2018). Intentional Fire-Spreading by “Firehawk” Raptors in Northern Australia. Journal of Ethnobiology. 37(4):700-718.center_img Nathan Ferguson, also a co-author and officer-in-charge of a fire station in the Barkly Tablelands, initially discounted reports of fire-spreading by birds. But after years of experience he “has learned to incorporate the possibility of avian fire-spreading as a variable in bushfire management,” the authors write. In 2016, for example, Ferguson observed a few kites “successfully seizing burning sticks in their beaks, sometimes switching them to their talons, transporting them over 50 meters [164 feet], dropping them, and, thus, igniting unburned grass.”The study also quotes experiences and observations of several indigenous peoples. In one such account, in Douglas Lockwood’s 1963 autobiography I, the Aboriginal, the indigenous Australian Waipuldanya says: “Not only the hawks used the ruse of deliberate grass fires as an aid to hunting. We often did so ourselves, especially towards the end of the long dry season when food was scarce and ten-feet [3-meter] tall speargrass, which burnt readily, was a natural haven for game. It is possible that our forefathers learnt this trick from the birds.”Overall, most instances of fire-spreading by birds seem to be deliberate, the authors write, and some other experts agree. By spreading fires to unburned areas, the birds force more prey to flee and become easy targets for their next meal.“There’s a purpose,” Robert Gosford, a co-author of the study, told the Washington Post. “There’s an intent to say, okay, there are several hundred of us there, we can all get a meal.”Although it is hard to say how common such bird-caused fires are, scientific acceptance of such fire-spreading would help in better planning of fire management and conservation efforts, the authors write.“Though Aboriginal rangers and others who deal with bushfires take into account the risks posed by raptors that cause controlled burns to jump across firebreaks, official skepticism about the reality of avian fire-spreading hampers effective planning for landscape management and restoration,” they add. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

‘Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise’ film shows how farmers are fighting climate change

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Climate Change, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Food, Education, Environment, Extreme Weather, Film, Flooding, Green, Oceans, Overpopulation, Population Article published by Shreya Dasgupta A recent documentary looks at how Bangladeshi farmers are adapting to rising sea levels.The film documents how Bangladeshi farmers are keeping their farms from flooding by building floating gardens made of water hyacinth and bamboo.The film won the Best Short Film at the New York WILD Film Festival, which begins on Feb. 22.Mongabay interviewed cultural anthropologist Alizé Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important. This is a story of hope.Bangladesh is extremely vulnerable to climate change. Threatened by rising sea levels, storms and cyclones, floods have become commonplace, with seawater encroaching both homes and agricultural farms. But Bangladeshi people have found ingenious ways of adapting to the rising sea level. A recent documentary, “Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise,” explores one such example of resilience.To keep their farms from flooding, Bangladeshi farmers have been building floating gardens — farms made of water hyacinth and bamboo that float on water, no matter what the water level. These floating gardens help the people “fish, raise ducks, and grow produce,” Alizé Carrère, a cultural anthropologist and National Geographic explorer, told National Geographic in 2016.“Adaptation Bangladesh,” featuring Carrère and directed by documentary filmmaker Justin DeShields, looks not only at simple floating farms that farmers have traditionally used in flood-prone areas, but also explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries, and even high-tech floating farms that could potentially provide food for entire cities. For Carrère, it was important to document these “slices of hope.”“So while I sometimes wonder if people will criticize these stories as futile or inaccurate portrayals given what’s coming down the pike, I have to remind myself that those small narratives (and practices) of resilience are all that we have left,” she told Mountain film education. “And frankly, most of what we’ve used so far to push people to action on climate change are doomsday narratives, which clearly haven’t been working. So why not try a new, more uplifting narrative and see where it brings us?”“Adaptation Bangladesh: Sea Level Rise” won the Best Short Film award at the New York WILD Film Festival, held at the Explorers Club in Manhattan, which began Feb. 22 (watch the trailer here).Mongabay interviewed Carrère to learn more about why she chose to focus on Bangladesh and why this story is important.Buoyant fields made of plants and manure can support crops in Bangladesh. Carrère (at right) toured several with Bangladeshi reporter Tania Rashid. Photo by Katia Nicolova.Mongabay: What makes Bangladesh a good location for a film about climate change and rising sea levels?Alizé Carrère: Bangladesh is one of the most climate vulnerable countries in the world, for a multitude of reasons. To begin with, it’s a giant river delta. Bangladesh sits at the confluence of the Ganges, Jamuna and Meghna rivers, so it’s flat and extremely wet. Any fluctuation in sea level rise or monsoon patterns dramatically impacts the population, many of whom live on or near the water. It’s also the most densely populated country on our planet — more than 160 million people live in a landmass the size of Wisconsin. That’s staggering. When you have that many people living so close together, and when the environment is so susceptible to minor fluctuations in water levels, you end up with a highly vulnerable population. On top of that it is also a very impoverished country, so the alternatives for most people are limited once flooding occurs.How did you come to look at climate adaptation efforts in Bangladesh, and how did the film come about?I actually learned about the floating gardens of Bangladesh in college, when I took a geography course at McGill University. I was fascinated by the concept: if you could build gardens that float, then you’re not beholden to your environment. Regardless of what the water level is, your farm stays afloat, continuing to provide food even during the wettest months of the year (when all fields are under water). I loved this idea, and started finding other examples of resilience and practical design in the face of change. Once I started collecting these stories, it gave rise to the idea of making a series. We started with the case study in Bangladesh.Whereas we normally hear a lot of doom and gloom about climate change, Adaptation Bangladesh seems to strike something of a hopeful note by focusing on the ways farmers are attempting to cope with sea level rise. What are some of the key adaptations you feature in the film?The film looks at four different adaptive designs as it relates to sea level rise and erratic monsoon patterns: traditional floating farms made of extremely simple materials (all organic plants), more advanced floating farms made with recycled materials, floating school boats and libraries, and finally, large-scale, high-tech floating farms out in the ocean that could provide food for entire cities.In your time with them, how hopeful did these farmers seem that they could adapt to climate change and even perhaps continue to thrive in a warming world?That’s a tough question, and I think it changes depending on where you are and who you’re talking to. Bangladeshis have always lived with, on and around water, and therefore constantly adjust to it. To be surrounded by water demands, in some way, that you always stay present. You can’t project too far into the future about the way things will be, because water is incredibly fickle and may be one way today and completely different tomorrow. And when that’s your dominant landscape feature, you get pretty good at, quite literally, going with the flow. From our conversations, and from what I saw, this seemed to be the prevailing attitude. That’s not to say there isn’t suffering and difficulty with that reality, but it’s more of a take-each-day-as-it-comes mentality.Bangladeshi farmers use floating farms to grow food. Photo by Katia Nicolova.These farmers must still be facing significant challenges. Which of those challenges seemed most daunting to you?Population growth. I can’t put into words how intense it is to be immersed in such a densely inhabited area such as Dhaka, the capital city. I had never seen anything like it. You can be the most sustainable population in the world, but when there’s 160 million of you – and the land on which you live is disappearing before your very eyes – it’s not easy. Population growth is something we have to start thinking about more seriously in general, somehow it seems like the climate change conversation has taken over the population conversation in the last two decades. I don’t have the answer to it, but I do think we underestimate the power of educating girls and young women. When they have agency in their own lives, it creates a trickle-down effect and results in healthier decision-making for themselves and their families.There is obvious value in telling these farmers’ stories, but what do you hope this film can achieve in a broader sense? What are the main takeaways for people who maybe don’t live in an area subject to such severe sea level rise?I always say that adaptation is more of a mindset than it is a practice. To me, this project is about waking up the part of ourselves that has allowed us to exist for as long as we have in the first place – and that’s our ability to be resilient and adaptive in our thinking. Most of my work is looking at the positive, but truthfully, the most depressing part is that those of us living in relative comfort and stability are the least adaptable of all! It gets back to the old adage, “necessity is the mother of invention.” There’s something about people who have nothing between them and environmental change that we can all learn from, and my goal with this series is to start bringing those lessons of creativity into classrooms so that young minds can start thinking differently for our future. We will not solve our present-day issues with traditional, linear approaches. I do a lot of work in schools and with educators, and it’s amazing to see how kids absorb this content. They are so much better at it than adults – they have no limits to their imagination, and that’s exactly what we need.What are the distribution plans for the film? When and where can the public see it?We’re still working on that right now, but in the meantime I’m working on putting together a website. Ultimately this project is more than just the series. With the help of an educational consultant, we’re starting to design curriculum around each case study, so that any student, teacher or citizen can go to the site, watch the episodes, and then download educational content if they want to dive deeper into the issues. I’m hoping to have this up by the end of the year.This film is part of a series, correct? What’s coming next?Yes, that’s right. It’s a 6-part series that looks at 6 distinct case studies around the world where we see people innovatively adapting to landscape changes. I’ve been following these different case studies/communities for the last few years now, and will be heading to Vanuatu for the month of May as the next installment. I don’t want to reveal too many details, but it has to do with starfish compost!Large farms made of water hyacinth keep the farms afloat and safe from floods. Photo by Katia Nicolova.The film explores not just traditional floating farms but explores more advanced floating farms, schools and libraries. Photo by Andy Maser.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

ICC slams ‘disrespectful’ West Indies

first_imgDUBAI, United Arab Emirates (CMC):Cricket’s governing body, the International Cricket Council (ICC), blasted the West Indies cricket team for the behaviour of some of its players following the final of the Twenty20 World Cup in India earlier this month.In an unusual step yesterday, the ICC labelled the players’ behaviour as “inappropriate and disrespectful” and argued that it “brought the event into disrepute”.In a statement following a meeting of its board over the weekend, the ICC said it had even given “serious consideration” to bringing sanctions against the players.INAPPROPRIATE”The board considered the behaviour of some of the West Indies players in the immediate aftermath of the final and unanimously agreed that certain comments and actions were inappropriate, disrespectful, and brought the event into disrepute,” the governing body said.”The board acknowledged an apology by the WICB but was disappointed to note that such behaviour had detracted from the success of what was otherwise a magnificent tournament and final.”West Indies beat England by four wickets in a dramatic final over in Kolkata to win their second Twenty20 World Cup, following their triumph four years ago in Sri Lanka.Many of the Caribbean players celebrated wildly afterwards, with some removing their shirts as they danced in delight.West Indies captain Darren Sammy also stunned many by openly criticising the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) during the official post-game interview and highlighting the players’ ongoing pay dispute, which had marred the build-up to the tournament.Man-of-the-Match Marlon Samuels was also fined for his verbal tirade against bowler Ben Stokes during the final over of the game.While not specifying exactly what behaviour the ICC found offensive, the ICC chairman, Shashank Manohar, said the Windies players actions were not “acceptable conduct” for ICC events.”The sport of cricket is proud of its unique spirit and this involves being gracious in victory as well as defeat and respectful at all times to the game, one’s opponents, the sponsors and the fans,” Manohar said.”The Board also noted that very serious consideration had been given to bringing Code of Conduct charges in respect of the behaviour of the West Indies players and emphasised that this was not acceptable conduct at ICC events played out on a world stage in front of millions of people around the globe.”Following Sammy’s interview, WICB president Dave Cameron also tendered an apology for what the board deemed to be his “inappropriate” comments and promised to investigate.last_img read more

Big 2nd quarter propels Raptors to rout of slumping Celtics

first_imgCeltics: Host Portland on Wednesday night.Raptors: Host Portland on Friday night.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Marcus Morris scored 17 points, and Jayson Tatum and Terry Rozier each had 11 as Boston lost for the fifth time in seven games. The Celtics are 0-3 since play resumed following the All-Star break.“We have to be a lot more connected as a team,” Celtics coach Brad Stevens said. “That’s been the theme for a while.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsCeltics guard Marcus Smart echoed his coach’s assessment.“Nobody is together,” Smart said. “We’ve got to have everybody on the same page doing the same things at the same time.” Still, Celtics guard Kyrie Irving wasn’t on the same page when asked to respond to Smart’s comments.“That’s Marcus’ opinion,” Irving said, declining to answer after being asked whether he agreed with his teammate.Irving also had little to say about Stevens’ comment that Boston is taking too many “shortcuts” on defense.“I don’t know,” Irving said. “It’s up to Brad.”Irving scored seven points. It was his lowest-scoring game since he had three points against Detroit on Oct. 27.ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Serge Ibaka scored 14 points and Norm Powell added 11 as Toronto extended its home winning streak over Boston to eight. The Celtics have not win in Canada since a 117-116 overtime victory on April 4, 2015.Kyle Lowry had 11 assists and Toronto led by as many as 31, turning the game around by outscoring Boston 36-13 in the decisive second.“Everything they did took us out of what we wanted to do,” Boston’s Al Horford said.The Raptors have won 15 of 17 at home, where they’re 26-6 overall.Toronto made 17 3-pointers, one shy of a season-high. Siakam matched his career-best by connecting four times in five attempts from long range.The Celtics led 32-30 after one quarter and scored the opening points of the second, but the Raptors answered with an 18-0 run to lead 48-34 at 7:14. Leonard’s fast break dunk at 3:06 put Toronto up by 20, 59-39.“We locked in a little more,” Siakam said. “We got some stops. Obviously, when we get stops we’re dangerous in transition.”The Celtics had twice as many turnovers in the second quarter (eight) as made baskets (four).“I thought we were outplayed in every which way,” Stevens said.Toronto led 66-45 at halftime. Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Claressa Shields in another boxing 1st on Showtime MOST READ Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. TIP-INSCeltics: G Brad Wanamaker (illness) was not available. … The Celtics shot six for 30 from 3-point range. … Boston has lost three straight on the road.Raptors: Toronto had 11 assists on 14 made baskets in the second. … The Raptors went 8-1 in February. … Toronto lost both visits to Boston this season, including one overtime defeat. Boston and Toronto split their four meetings this season, with the home team winning each time. The home team has won 11 straight in the series.TITANS OF TUESDAYToronto improved to 9-0 on Tuesdays, while the Celtics dropped to 5-1.FAST WORKThe Raptors outscored the Celtics 29-9 in fast break points.UNDER 100Toronto is 11-1 when holding opponents below 100 points, while Boston is 3-6 when failing to score at least 100.UP NEXT Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history LATEST STORIES Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title View comments Boston Celtics guard Kyrie Irving (11) shadows Toronto Raptors guard Danny Green (14) during first half NBA basketball action in Toronto on Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019. (Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP)TORONTO — A lack of togetherness is turning into big trouble for the struggling Boston Celtics.Pascal Siakam scored 25 points, Kawhi Leonard had 21 and the Toronto Raptors used a huge second quarter to rout Boston 118-95 on Tuesday night.ADVERTISEMENT Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazillast_img read more

Sheriff, D.A. seek extra budget funds

first_imgYaroslavsky said most of the money pays for increased salaries and benefits and rising costs for items like fuel, but $65 million is for new programs. “This is a 17 (percent) or 18 percent increase,” Yaroslavsky said. “That is the single largest increase in net county cost of investment in the Sheriff’s Department since I’ve been here.” But Baca said additional investment in the department will pay dividends in terms of a safer community. “My dream, and I believe the board’s dream, is to make this county as safe as possible so poor neighborhoods can have Starbucks, a Macy’s store and economic viability where people can get jobs,” Baca said. “In all my experiences in 41 years, these poor neighborhoods are not going to regain economic competition with affluent neighborhoods until the public safety issues are resolved.” The supervisors will decide later whether to approve the additional requests. troy.anderson@dailynews.com (213) 974-8985160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Although Los Angeles County’s proposed budget includes boosted funding for the Sheriff’s Department and Public Defender’s Office, officials argued Wednesday that even more is needed. District Attorney Steve Cooley told the Board of Supervisors that its proposed budget for his office is inadequate to deal with increased demand for services. “Although the public defender’s budget includes new positions for caseload growth and new courts, no additional resources have been recommended for my department … despite the fact that felony filings have increased 21 percent since 2001,” Cooley said. Cooley, who has requested an extra $9 million on top of his $327 million proposed budget, said new courts have opened recently in Van Nuys, Alhambra, Compton and two in the Antelope Valley. “There has been no budget recognition for these new courts,” Cooley said. “This situation forces the department to transfer staff from other work units to provide representation for the people.” Cooley requested the additional $9 million to provide mandated staffing for the new courts, to increase the number of captains in the Bureau of Investigation, expand staffing to address soaring identity-theft cases and to staff parole hearings for inmates serving life sentences, mostly for murder. Sheriff Lee Baca also requested an extra $150 million on top of his $2.3 billion proposed budget. He had originally requested $3 billion. The extra $150 million request would pay for more medical services and beds in overcrowded jails, a Gang Emergency Operations Center, more patrols in unincorporated areas, psychologists to help personnel deal with job stress and increased training. Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky said the department’s proposed budget increase – not including Baca’s new request – is already the largest in at least a decade. last_img read more