What Happens When the Financial Capital of the World Moves

first_img Categories: ECM Tags: Deflation, Pound, Separatist Movements, USD « The Next Cycle in the ECM Beginning January 2020 Look at the British pound during the American Civil War. It was the rally in the pound that began the breakup of the British Empire, as I have warned will happen to the US dollar. That rise in the pound exported DEFLATION to the British Empire and the economic conditions led to the start of separatist movements. Canada won its independence on July 1, 1867. The second major wave of separatist movements came with the end of World War II. India won its independence on August 15, 1947.The United States will be at risk of also breaking apart under economic conditions, which will fuel both the religious and political battles between left and right. There will be a high probability that the United States will break into regional groups, probably four major regions in general. It does not mean life will come to an end or that we all have to run and hide in a cave. The British survived as will Americans. If we understand the cycle, we will be better positioned to survive with security. QUESTION:Hi Marty,Knowing that the financial capital will likely move to China after 2032, since that would be the peak of the public wave, where will someone in the US put their capital?Usually, the move from public to private would result in a move into sovereign debt and cash, but will the move after 2032 be different given the sovereign debt and monetary crisis we will be going through these next few years.Thanks!SBANSWER: Britain was the Financial Capital of the World until World War I. This chart illustrates what happened to Britain and how it lost that stature of being the Financial Capital of the World — it was debt. The people in Britain did not lose everything. What really happened was that the separatist movement emerged and the British Empire began to break up. The Great Alignment & 2020 »last_img read more

Our Obsession With Possession

first_imgby, Angie Mcallister, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShare1ShareEmail1 Sharesnursing-home-wheelchairLet’s face it. Today most of the world is obsessed with ownership. We love to discuss our lives, our cars, our homes, our children, our jobs, our electronics and numerous other belongings. In most cases, we lovingly refer to all of these things as ours, throwing up the word “my” in some instances.If you listen closely enough, you will hear the word “my” used very often in the long term care world. If you hang around a skilled nursing facility any length of time, you will hear the term “my resident” used. Sometimes you may even hear it taken a step further to incorporate the word “little” so it now becomes “my little resident”.My. The word “my” suggests ownership. In the above example it suggests ownership over other living beings. I guess we use it most often with our children. Of course, we have cause to argue the term in that sense because we actually give birth to our children. They truly are part of us, we clothe them, we feed them, and we naturally feel we have ownership in their lives. So the question we should ask is why do we use the term so frequently when discussing Elders living in skilled nursing facilities? Is it because we have become so task-oriented as a society that we only see the tasks that must be done?I think the worst part of it all to me is I used to do it too. I can remember using terms like “my,” “still,” and perhaps the worst one of all “aww” when referring to Elders living in some of our homes. As I have grown and evolved in the person-directed-care movement, I have realized more than ever the impact of the words I use and how they leave a footprint on those around me.We are trained to see the tasks that are before us. When I started working in long term care as a nursing assistant several years ago, I was taught to look at all the tasks that needed to be accomplished. I was given “ownership” over individuals and I planned their day. At that time, healthcare for me was as ritualistic as owning a dog. Feed them, bathe them, clothe them, walk them, toilet them, and because they were “mine”, I could control all of those routines as I wanted.It was only when I began to step away from those tasks and routines that I could see more clearly. I can remember sitting in Savannah, Georgia with a WW2 hero from the skilled nursing facility I worked at during the time and realizing this person was so much more than the tasks we associated him with. I remember the day he approached me about the trip and how important it would be for him to take it. Several months later, I had learned more from my relationship with him than most people could have taught me in years. I learned that sometimes it is easy to put our expectations on others and force limitations on them that aren’t really theirs. As Murray and I made our way through the museum that afternoon, I learned the power of person directed care in its truest form. Murray, having actually survived 29 missions during WW2 into enemy territory while battling German fighter planes, was given the opportunity to lead the tour by the formal guide. He spent the afternoon telling everyone in the museum about his experiences being part of the “Bloody 100th Bomb Squad”. In one afternoon he went from merely being a “patient” in a long term care facility to a “teacher” with more experience and wisdom than any professor I had ever met.Words have vast power. They can cause us to dream of faraway places, remember passages of time that are no longer, and give us strength to face tomorrow. Knowing this, if we are to truly change the culture facing aging, we should give precedent to changing our vocabulary. So many times we seek to change physical environments and structures but give little thought to the things that we let slip out of our mouth from day to day. True change brings a true shift in the way we see things. When we view things differently, then we say things differently. When our language begins to change, then we cause others around us to have a paradigm shift as well. I think Emily Dickinson said it best when she said, “I know nothing in the world that has as much power as a word. Sometimes I write one, and I look at it until it begins to shine.” Related PostsTweetShare1ShareEmail1 SharesTags: language nursing home quality of life skilled nursinglast_img read more

Rockefeller scientists shed new light on the neuroscience of sleep

first_imgJun 1 2018A good night of sleep entails about eight hours of blissful immobility–a state of near paralysis that, though welcome at night, would be inconvenient during the day. In a recent paper published in Cell Reports, Rockefeller scientists shed new light on the transitions between a wakeful, active state and the stillness of sleep.Through a series of experiments in the roundworm C. elegans, the researchers show that glial cells play an unexpected role in ensuring that worms don’t suddenly succumb to sleep-associated immobility. It’s the latest in a growing list of functions ascribed to glial cells, which were once thought to function solely as scaffolding for neurons, but are turning out to be sophisticated biological actors in their own right.The research may offer new insight into the function of glial cells in humans, and reveals a nuanced relationship between sleep and movement.Narcoleptic wormsIn C. elegans, a type of glial cell known as CEPsh glia surround neurons in the worm version of a brain, and are known to wrap around select synapses, the connections between neurons. Shai Shaham, Rockefeller’s Richard E. Salomon Family Professor, and research associate Menachem Katz took an interest in CEPsh cells because they seemed to share many features with astrocytes, star-shaped glial cells suspected by some scientists to regulate sleep in humans and other vertebrates.To better understand the function of CEPsh glia, the team developed a line of C. elegans that lacked these cells,then monitored the tiny worms’ movements. The scientists noticed that, often, the animals abruptly stopped in place for seconds to minutes at a time–an unusual behavior for this type of worm.”We can watch C. elegans all day when they search for food, and we rarely see them stop. The worms lacking CEPsh glia were abnormal–they looked narcoleptic,” says Katz.The researchers also found that during lethargus, a sleep-like state associated with molting, C. elegans without CEPsh glia fell asleep abnormally early and stayed asleep for a longer-than-usual amount of time. Overall, worms lacking CEPsh glia appeared to possess an increased propensity for sleep.Related StoriesSleep quality linked to memory problems in new studySleep makes synapses ready for new learningSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costs”They’re like teenagers,” says Shaham.The scientists also noticed that the modified worms matured through larval stages at a slower pace than controls. They were surprised by this outcome, which suggests that healthy development depends in part on healthy sleep patterns.A sleepy synapseNext, the team examined the neurons whose synapses are covered with CEPsh glia. Specifically, they looked at the connection between ALA, a neuron involved in sleep, and AVE, a neuron that controls movement. They found that this synapse is inhibitory, meaning that when ALA is active, AVE can’t do its job.Katz and Shaham believe that ALA is responsible for their worms’ apparent drowsiness. When they removed ALA neurons in C. elegans lacking CEPsh cells, these worms no longer displayed the odd behavior seen in previous trials: movement, sleep, and development returned to normal.These findings suggest that, when CEPsh cells are absent, ALA inhibits AVE continuously, thereby impeding movement at inappropriate times. But CEPsh glia seem to counteract ALA neurons, permitting normal movement. “When the animal needs to be moving, the glia are important in making sure that AVE isn’t listening to ALA,” says Shaham.Furthermore, Katz and Shaham discovered that ALA inhibits movement without completely deactivating AVE, an usual decoupling of neuronal activity and motor output. “That’s a very exciting concept,” Shaham says.”We spend more than a third of our life asleep. But we don’t really understand what it’s good for, and we don’t understand how it works,” says Shaham. “In the worm, we’ve now shown that animals don’t develop properly if sleep is messed up–and we’ve uncovered aspects of the underlying control processes. Given that sleep is so ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, our work may provide important general insights.”Source: https://www.rockefeller.edu/news/22750-drowsy-worms-offer-new-insights-neuroscience-sleep/last_img read more

Patients with colon cancers on the right side have worse survival rates

first_imgJul 24 2018Patients with colorectal cancer tumors on the right side may have poorer five-year survival rates than those whose tumors are located on the left side. However, a new large-scale retrospective study is the first to demonstrate a potential improvement of these outcomes. Study results show that nearly doubling the benchmark number of lymph nodes removed during operations for right-sided colon cancers improves the survival rate for these patients, according to researchers who presented these findings at the 2018 American College of Surgeons (ACS) Quality and Safety Conference.Several studies in recent years have shown that patients with colon cancers on the right side have worse short- and long-term survival rates than those with left-sided tumors regardless of the stage of the disease at diagnosis or the nature of treatment. Additional studies have begun to re-examine the surgical management of patients with right-sided colon cancer.For years the consensus among professional surgical and cancer treatment societies has held that, at a minimum, 12 lymph nodes should be removed and analyzed to determine the prognosis and treatment of patients with colon cancer on either side. The ACS Commission on Cancer (CoC) has identified this standard as a quality performance indicator for surgical treatment. As presented at the ACS conference, these study results are the first to link improved survival with a harvest of more than 20 lymph nodes in the treatment of right-sided cancer.Investigators from Florida Hospital, Orlando, and McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, collected information from the National Cancer Database (NCDB) about patients who underwent surgical removal of the colon for non-metastatic colon adenocarcinoma between 2004 and 2014. After adjusting for patient and disease characteristics as well as the type of systemic treatment, researchers grouped data by tumor location. Of a total of approximately 505,000 patients whose records were entered into the NCDB, 273,200 had right-sided tumors.Overall five-year survival for this group of patients with right-sided tumors was 66 percent for stage II disease and 56 percent for stage III cancer. In comparison, survival rates were 70 percent and 60 percent for patients with left-sided stage II and III cancers. Among patients with right-sided cancer, the survival rate improved by approximately 20 percent when 22 or more lymph nodes were harvested during patients’ operations.Findings from the study suggest that colorectal surgeons may want to take extra steps to improve lymph node harvest for patients with right-sided disease. Colorectal surgeons from Florida Hospital and McGill University Health Centre are using near-infrared fluorescent scanning to map the lymph node drainage basins around tumors to potentially better identify lymph node metastases.Related StoriesBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancer”We’re injecting tumors with indocyanine green dye so we can find suspicious lymph nodes. During surgical resection, we’re specifically targeting those extra nodes to get better staging,” said study author Lawrence Lee, MD, PhD, a colorectal surgeon and PhD in epidemiology at McGill University Health Centre.The study also may prompt surgeons to begin reexamining the type of operations they perform on patients with right-sided colorectal tumors.”Lymph node harvest is related to the extent of the surgical resection. If removal of more lymph nodes improves survival of patients with right-sided cancer, these patients may need a more extensive resection than is considered to be standard for them,” Dr. Lee said.Operations currently differ for left- and right-sided colon cancers. The standard procedure for patients with left-sided cancers involves high central vascular ligation (CVL) of major blood vessels up near the aorta. CVL is not usually done for patients with right-sided cancers because the abdominal anatomy and vascular networks are complicated and operating around them increases operative time and the risk of complications.Surgical teams in Asia and Europe have recently reported on small, single-center studies of laparoscopic or robotic extended right-sided resections with CVL that did not increase operative time or complication rate and improved short- and long-term outcomes.”The kinds of vascular ligations that are required to get a greater nodal harvest on the right side mean the surgeon is dissecting around really big blood vessels. It’s a larger resection overall on that side, and the more vasculature that’s involved, the higher the risk for anastomotic breakdown and injury to these blood vessel. So surgeons may not want to do more resection on right-sided colon cancers,” said Dr. Lee.A multicenter, randomized prospective study is required to establish the value of an extended resection and CVL on the right side. As Dr. Lee acknowledged, “We don’t know the answer to the risk/reward ratio, but our study shows there’s enough of a difference in survival with greater surgical resection that we need a better understanding of the way we’re operating on the right side.” Source:https://www.facs.orglast_img read more

Overfishing could push European fish species to extinction

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The situation could be even worse, because scientists lack enough information to properly assess some 20% of the fish species present in European waters. Rainer Froese, a marine ecologist at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany, fears many of these species are threatened. “We have no clue how big the population is, whether it’s shrinking, what percentage is it now of what it should be—we just don’t know,” he says. “But there’s a high suspicion that actually they are not in good shape.”The report recommends the immediate reduction of targets and incidental catches of species identified as threatened. They should also ensure that healthy species are harvested at sustainable levels.Many species don’t have any catch limits established, such as sharks in the Mediterranean. The blue shark, for example, is one of the most exploited species in European waters. It’s a major slice of the global fin trade, and Spain is by far the biggest exporter of shark fins and meat, but the fishing industry can harvest as much as they want.The new Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), which came into force in January 2014, will change the situation. It mandates the end of overfishing by requiring catch limits on all commercial species by 2020. In the foreword to the IUCN report, European Commission Director Pia Bucella writes that its findings will be “crucial” for informing the CFP and other marine policies.Froese says that Europe has a ways to go to really protect its biodiversity, but he remains optimistic. “We have the right laws,” he says, even though their implementation, he adds, is slow and uncertain. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img More than 90 species of marine fishes in Europe’s waters are threatened with extinction, according to a report published today by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Sharks, rays, and other cartilaginous fish are at greatest risk, with about 40% facing extinction. The main threat is overfishing, the report warns.Europe’s marine fisheries are among the most productive in the world, supporting the livelihoods of 5.4 million people across the European Union and generating a gross added value of almost €500 billion annually. Unfortunately, the fisheries are being harmed by pollution, coastal development, offshore oil and gas, and mining. What really pushes some species toward extinction, however, is unregulated overfishing. “There’s been no effective movement on fisheries management in the Mediterranean in the last decade”, says Nicholas Dulvy, a marine ecologist at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, Canada, and one of the report’s authors.The report, which was funded by the European Commission, is the first complete assessment of the extinction risk for all the marine fish in the region. Dulvy and other scientists evaluated the status of more than 1200 species native to the Mediterranean Sea, the Black Sea, the Baltic Sea, the North Sea, and the European part of the Atlantic Ocean. Although conservation measures have been successful in improving stocks for some species, such as Atlantic cod and Atlantic bluefin tuna, other species, such as Atlantic halibut, Atlantic salmon, and turbot, still need help. The populations of more than 90 other species have plummeted low enough that they could go extinct, the report warns.  Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Trove of teeth from cave represents oldest modern humans in China

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe But Petraglia and others have unearthed sophisticated stone tools from the Arabian Peninsula and India, persuading him that modern humans left Africa as long ago as 125,000 years, settled in a then-wet Arabia, then pushed into India and eastward (Science, 29 August 2014, p. 994). Skeptics counter that other archaic humans could have made the tools, and that fossils are needed as proof.Hence the excitement about the teeth reported this week in Nature, from Fuyan Cave in Daoxian in southern China, about 600 kilometers northwest of Hong Kong. A team led by Wu Liu and Xiu-Jie Wu of the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing found small teeth with slender roots that barely differed from modern Chinese teeth. Indeed, the wear pattern and shape of the teeth are so modern that some wonder how they could be so old.The dates come from a small stalagmite, part of a flowstone that capped the layer holding the teeth. The team used the radioactive decay of uranium to thorium to date this stalagmite to 80,000 years ago—a minimum age for the teeth. Fossils of extinct elephants, hyenas, and pandas in the hominin layer are 120,000 years old at most, so the team concluded that the teeth are 80,000 to 120,000 years old, says co-author Maria Martinón-Torres of University College London.But the dated stalagmite came from a different trench than the teeth, and may be of a different age, says paleoanthropologist Russell  Ciochon of the University of Iowa in Iowa City: “The actual dates reported for Fuyan Cave are probably good but I doubt that the teeth are that old.”The authors insist that the stratigraphy in the cave is clear. Liu even argues that the find supports the radical—and minority—view that our species was born in China, not Africa. The discovery is likely to spur “a lot of debate,” Martinón-Torres says, “and force a new look at other alleged [H. sapiens] sites in China.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) For decades, anthropologists have tried to trace the patchy trail left by the earliest modern humans out of Africa. But they have been stymied by gaps in the fossil record or unreliable dates, especially in East Asia. Now, Chinese anthropologists report 47 teeth of Homo sapiens from a cave in southern China, dated to 80,000 to 120,000 years ago. If the dating is accurate, the discovery pushes back the appearance of our species in Asia by at least 30,000 years, wiping out a long-standing picture in which modern humans swept out of Africa in a single wave 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.“This changes everything. It’s the best evidence we have for modern humans in East Asia this early,” says archaeologist 
Michael Petraglia of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, who was not part of the work but has long advocated an early migration out of Africa. Others question the dates. “This case is better than the previous similar claims, but it is not fully convincing,” says paleoanthropologist Yousuke Kaifu of the National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo.Most researchers agree that modern humans arose in Africa and first ventured out of that continent into the Middle East about 120,000 to 90,000 years ago, as shown by skulls from Israel. But H. sapiens remains don’t appear in Europe, East Asia, and Australia until 40,000 to 50,000 years ago. Older fossils in Asia proposed as H. sapiens are controversial. Genetic studies, too, suggest that humanity’s great global expansion began just 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.center_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emaillast_img read more

Top stories Trumps pick for science a sunchasing probe and a better

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) An ambitious project to replicate experiments from 50 high-impact cancer biology papers now expects to complete just 18 studies. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology launched in October 2013, but quickly drew criticism from authors of the original studies that the contract labs lacked the expertise needed to replicate the work. The project was plagued by rising costs and delays, and it was eventually whittled down, as organizers reckoned with the difficulty of reproducing the studies.NASA’s Parker Probe will venture closer than ever to the sun to explore its mysterious atmosphereIn the coming weeks, NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is set to blast off toward the sun’s corona, a tenuous atmosphere of hot plasma, on the first of 24 flybys between now and 2024. During those flybys, its carbon heat shield must withstand temperatures up to a blistering 1370°C, keeping the probe from becoming a modern Icarus. If all goes well, the spacecraft will beam back over the course of its mission a record of the corona’s plasma and the tangled net of magnetic fields that shape it.Staying slim during pregnancy carries a priceScientists have long criticized Japan’s official guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy as too low. A recent survey shows many pregnant Japanese women strive to keep their weight gain below even those targets. This combination of factors has led to an unusually high percentage of low-weight births, which is likely the reason the height of the average Japanese adult has declined every year for those born after 1980. The trend could create long-term health problems, scientists warn, and affect longevity.This ‘flow battery’ could power green homes when the sun goes down and the wind stops blowingWith solar and wind electricity prices plunging, the hunt is on for cheap batteries to store all the resulting green power. Now, researchers have gotten one step closer with a new kind of flow battery, a device that uses pairs of electrodes to convert energy stored in chemicals into electricity and electrolytes to ferry charges from one electrode to another. Instead of expensive electrolytes made from vanadium metal, researchers are looking to cheaper, but shorter-lived organic molecules. In a recent study, researchers tinkered with a molecule called a quinone and extended its life span in a battery from days to years. By Frankie SchembriAug. 3, 2018 , 4:20 PM Trump’s pick to head White House science office gets good reviewsPresident Donald Trump announced this week that he intends to nominate meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier, a university administrator and former vice-chair of the governing board of the U.S. National Science Foundation, to be director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Although many in the research community lamented the nearly 560-day wait for the announcement of a presidential science adviser, Droegemeier, a respected veteran of the Washington, D.C., policymaking scene, has already garnered positive reviews from science and university groups.Plan to replicate 50 high-impact cancer papers shrinks to just 18 Top stories: Trump’s pick for science, a sun-chasing probe, and a better flow battery Email (Left to right): SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS; DAVIDE BONAZZI; BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY & THE NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY last_img read more

Anthraxcarrying flies follow monkeys through the forest

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Anthrax-carrying flies follow monkeys through the forest Nearly 12% of the flies carried sylvatic anthrax, which causes more than 38% of wildlife deaths in rainforest ecosystems. The researchers hypothesize that flies could be at least partially responsible for the persistent spread of the disease, which is transmitted by a different microbe from the type of anthrax that infects people. A few flies also carried the bacterium that causes yaws, a disfiguring skin disease that affects both humans and animals.Next, the team will explore whether flies follow groups of hunter-gatherer humans around, and whether these fly behaviors have caused primates to change their own behavior over time. Although mangabeys are known to use tools, researchers have not yet observed them wielding fly swatters.*Correction, 12 July, 3:55 p.m.: The original picture that ran with this item was of a chimpanzee, not a monkey. The image has been updated. By Eva FrederickJul. 12, 2019 , 1:30 PM Humans aren’t the only primates flies follow around. The insects tail monkeys, too, according to a new study, and they can carry deadly pathogens such as anthrax.Researchers followed a group of approximately 60 wild sooty mangabeys (their relative, the gray mangabey, is pictured), small furry monkeys with light-colored eyelids and long slender arms and legs, in the tropical rainforest of Taï National Park in Ivory Coast. They caught flies within the group of mangabeys and at distances up to 1 kilometer away. The researchers found about eight to 11 times more flies inside the group than in the rest of the forest. The same was true for three different groups of chimps.Next, the team gently dabbed nail polish on nearly 1600 flies to find out whether the same group of insects followed the mangabeys, or whether the primates attracted different flies as they moved through the trees. The marked flies kept turning up around the mangabeys, even 12 days later when the group had moved more than 1 kilometer away, the team reports in Molecular Ecology. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Mark Bowler/Science Source Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Top stories reefsupporting fish plasticmunching microbes and Burmese ambers ethical minefield

first_img Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) These tiny, mysterious fish may be key to solving coral reef ‘paradox’If a snorkeler or scuba diver is lucky enough to spy a cryptobenthic fish—named for its elusive nature—all they may glimpse is a brief flash of color. But these tiny swimmers may be a cornerstone of coral reefs, making it possible for bigger, more charismatic fish and many invertebrates to thrive, according to a new study.These tiny microbes are munching away at plastic waste in the ocean Top stories: reef-supporting fish, plastic-munching microbes, and Burmese amber’s ethical minefield (Left to right): TANE SINCLAIR-TAYLOR; ASHLEY COOPER PICS/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO; DANIELE MATTIOL Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Plastic makes up nearly 70% of all ocean litter, putting countless aquatic species at risk. But there is a tiny bit of hope—a teeny, tiny one to be precise: Scientists have discovered that microscopic marine microbes are eating away at the plastic, causing trash to slowly break down.Fossils in Burmese amber offer an exquisite view of dinosaur times—and an ethical minefieldChinese paleontologists are currently building a detailed chronicle of life in a tropical forest 100 million years ago, using amber mined across the border in Myanmar. Hundreds of scientific papers have emerged from the amber finds, and Chinese scientists hint at many more to come. But the fossils’ origins present scientists with an ethical minefield. Much of the amber comes from the conflict-ridden state of Kachin, where amber profits finance armed conflict and are leading to human rights violations.EPA plan to end funding for children’s health research leaves scientists scramblingDespite repeatedly expressing public support for children’s health, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is ending funding for a network of research centers focused on environmental threats to children, imperiling several long-running studies of pollutants’ effects on child development. The move, critics say, is part of a broader effort by President Donald Trump’s administration to downplay science that could lead to stricter regulations on polluting industries.Ship spies largest underwater eruption everLast week, Marc Chaussidon, director of the Institute of Geophysics in Paris, looked at seafloor maps from a recently concluded mission and saw a new mountain. Rising from the Indian Ocean floor between Africa and Madagascar was a giant edifice 800 meters high and 5 kilometers across. In previous maps, there had been nothing. His team, along with scientists from the French national research agency CNRS and other institutes, had seen the birth of a mysterious submarine volcano, the largest such underwater event ever witnessed. By Alex FoxMay. 24, 2019 , 3:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

Imported wolves settle in as Lake Superior island teems with moose

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Thirteen new radio-collared wolves are now scouting Isle Royale in Michigan and feasting on moose, whose numbers this winter reached 2060—the second highest estimate since ecologists began to study predators and prey on the island in 1958. The new wolves, imported to help restore the U.S. national park from overbrowsing by moose, are largely avoiding the territory of the remaining two wolves of the original population.Twenty female moose are also sporting radio collars, allowing biologists to watch both wolf and moose movements online. After 8 years essentially unfettered by predation because wolf numbers were so low, the moose population has been booming at 19% a year, according to data released today by Michigan Technological University (MTU) in Houghton.The new wolves are expected to check moose numbers and help restore balsam fir and other plants, according to National Park Service (NPS) planners. And the flood of GPS data is revealing “stuff we’ve never seen before,” says MTU wildlife ecologist Rolf Peterson, such as where moose congregate to feed on new spring growth. Peterson and his colleagues plan to chemically analyze the specific balsam fir trees moose eat to determine whether they choose twigs with compounds that may have anti-inflammatory properties. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country National Parks of Lake Superior Foundation A male wolf from Michipicoten, Canada, heads into its new home on Isle Royale in Michigan last month. Imported wolves settle in as Lake Superior island teems with moosecenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Christine MlotApr. 30, 2019 , 8:00 AM Email Meanwhile, the collared wolves are transmitting numerous locations where they cluster, presumed to be moose kills, which will help researchers collect moose bones. These new data “will totally redirect our attention,” Peterson says.Moose in the Great Lakes region are at the southernmost edge of their range, and they are declining as the climate changes—except on Isle Royale, notes Adrian Wydeven, a wildlife biologist retired from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in Cable. The new data may help scientists understand what’s behind that difference, he says. He sees the project “as more of a moose conservation effort rather than wolf conservation.”The NPS wolf relocation had a rough start, including a partial U.S. government shutdown in January, bad weather, and depleted funding. Two wolves died, one before transport, one after several weeks on the island; one imported female traveled back home when an ice bridge to the mainland formed in January.Eight wolves hail from Michipicoten Island Provincial Park in Canada across Lake Superior. (The others are from Minnesota and mainland Ontario in Canada.) Wolves on the smaller Ontario island had eliminated their chief prey, caribou, and had been subsisting mainly on beaver. These wolves appeared underfed, but they were relocated as a pack, boosting their chances of thriving on Isle Royale, Peterson says.Meanwhile, the island-born, highly inbred pair of the original population “is not giving up on each other,” says Peterson, who observed them from a spotter plane in February. As in previous mating seasons, the now 8-year-old female rebuffed the interest of the 10-year-old male, her father and half-sibling. They kept busy scent marking their territory in response to the relocated wolves as well as to tracks of other mainland wolves that apparently found their way across the ice bridge and back.The pair’s pedigree demonstrates the challenge of maintaining genetic diversity on Guam-size Isle Royale. “Inbreeding is basically inevitable due to the island’s small size,” says University of California, San Francisco, geneticist Jacqueline Robinson, who analyzed the genomes of 11 Isle Royale wolves from blood samples collected since 1988. To further diversify the population, NPS plans to import more wolves from Michigan this fall.last_img read more

Former local government official condemns politicization of local councils

first_imgShareTweetSharePinThomas addressing the Local Government Department awards ceremony recently Former Local Government Commissioner McDonald Thomas has said a council should not be used as a “mini parliament.He was addressing the awards ceremony of the Local Government Department held at the Dominica Public Service Union (DPSU) Building on Wednesday. “In effect, a council is akin to a Board of Directors or indeed the Cabinet of the community. It is not a mini parliament with government and opposition,” he said. According to McDonald, when a person is sworn in as a councillor, all other distinctions such as religious and political affiliations become secondary and the primary focus must be on carrying out his or her duties as the community’s government with distinction and within the parameters of the law.“So it is disturbing and outright insulting to the status and stature of local authorities, when councils become arenas for settling political squabbles,” he remarked.In fact, McDonald said, based on the community development model of local government here, “people are supposed to present themselves for service on local authorities as community members who are interested in the development of good government of the community, nothing else.”last_img read more

US visit risks Beijings fury for President of Taiwan

first_img Best Of Express Later Thursday at a reception held in Taiwan’s consular offices nearby, Tsai welcomed U.N. ambassadors from the countries, mostly in Latin America and islands in the Pacific Ocean, that recognize Taiwan despite pressure from China.She thanked them for helping to ensure that Taiwan’s voice is “heard around the world.”The United States broke formal diplomatic ties with Taiwan’s government in 1979, ending what was known as the two-China policy, in order to establish relations with China’s Communist government in Beijing. But the United States has maintained unofficial relations with Taiwan and has provided it with defensive weapons meant to deter a Chinese attack.Taiwan’s tensions with China, with which it has developed expansive commercial ties, have grown under Tsai, who has been president since 2016. A member of Taiwan’s independence-leaning Democratic Progressive Party, she has stressed what she has called the need to strengthen the country’s military defenses. They’re not afraid In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief While Tsai has visited the United States before, this was her first trip as president to New York, where Taiwan maintains a large unofficial consular and trade office just a few blocks from the United Nations. Taiwan is not a U.N. member and has no representatives, but 17 countries in the world body continue to maintain diplomatic relations with Taiwan.Tsai’s two-day New York itinerary, which required the Trump administration’s approval, included a summit of Taiwan and American business representatives and a dinner banquet with members of the Taiwanese American community.Her entourage, protected by federal agents and New York police officers, arrived at the midtown Grand Hyatt to a raucous welcome by hundreds of pro-Taiwan demonstrators.Across the street, a smaller but equally passionate group of pro-Beijing protesters was denouncing the visit. Advertising By New York Times | Published: July 12, 2019 8:26:17 am Donald Trump and Democrats clash over President’s ‘racist’ tweets Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook center_img The leader of Taiwan, the self-governing island of 24 million claimed by China, visited the United States on Thursday and said her people would “never be intimidated,” risking China’s wrath and a further fraying of ties between Beijing and the Trump administration.The visit by President Tsai Ing-wen of Taiwan, which includes stopovers in New York and Denver, is happening over the objections of China.Tsai made the trip in the midst of a protracted trade dispute between China and the United States, and just a few days after the Defense Department approved a $2 billion arms sale to Taiwan, a deal that China regards as provocative. NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Explained: Trump’s immigrant policy; what the ICE planned, and why Related News us china relations, us taiwan relations, china taiwan relations, donald trump, xi jinping, Tsai Ing-wen US President Donald Trump with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping.Written by Rick Gladstone Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

West Bengal Police intervene after BJP workers chanting Hanuman Chalisa block road

first_imgBy Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 16, 2019 10:25:32 pm Delhi: Ex-BJP MLA acquitted for ‘stopping’ train in 2010 Bengal clash, west bengal clash, bjp police clash, bengal bjp police clash, hanuman chalisa, bjp hanuman chalisa chanting, indian express BJP leader Ishrat Jahan at the Hanuman mandir on Dobson Road.Controversy erupted in Bengal’s Howrah area after BJP supporters organised a programme of chanting Hanuman Chalisa on Tuesday and police had to intervene to disperse the crowd. Mukul Roy claims 107 West Bengal MLAs from CPM, Congress, and TMC will join BJP Day after quitting as Rajya Sabha MP, Neeraj Shekhar joins BJP Advertising Related News According to sources, the supporters had gathered in front of Howrah’s AC market on Dobson Road to chant Hanuman Chalisa. After some time, cops from Howrah City Police station arrived and tried to disperse the workers from the spot as they were blocking the road and had no permission.Police told iebangla that the event by BJP workers blocking the road was a hindrance to the movement of traffic. Hence, they requested the workers to move aside. However, the BJP supporters refused to give in and police had to intervene.BJP leader Ishrat Jahan, who was present on the spot during the clash, told iebangla, “Chanting Hanuman Chalisa is a religious affair. It wouldn’t have been much of a problem to allow that for ten minutes. It was unfair on the part of police to treat common people and the BJP workers this way. They have forcefully stopped us from chanting.” Read in BanglaThe BJP youth wing workers have been chanting Hanuman Chalisa at the Hanuman Mandir on Dobson Road for past two weeks. The police had barricaded a space for the devotees to pray. 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

Critics Love HomePods Sound but Rap Its Smarts

first_img‘Embarrassingly Inadequate’ While Apple doesn’t have the volume of third-party relationships that some of its competitors have, it does have a significant base of HomeKit certified smart home device providers that will support smart home control through the HomePod, ABI’s Collins noted.”There is every reason to believe that the pull of the Apple user base — especially given the close integration of the HomePod with iPhones — will be enough to attract a wide range of third-party support over time,” he maintained.However, even the HomeKit experience on the HomePod could use some improvement, wrote The Verge’s Patel.”Siri as a smart home controller on the HomePod works fine if you have compatible devices and have done the work of setting up HomeKit, but nothing about HomeKit is particularly simple or fun to use,” he observed. “But that’s basically the state of every smart home system, so I don’t think Apple’s too far behind there.” John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John. Speaker Blindness Not recognizing speakers may not sound like a big deal, but it can be if you’re the kind of person who blindly rushes through setup prompts.”If you just click yes during all the setup prompts, literally anyone can ask the HomePod to send or read your text messages,” wrote Nilay Patel for The Verge.”Seriously, it’ll just read your texts to anyone if your phone is anywhere on the same WiFi network, which usually reaches far beyond the same room as the HomePod,” he pointed out.While Siri can’t distinguish speakers, it is good at recognizing speech, even distorted speech, according to Nicole Nguyen, who reviewed the HomePod for BuzzFeed.”Siri could hear me while I was wearing my retainers (“Hayy Sheeree, remind me teh bring mah headphonez toomerow”), brushing my teeth, or cooking with the overhead vent turned on,” she wrote. Sell It and Developers Will Come It could be a difficult hill to climb if Apple should decide to expand its service offerings in the future.The HomePod’s initial exclusivity will “make it harder for the product to move out of the Apple loyalist space,” Enderle maintained.Many of the customers outside of Apple’s base might already have bought Amazon Echos, he reasoned. Getting them to pay a hefty price for a product they could see as redundant would be problematic.The absence of the HomePod’s seamless support for non-Apple music services will put a damper on interest on the part of serious music listeners, said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.”If you’re an Apple fan who mainly wants a Siri-activated solution to stream Apple Music files, you’ll love the HomePod. If you’re looking for a serious Apple-based competitor to Amazon Alexa or Google Home-based devices, you’re likely to be disappointed,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Then again, Apple has a long history of initially aiming new products at its dedicated customers, then adding in other features and functions over time,” King added. Failing to Keep Up With the Alexascenter_img Though disappointing, Siri’s so-so performance as a smart speaker digital assistant was expected.”Siri has not kept pace with Alexa and Google Assistant in capabilities,” Tirias Research Principal Analyst Kevin Krewell told TechNewsWorld.Apple has never taken Siri seriously, noted Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the Enderle Group, treating it more as a feature than a platform.”Amazon, Google and even Microsoft take AI far more seriously and are putting millions into their related efforts,” he told TechNewsWorld. “Apple is starting behind, and their lack of focus on this capability suggests they’ll fall farther back and not catch up.”Despite its shortcomings, Siri has an advantage over its rivals in the smart home context because it supports more languages than they do, said Jonathan Collins, a research director at ABI Research.”As the smart home voice-control market continues to grow, this will be a key benefit its rivals will have to match,” he told TechNewsWorld. Dampening Audiophiles’ Interest Critics have begun weighing in on Apple’s HomePod smart speaker, and they’re loving the device’s sound but don’t have much affection for its smarts.The HomePod’s sound outclassed top-shelf competitor SonosOne, according to Matthew Panzarino, writing for TechCrunch.”The HomePod was the ‘best’ sounding. It’s nuanced and subtle with great separation and clarity across all kinds of music,” he wrote.”The One, for instance, had decent mid range but an overly bright high-end with just the out of the box calibration,” Panzarino continued. “At maximum volume, the One became shrill and painful where the HomePod maintained balance.”Pumped out through a woofer with custom amplifier and seven tweeters, the audio also impressed Brian X. Chen, who reviewed the HomePod for The New York Times.”The result is a speaker with a deep bass and rich treble that is loud enough to fill a large room with superb sound,” he wrote. “HomePod makes the Amazon Echo and Google’s Home sound muffled and tinny in comparison.” However, Chen was less complimentary about the performance of Apple’s digital assistant, Siri, on the HomePod.”Siri on HomePod is embarrassingly inadequate, even though that is the primary way you interact with it,” he wrote.”Siri is sorely lacking in capabilities compared with Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Assistant,” Chen continued. “Siri doesn’t even work as well on HomePod as it does on the iPhone.”For example, Siri on the HomePod can’t be trained to recognize different speakers.”Unlike ‘Hey, Siri’ on your phone, the HomePod responds to everyone,” wrote Megan Wollerton for Cnet.”That makes it easier for the whole family to use,” she explained, “but hurts its customizability across multiple users, since it can’t recognize a specific voice to allow purchases.” Another sore point with critics was the lack of support for services outside the Apple ecosystem.”The HomePod also doesn’t really know that Pandora exists or Tidal or Google Play Music or SiriusXM or TuneIn Radio or SoundCloud or any of a thousand other music services that you might use throughout the course of listening to music in your lifetime,” wrote The Verge’s Patel.”It’s an incredibly frustrating limitation,” he continued. “Amazon owns Amazon Music, but lets you set Spotify as the default on the Echo. Google runs Google Play Music and YouTube, but lets you set Spotify as the default on the Google Home.”Apple hasn’t been courting third-party apps as aggressively as Amazon and Google, said Ross Rubin, principal analyst at Reticle Research.”Today, HomePod is being sold into the base of Apple Music subscribers,” he told TechNewsWorld. “It’s a decent market to sell into — it has 40 million subscribers — but it’s limited compared to Echo’s and Google’s addressable market.” Apple Music Exclusivitylast_img read more

Researchers achieve breakthrough in blood vessel engineering

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 6 2018When someone has a deadly disease or sustains a life-threatening injury, a transplant or graft of new tissue may be the best — or only — treatment option. Transplanted organs, skin grafts and other parts need blood vessels to bring oxygen-rich blood their way, but for tissue engineers and regenerative medicine experts, making a functional blood vessel network within large tissues in the laboratory has long been a major challenge.Now, a research group at the University of Delaware has pioneered methods to grow a self-assembling, functional network of blood vessels at a size relevant for human use. Jason Gleghorn and his colleagues are the first to make this system work at this scale, and their results were recently published in the journal Biomaterials.Gleghorn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Delaware, studies how the embryo builds tissues and organs during development with the goal of using this knowledge to define new regenerative medicine strategies. While other groups have made blood vessel networks that span millimeters in size, the UD system works across centimeter scales, necessary for functional tissue replacement. With more development and refinement, Gleghorn’s microfluidic system could someday be utilized to grow blood vessels for tissue and organ transplantation into humans.How to build blood vessel networksThe team embedded human blood vessel cells into a gel made of collagen, a protein found in connective tissue such as skin and joints. The goal was to determine the physical conditions necessary to make the cells grow, multiply and connect with each other so that a network of blood vessels assembled itself.Making blood vessel networks is tricky business because the system doesn’t always behave how investigators expect. During his doctoral training, Gleghorn was part of the first team that developed techniques to create patterned blood vessel networks for tissue engineering using microfluidic techniques.”As an engineer, we can say we think the cells need to be this far apart or the vessels need to be a certain size and spacing,” Gleghorn said. “We can create a very precise environment and structure for the cells, but the problem is that biology doesn’t work that way. The cells remodel everything. They change shape and size and push and pull on each other and the materials they are embedded in to rearrange our ‘perfect’ home that we think they need. The reality is we need to design systems that will encourage cells to remodel themselves and their environment to generate a functional tissue.”Instead, Gleghorn’s group asked: “What is the fundamental initial starting point of the system that we need, and then can we kick it in the right direction to get it to evolve and build its own architecture similar to the way your body does it during development?” he said.For one, using a powerful confocal microscope at the Delaware Biotechnology Institute, the group found that the density, or stiffness, of the collagen gel affected how the cells suspended within it behaved, ultimately affecting the size and connectivity of the vessels.Related StoriesInnovative microfluidic device simplifies study of blood cells, opens new organ-on-chip possibilitiesMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorBlood based test using AI and nanotechnology devised for chronic fatigue syndrome”It looks kind of like the holiday dessert with fruit suspended in Jell-O,” said Gleghorn of the cells in the collagen gel. “You have a bunch of cells randomly distributed throughout the volume of the gel, and if they are sparsely distributed, it gets very hard for them to talk to each other and form connections to form vessels. The languages they use are chemical signals and physical forces.” The key is to find the sweet spot of stiffness, stiff enough so that neighboring cells can interact with the material and each other, but not so stiff that the cells can’t move.The team also found that by perturbing their system in a specific way, they could affect the size and shape of the vessel networks under assembly.”From larger vessels to much smaller microvessels, which are really hard to make, we can now tune the vessel network architecture with the initial starting parameters,” said Gleghorn. This means that the new system could have applications from forming larger vessels deep within the body to tiny capillaries, the teeny vessels in your fingertips.Gleghorn’s team also found that their lab-grown blood vessels were perfusable, suggesting that blood could flow through them without leaking out of the vessels into surrounding gel. The vessel networks can also form throughout a variety of shaped gels, meaning that this system could be useful for building blood vessel networks in tissues with complicated shapes, such as the meniscus cartilage that pads your knees or a large skin graft for burn patients.In addition to Gleghorn, authors on the new paper include Joshua Morgan, a former postdoctoral scholar at UD who is now an assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside; Jasmine Shirazi, a graduate student in biomedical engineering; Erica Comber, a former undergraduate research assistant who earned an honors degree in biomedical engineering from UD in 2017 and is now pursuing a doctoral degree at Carnegie Mellon University; and Christian Eschenburg, head of R&D at Orthopedic Technology Services GmbH active in Germany, who did research in Gleghorn’s lab as part of the Fraunhofer-UD graduate student exchange program. This work was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, University of Delaware Research Foundation, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities Ralph E. Power Junior Faculty Enhancement Award and the March of Dimes Basil O’Connor Award.Now, Gleghorn’s group is learning even more about how blood vessel networks form so that they can refine their system. With Babatunde Ogunnaike, the William L. Friend Chair of Chemical Engineering, Gleghorn is mapping out mathematical formulas to describe how blood vessels form and remodel in developing chicken embryos in the egg. “Then we plan to take the math and systems engineering and couple it with the biology — the molecules and the signaling pathways — that we know, and apply it to these 3D tissue-engineered models to make more complex hierarchical blood vessel networks” said Gleghorn. That project is supported by an award from the University of Delaware Research Foundation.Source: https://www.udel.edu/udaily/2018/november/gleghorn-lab-blood-vessel-network/last_img read more

Zuckerberg Chan give 30M to Harvard and MIT for literacy

The Reach Every Reader program will combine scientific research with methods of tracking and predicting students’ reading abilities to develop a web-based screening tool to identify kindergartners at high risk of reading difficulties.MIT President Rafael Reif said “struggling to read can be a crushing blow with lifelong consequences” and when millions of children struggle, it’s “a crisis for our society.”Chan called the five-year effort “a unique combination of cutting-edge education and neuroscience research.”Zuckerberg created Facebook while a Harvard student but dropped out. Chan graduated from the Ivy League school in 2007. Explore further Facebook’s Zuckerberg to give Harvard graduation speech This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, are giving Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology $30 million to help improve the literacy skills of elementary school students across the nation. Citation: Zuckerberg, Chan give $30M to Harvard and MIT for literacy (2018, March 7) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-zuckerberg-chan-30m-harvard-mit.html read more

Google Facebook come down on the side of elephants rhinos tigers

©2018 The Mercury News (San Jose, Calif.) Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Citation: Google, Facebook come down on the side of elephants, rhinos, tigers (2018, March 12) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-google-facebook-side-elephants-rhinos.html A week after the United States quietly lifted a ban on imports of sport-hunted elephants’ ivory and lion parts from certain African countries, the World Wildlife Fund has announced that Google, Facebook and other major tech firms are joining an effort to halt the illegal trade of wildlife and wildlife parts. Explore further Critics hit US over elephant trophy imports “Advances in technology and connectivity across the world, combined with rising buying power and demand for illegal wildlife products, have increased the ease of exchange from poacher to consumer,” the WWF said in a news release.”As a result, an unregulated online market allows criminals to sell illegally obtained wildlife products across the globe. Purchasing elephant ivory, tiger cubs, and pangolin scales is as easy as click, pay, ship.”The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had in November lifted a ban on importing ivory and other elephant parts from animals killed by trophy hunters in Zambia and Zimbabwe, but President Donald Trump put the move on hold, suggesting such trophy hunting was a “horror show.”But in a March 1 memo, the Fish and Wildlife service said it would evaluate import permits for parts from elephants, lions and bontebok antelopes killed in specific countries “on a case-by-case basis.”However, poaching and the illegal trade of wildlife and animal parts have raised fears that some species, including African elephants, mountain gorillas and white rhinos, could lead to their disappearance within our lifetimes. And much of the trading is now facilitated by the internet, the WWF said.To stop illegal online trading of wild animals and their parts, the WWF will bring together its partners—including a number of large tech companies—to share “lessons learned and best practices,” the organization announced.Founding members of the “Global Coalition to End Wildlife Trafficking Online” include Google, Facebook, Instagram and Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, according to the WWF, which added that 20,000 elephants are killed every year for “ivory trinkets and ornamental objects” and that “three rhinos are killed each day in South Africa alone for their horns for tonics and aphrodisiacs and carved ornamental cups.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

Whats Facebook Watch and will you like it

first_img Citation: What’s Facebook Watch and will you like it? (2018, August 27) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-facebook.html ©2018 Newsday Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. “Strangers” got nearly 8 million streams for the opening episode and a small fraction of that thereafter. This seems to be a pattern with most Facebook Watch shows. Lots of people sample, few return.’SKAM AUSTIN’Based on a Norwegian web series, each episode unfolds in real time, and characters post to Instagram while it’s in progress. “SKAM” (the word means “shame”) is also a hit, or appears to be one. About 10 million views were counted for the launch back in April, but fewer than 2 million for week 8. The show was recently renewed.Any adult, say, over the age of 30 coming to “SKAM” enters terra infirma, brimming with cognitive cues and sub-verbal expressions, all immersed in the lingua franca of social media. Hey, it’s about teens. With a handheld camera and extreme tight focus, “SKAM” explores the fictional world of Bouldin High School in Austin, specifically the world of one Megan Flores (Julia Rocha), a lonely, awkward kid who has a boyfriend, Marlon (Till Simon).It’s a sharply drawn portrait of the jungle—that high school one—with some good performances. But “SKAM” can also be a formless dreamscape, adrift in emotions and inner lives. Of course, it’s possible that’s its chief appeal, too.’SORRY FOR YOUR LOSS’Finally, there’s “Sorry for Your Loss,” which launches Sept. 18. There’s an embargo on reviews until early next month, but it’s hardly giving too much away to observe that this, too, is good. Big Beach TV is the production company.The cast is especially notable for a Facebook Watch scripted show—indie star Elizabeth Olsen in her first series; Tony and Olivier Award winner Janet McTeer; and “The Last Jedi” breakout Kelly Marie Tran.”Sorry” is about Leigh Shaw (Olsen), who’s immersed in grief following the death of her husband, Matt (Mamoudou Athie). Her sister, Jules (Tran), and mother, Amy (McTeer), try to help, and so does her brother-in-law, Danny (Jovan Adepo), who’s adrift in his own grief.A tragedy? Yes, but also a comedy. Above all: Facebook Watch’s most important launch to date. What is “Facebook Watch?” If you said, “another ingenious/devious way for Facebook to consume every last second of my life,” you wouldn’t be wrong. If you said, “haven’t a clue,” you wouldn’t be alone. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img And if you said one of the more important initiatives by the world’s largest social-media company, you’d be spot on. Launched last August, Facebook Watch is Facebook’s answer to YouTube, Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and every other streaming service, including, soon, Apple and Disney. On this, the first anniversary, it’s now packed with reality shows, docuseries, sports (including Major League Baseball) and news (ABC’s “On Location” launched recently), as well as a handful of scripted series.Nevertheless, lightly promoted and sporadically viewed, Facebook Watch remains something of an enigma—a stealth enterprise that can be hard to define if not exactly hard to find. The tab is right there on your homepage, right below “Messenger.”Why the vaunted importance? One reason: Millions of teens have abandoned Facebook, and most of the scripted series—overwhelmingly teen and young-adult-oriented—are tasked with bringing them back.So, what’s worth watching on Facebook Watch? Here’s a quick glance at three key—and definitely watchable—scripted series.’STRANGERS’This comedy is about Isobel (Zoe Chao) and Cam (Meredith Hagner), best friends in the Echo Park section of Los Angeles the first season, who then relocated to New York for the second, which wrapped Sunday. Introduced at Sundance, and later Outfest, in 2017, Isobel was described by producers as “a woman living fully in the bi-sphere—bisexual, biracial and now bicoastal.” Indeed, her sexuality is fluid or, better word, evolving, while season 2 ends with what appears to be an orientation commitment.With “Strangers,” think “Girls” along with a splash of “Broad City.” The “Girls” comparison is intentional or unavoidable, in part because creator Mia Lidofsky was at one time assistant to “Girls” director Jesse Peretz. Like most of Facebook Watch’s scripted content, there’s an indie vibe here. Like all Facebook Watch content, the production values are decent, far from profligate. What’s best about “Strangers” are the performances (full of vitality) and the writing (amusing and self-assured).”Strangers” appears to be a success, in part because viewers have told it so. “With the Watch platform, you get the opportunity to see in real time the audience response and engagement,” executive producer Michael Clark, said in an email. Explore further Is Facebook going to reinvent TV with Facebook Watch? Well, it’s tryinglast_img read more

How to make computers faster and climate friendly

first_img ‘Approximate computing’ improves efficiency, saves energy This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. When the cryptocurrency mining company Hut 8 opened Canada’s largest bitcoin mining project outside Medicine Hat, Alta., environmentalists sounded the alarm. The plant consumes 10 times more electricity, largely produced by a natural gas-fired power plant, than any other facility in the city. Globally, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the information, communication and technology (ICT) sectors are forecast to reach the equivalent of 1.4 gigatonnes (billion metric tonnes) of carbon dioxide annually by 2020. That’s 2.7 per cent of global GHGs and roughly double Canada’s total annual greenhouse gas output.By designing energy-efficient computer processors we could reduce energy consumption, and we could reduce GHG emissions in places where electricity comes from fossil fuels. As a computer engineer specialized in computer architecture and arithmetic, my colleagues and I are confident these positive effects can be achieved with almost no impact on computer performance or user convenience. Powerful connectionsThe Internet of Things (IoT) —made up of the connected computing devices embedded into everyday objects —is already delivering positive economic and social impacts, transforming our societies, the environment and our food supply chains for the better. These devices are monitoring and reducing air pollution, improving water conservation and feeding a hungry world. They’re also making our homes and businesses more efficient, controlling thermostats, lighting, water heaters, refrigerators and washing machines. With the number of connected devices set to top 11 billion —not including computers and phones —in 2018, IoT will create big data requiring huge computations. Citation: How to make computers faster and climate friendly (2018, September 26) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-faster-climate-friendly.html Your smartphone is far more powerful than the NASA computers that put Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon in 1969, but it is also an energy hog. In computing, energy use is often considered a secondary problem to speed and storage, but with the rate and direction of technological advancement, it is becoming a growing environmental concern. Provided by The Conversationcenter_img Making computation more energy efficient would save money and reduce energy use. It would also allow the batteries that provide power in computing systems to be smaller or run longer. In addition, calculations could run faster, so computing systems would generate less heat.Approximate computingToday’s computing systems are designed to deliver exact solutions at a high energy cost. But many error-resilient algorithms like image, sound and video processing, data mining, sensor data analysis and deep learning do not require exact answers.This unnecessary accuracy and excessive energy expenditure is wasteful. There are limitations to human perception —we don’t always need 100 per cent accuracy to be satisfied with the outcome. For example, minor changes in the quality of images and videos often go unnoticed. Computing systems can take advantage of these limitations to reduce energy use without having a negative impact on the user experience. “Approximate computing” is a computation technique that sometimes returns inaccurate results, making it useful for applications where an approximate result is sufficient. At the University of Saskatchewan’s computer engineering lab, we are proposing to design and implement these approximate computing solutions, so that they can optimally trade off accuracy and efficiency across software and hardware. When we applied these solutions to a core computing component of the processor, we found that power consumption dropped by more than 50 per cent with almost no drop in performance.Flexible precisionNowadays, most personal computers contain a 64-bit standard numerical format. This means that they use a number with 64 digits (either zero or one) to perform all the computations. 3-D graphics, virtual reality and augmented reality require the 64-bit format to work. But basic audio and image processing can be done with a 32-bit format and still provide satisfying results. Moreover, deep learning applications can even use 16-bit or 8-bit formats due to their error resilience The shorter the numerical format, the less energy is used to perform the calculation. We can design flexible, yet precise, computing solutions that run different applications using the most appropriate numerical format so that it promotes energy efficiency. For example, a deep learning application using this flexible computing solution could reduce energy consumption by 15 per cent, according to our preliminary experiment. In addition, the proposed solutions can be reconfigured to simultaneously perform multiple operations requiring low numerical precision and improve performance. The IoT holds a great deal of promise, but we must also think about the costs of processing all of this data. With smarter, greener processors we could help address environmental concerns and slow or reduce their contributions to climate change. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Internet of Things could improve quality of life, but it will also consume vast amounts of electricity and boost greenhouse gas emissions. Credit: Shutterstocklast_img read more